Media/News/Video Library-No discussions please

  • Would a carrier material (ceramic tube or sintered stainless steel) coated with Multiple layers Pd ( inner layer) Ni (outer layer) be an idea for a concrete setup? Inside tupe D/H feed, Ni surface heat transfer. Where would the reaction take place?


    The ideal LENR sandwich structure would be a styrene or any other H*/D* promoting catalyst coated by a thin layer of Nickel. On top of the Nickel side you place your thick Hydrogen soaked Pd layer. If you use a thinner Pd layer then you can feed Hydrogen to the Pd side while the H*/D* promoting catalyst side is kept under low pressure.


    The only part missing in this receipt are the spices needed to transport the fusion energy!

  • The ideal LENR sandwich structure would be a styrene or any other H*/D* promoting catalyst coated by a thin layer of Nickel. On top of the Nickel side you place your thick Hydrogen soaked Pd layer. If you use a thinner Pd layer then you can feed Hydrogen to the Pd side while the H*/D* promoting catalyst side is kept under low pressure.


    The only part missing in this receipt are the spices needed to transport the fusion energy!


    Since this thread is for news only, I created a new discussion thread to discuss LENR according to SO(4) physics. Please join.

  • This concept with modern alloys and an ultra compact heat source onboard (instead of wireless or whatever) could work today. What do you all think?


    I think nobody ever built one of these that is more than 50-60% efficient. That's the problem. In their favour- they are cheaper and more robust than conventional turbines. Maybe if somebody could build one with more than one stage - like most modern turbines have it would be more efficient, but the design doesn't seem to favour that. It might be possible to use a Tesla turbine as a high-pressure stage and a more conventional turbine as a low pressure one- but the advantages are hard to see.

  • I think nobody ever built one of these that is more than 50-60% efficient. That's the problem. In their favour- they are cheaper and more robust than conventional turbines. Maybe if somebody could build one with more than one stage - like most modern turbines have it would be more efficient, but the design doesn't seem to favour that. It might be possible to use a Tesla turbine as a high-pressure stage and a more conventional turbine as a low pressure one- but the advantages are hard to see.

    True let's say even with optimisation we are stuck at 65% efficiency, if your energy source is dense enough what other examples are as durable and simple? You are right that there maybe no benifits assuming commercially available standardised parts/power sources. Although without assessing the options considering for example 200 times current chemical engine energy densities, conservatively inferred by hydrogen experiments, we don't have the potencial picture.

  • This is a news item, I guess.


    Robert Park, the archenemy of cold fusion, died on April 29, 2020, age 89. He will not be missed. Not by me, anyway. Yet at the same time I told Steve Krivit (who brought me the news): ". . . If he had not led the charge against cold fusion, it would have been someone else. The only thing I regret about him is that he was smart. It is better to have stupid opponents such as Morrison."

  • This video is a way to detect the products and expected photonic energy from these keV hydrogen bonds. configurations of charged particles also lead to increased conductivity and strange magnetic intensity.

    Video on solvated electron percipitates.

  • William Stubs.. alternatives to quarks.. Vixra 2019


    https://vixra.org/pdf/1912.0083v1.pdf

    https://pdfs.semanticscholar.o…804-1882556141.1594144327

    "

    3. But They Are Not Quarks
    Bjorken and Paschos expected the proton F2
    curve to peak at about x = ⅓, something like the plot
    on the top in Fig. 1. This would show that the
    proton was made of three particles, as Gell-Mann
    predicted.

    It did not. Instead, the measured data
    gave the curve on the bottom in Fig. 1.
    Approaching zero from x = 1, the F2 curve rose
    until about x = 1
    ∕5 and appeared to remain constant
    within a wide scattering of data points for the
    duration of the available data. From this result,
    Bjorken and Paschos concluded that the proton was
    not made of just three particles and therefore, not
    made of Gell-Mann’s three quarks

  • Error 404 : I can’t access the page. It is probably Mg2Ni. It can accommodate 7.1 % in weigth of deuterium, eight time the pallladium content. I want to note that in many positive results, including the first work of Fleischman and Pons, the element lithium is present in the experimental setups. We know since the first thermonuclear explosions in 1952-54 that lithium is a good candidate for fusion reactions. Unlike the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction the deuterium-lithium 6 fusion reaction or proton-lithium7 fusion reaction do not produce neutrons.

