Ordering LiAlH4 (at Sigma Aldrich)

  • Hi Longview. My though on this matter is simply that if Li6 is 'poison' as axil suggests then any reaction involving Li7->Li6 would soon stop, and a meltdown (for example) would not be possible.


    I have explained that the fuel preparation process uses Lithium 7. This step produces the metalized lithium which is meta-stable. The QuarkX reactor shows that the metalized lithium survives temperatures that exceed the melting point of nickel. The fact that the QuarkX can be restarted shows that the metalized lithium can persist in a quiescent state for weeks before being reactivated.


    In short, once metalize lithium 7 is formed, it does not require additional attention. In Fact, the purpose of LiAlH4 is to keep additional metalized lithium from forming to avoid a reactor meltdown. LiAlH4 acts as a moderator that provides fuel but does not increase the amount of nuclear active metalized lithium 7(NAE).


    The reactor that WizKid built used pure Lithium 7 fluoride and melted down because he did not stop his reaction and add LiAlH4 to moderate the reaction to stop the formation of additional NAEs.


    When wine is made, you add some chemical to kill the yeast when the alcohol content reaches 12.5 percent. If this is not done, then the wine becomes too strong as the yeast keeps on increasing.

  • that if Li6 is 'poison' as axil suggests


    Should it eventually prove important, at least it is relatively easy and safe to separate the major lithium isotopes compared to U for example. Not only that, to my understanding, there are or were once substantial stockpiles and market activity in the enriched/isolated lithium isotopes.

    • Official Post

    When wine is made, you add some chemical to kill the yeast when the alcohol content reaches 12.5 percent. If this is not done, then the wine becomes too strong as the yeast keeps on increasing.


    No you don't! The yeasts action is self limiting in that accumulation of waste products (in this case Alcohol) eventually inhibits further fermentation. There are more specialised cases involving fortified wines, but when making table wine I know of no system which deliberately halts the reaction using 'chemicals'.

  • No you don't! The yeasts action is self limiting in that accumulation of waste products (in this case Alcohol) eventually inhibits further fermentation. There are more specialised cases involving fortified wines, but when making table wine I know of no system which deliberately halts the reaction using 'chemicals'.




    https://www.scientificamerican…lcohol-content-gets-high/


    Quote

    Stamp agrees, and sees other problems. “Wines that are 15 percent alcohol and more are not exactly wines you can make it through two or three bottles of over the course of a meal with friends,” he says. “They're wines you might want to drink a glass of, but they're not wines that respond well to a lot of the more delicate styles of food we see in modern restaurants.” Sommeliers, he says, have begun pushing consumers to consider more moderate-alcohol wines with higher acidity and more delicate character that pair better with many foods, he says, and some have embraced the suggestions. But for those who prefer big, bold wines and would still like to be able to drive home, science may have a solution.

  • There are more specialised cases involving fortified wines, but when making table wine I know of no system which deliberately halts the reaction using 'chemicals'.


    Some wine yeasts will naturally ferment out to around 18% before they are inhibited by the alcohol level - but the wine would be too dry to the taste. So you can add sulphite salts to stop the yeast finishing off all the sugars. It will say 'contains sulphites' on the label.

  • Regarding:


    Enigmatic E-Cat of Andrea Rossi and the Unitary Quantum Theory
    by Leo G. Sapogin, Vladimir A. Dzhanibekov, Yuri A. Ryabovhttps://drive.google.com/file/d/0B1_tFmz65k8BVWZyRGdZemRfdTduZWZQUnBlQTc0Z3hVOF9V/view?usp=sharing


    Did you notice the term “catalyst poisoning” in the article above. This is caused when a fermion isotope(Lithium 6) is mixed in with a boson isotope (lithium 7)


    Did you also notice that Rossi did not answer Hank Mills request for info in his blog
    November 2, 2016 at 10:13 PM


    This is Rossi's secret to getting his reaction going without meltdown. That is, the proper adjustment of the Lithium 6 to Lithium 7 ratio in the fuel. The proper adjustment is a Lithium 7 percentage above natural abundance. For example, the Lugano Li7 ratio was 94%. Lithium 6 acts as a moderator with too much LI6 in the fuel killing the reaction.


    After the fuel prep stage, then Rossi can add COTS LiAlH4 so don't be confused. Pure Li7 is used to produce metalized hydrides confined in the cavities in the nickel but after metalized hydride formation, LiAlH4 is added to moderate the LENR reaction.