    It will be a good idea to test new hydrogen-storing alloys, and to alloy some of them with lithium. There is many new hydrogen-storing alloys developped during the last years for the energy storage and the metal-hydride batteries field. It will be a good idea to test all theses alloys in order to replace our old brave palladium, which is a very expensive metal.



    I emphazise the fact that the small size of the lithium atom make possible to use the classical cementation techniques to build new fusion alloys. (Cementation is the diffusion of light atoms like carbon in the lattice of metals alloys. It is a solid state diffusion at high temperature.) It is probably possible to use lithine powder (lithium oxyde) at a temperature near 1000°C to produce metal cathodes with a skin of lithium containing alloy. In the Rossi-Parkhomov experiments, there is probably a quick cementation between the nickel powder and the lithium of the lithium-aluminium hydride. The possibility of the use of new alloys is a very good new: we are not condamned forever to work with our costly palladium. It is not the nucleus of palladium which is important : it is the crystal structure of the metal.

  • This is honestly a better website with more information on the alloy to absorb. It is amazing how two or more common elements can/may perform significantly better than one more expensive element.

    Error 404 : I can’t access the page. It is probably Mg2Ni. It can accommodate 7.1 % in weigth of deuterium, eight time the pallladium content. I want to note that in many positive results, including the first work of Fleischman and Pons, the element lithium is present in the experimental setups. We know since the first thermonuclear explosions in 1952-54 that lithium is a good candidate for fusion reactions. Unlike the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction the deuterium-lithium 6 fusion reaction or proton-lithium7 fusion reaction do not produce neutrons.

    It will be a good idea to test new hydrogen-storing alloys, and to alloy some of them with lithium. There is many new hydrogen-storing alloys developped during the last years for the energy storage and the metal-hydride batteries field. It will be a good idea to test all theses alloys in order to replace our old brave palladium, which is a very expensive metal.



    I emphazise the fact that the small size of the lithium atom make possible to use the classical cementation techniques to build new fusion alloys. (Cementation is the diffusion of light atoms like carbon in the lattice of metals alloys. It is a solid state diffusion at high temperature.) It is probably possible to use lithine powder (lithium oxyde) at a temperature near 1000°C to produce metal cathodes with a skin of lithium containing alloy. In the Rossi-Parkhomov experiments, there is probably a quick cementation between the nickel powder and the lithium of the lithium-aluminium hydride. The possibility of the use of new alloys is a very good new: we are not condamned forever to work with our costly palladium. It is not the nucleus of palladium which is important : it is the crystal structure of the metal.

    I was thinking more as an anode or a coated fuel substrate in a plasma environment. Hopefully we can get it done with both nuclei intact, in a tight intimate dance under an electron canopy so neutrons and coulomb barriers aren't a problem.

  • Two new papers by Mike Staker


    Regarding the SAV phase.


    Staker, M.R., A model and simulation of lattice vibrations in a superabundant vacancy phase of palladium–deuterium. Modelling Simul. Mater. Sci. Eng., 2020. 28


    https://www.lenr-canr.org/acrobat/StakerMRamodelands.pdf


    Staker, M.R., Estimating volume fractions of superabundant vacancy phases and their potential roles in low energy nuclear reactions and high conductivity in the palladium – isotopic hydrogen system. Materials Science & Engineering B, 2020. 295

    https://www.lenr-canr.org/acrobat/StakerMRestimating.pdf


    Discussed here Staker Model :palladium deuteride high velocity collisions

  • Activity continues, friends! All local, and coming soon to your village. Physically-distance, I'm in hibernation from COVID, and fully-evaporated into the noosphere, and growing lots of radishes this year. But when I walk my dogs around the neighborhood, I drop free food and books in little boxes on the streets at various locations in our town. Not-too-bad stricken with virus, but still hurting. I also leave some hope on the shelf too. Here's a food box with a sticker:

    It sure would be great to come out of this with a new energy technology.


    I learned that Edmund Storms had "dozens of cells going at one time" back in 1989-1990, a total of 250 or so for the tritium experiments. (only 13 of which activated to make tritium, 4 really well.) Dozens at one time. That is what the world is missing. Where is there a lab large enough to get this figured out by systematic testing? Why isn't this kind of experimentation happening? Testing out and eliminating the variables methodically is way better than multiple separate and smaller labs each doing their own thing uncoordinated. What would be the cost for a lab to run dozens of cells at one time? Let's work towards this direction, take advantage of this unique moment. New energy can greatly assist the global transformation happening now.


    There is some good news. The comic book is actually happening!https://www.discovercoldfusion.com/

    The publisher has the files and will be releasing the Discover Cold Fusion comic book. I don't know exactly when, but it looks like a couple more months to get it together and print. Everything takes months. Infinite Energy Magazine had a story on it and if you get the magazine, the inside front cover is also a poster! Here is a link to the .pdf from their website. http://infinite-energy.com/ima…micDiscoverColdFusion.pdf

    I got my issue though:

    James Martinez said he wanted to make the cold fusion scientists rock stars, and I think we did that Tiger Beat style.

    That is Matt Howarth's art BTW and he is prolific. Click here to get some of his sci-fi comics and graphic novels he posted for free over pandemic lockdown: http://bugtownmall.com/New_Matt_Howarth_Stuff-083114.htm I had to learn that this 32-page Discover Cold Fusion is technically a comic book, while graphic novels are some 60-80 pages.


    I will make a thread when it comes out for the Reviews. I know LENR-forum will spare no words. I am so psyched.


    Together, lots of moments of the day, let's meditate with brain waves congruent on Alan's well being.

  • In June I uploaded the LENR-CANR.org bibliography in EndNote export format, here:


    http://www.lenr-canr.org/EndNoteExport.txt



    I have improved that file by adding all of the LENR-CANR.org URLs (links). For example:


    Fleischmann, M., S. Pons, and M. Hawkins, Electrochemically induced nuclear fusion of deuterium. J. Electroanal. Chem., 1989. 261: p. 301 and errata in Vol. 263 http://lenr-canr.org/acrobat/Fleischmanelectroche.pdf.


    URLs outside of LENR-CANR.org are listed for 44 papers, such as:


    Biberian, J.P., Biological transmutations. Curr. Sci., 2015. 108(4) http://www.currentscience.ac.in/Volumes/108/04/0633.pdf.



    Here is how you include the URL in your end notes. This is how it is done with my copy of the program, Version X8, which may be out of date.


    First, download the latest version of the EndNoteExport.txt file and import it into your EndNote program. Then, select Edit, Output Styles and select the style you use. For example, you might use the EndNote standard Numbered style, or the Nature magazine style. Select your style, and then then select Bibliography, Templates, and modify each of the reference types to include the URL with the dot and line next to it, like the other fields. There is a little box on the top right that allows you to add the "URL" field to each reference type. That sounds complicated, so here is what the screen looks like:



    See the "URL" terms in the red boxes. In this example I modified the Nature magazine style. When I go to close the screen, it asks me for a new name "Save As." You cannot change the original, built-in Nature style.





    If you write many papers, I recommend you learn to use EndNote. It saves a lot of work and prevents mistakes. It keeps things orderly. If you add a new reference it renumbers. If you refer to the same reference twice, it uses the same number. If you add three references in a row it lists them with a hyphen. Like so:


    . . . results were analyzed by Miles, Fleischmann and Imam. [7-9]


    Where the references are:


  • I learned that Edmund Storms had "dozens of cells going at one time" back in 1989-1990, a total of 250 or so for the tritium experiments.


    In an array. I have a photo of it somewhere. Bockris used a 10 x 10 array of itty-bitty cells to look for tritium.


    In their video analysis, F&P used an array of 4 cells, and they ran 4 arrays at a time. See: