The Playground

  • This arrived in my morning “Medium” daily selection e-mail, and I thought interesting to share here, but not LENR related, and frankly, exotic enough to belong to the Playground thread, as a ray of “antigravity” that is measured to be 64x faster than light and not loose energy after passing through concrete houses and traveling 1,2 Km., it’s kind of Sci Fi, but the researcher claims and experiments are published.


    https://medium.com/predict/eug…ty-generator-8749bbdc8378

    They say the stones markings are from a fabric weave but I have wondered if the pattern was more of a wave as it expands thought-out.

  • playground fun.

    Even though it looks like I've been posting various projects its all related to building the ball

    plating materials with inorganics to insulation and release carbon and gasses like icecream in a baked dough routine to keep the lower core from going.

    the inner ball versus the outer skin. alchemy to breakdown the materials within. the different casings feeding the materials to the focus point and use RF to cold bond all the ingredients with time to seek new orbits and return to a solid.

    what the new orbits will be or how reactive, what the decay rate will be using a cold bond method and using insulated very active material throughout the ball... reactive to magnetic fields ect Its still a long way to go.

    but its fun to think about.

  • ... "Finally, again on the researching of prior art - often an inventor or discoverer did something in a less than "clinical" fashion, and this haphazard method is where the key lies! But they often do not realize this, nor do the blind followers. (so while you pointed to a replication - I'm sure done very professionally and faithfully - it may have missed the key almost entirely, because something was less than ideal, and actually caused the conditions to make the material, or process of creating the experiment - unknowingly)."

    RE: Successful attempts in university of Bengaluru / India


    Fogbank example

  • Cathode plasma electrolysis in diluted potassium hydroxide solutions: Particles formation and energetic estimation

    Production of Heat during Plasma Electrolysis in Liquid

    Nanosecond pulsed discharges in distilled water Part I: Continuum radiation and plasma ignition

    Nanosecond pulsed discharges in distilled water Part II: Line emission and plasma propagation

  • Cathode plasma electrolysis in diluted potassium hydroxide solutions: Particles formation and energetic estimation

    https://www.lenr-forum.com/attachment/14961-gromov-opt-pdf/


    Just a personal remark after a calculation I made out of curiosity. 0.125–0.625 wt% KOH as used here should correspond to a molarity of about 0.0011–0.0056M, so indeed quite diluted. That's incidentally about the range I've been using recently in my crude testing with cathodic plasma electrolysis. In the past I used to employ significantly higher KOH concentrations (up to 2M) but they might have actually been counterproductive (with my setup at least), as well as making for rather acoustically noisy and potentially dangerous experiments.

  • Just a personal remark after a calculation I made out of curiosity. 0.125–0.625 wt% KOH as used here should correspond to a molarity of about 0.0011–0.0056M, so indeed quite diluted.


    I think that as they were using a system with potentially up to 300V @2.5A they would have avoided a high concentration of electrolyte - it might have become too conductive at lower voltages and then they would not have seen the micro/nano particles produced, which i think was their intention. I have done a similar experiment using iron electrodes and produced black iron oxide in particles so small I could not differentiate them well with a very good optical microscope, and so reactive they turned into red heamatite -the preferred form - in a minute or so when exposed to the air.

  • Alan Smith

    An issue with these experiments is that with a too high electrolyte concentration the plasma becomes unstable and instead of a glow discharge, sparks occur. Since in cathodic plasma electrolysis both hydrogen and oxygen are (or can be) evolved at the cathode due to thermal water dissociation (see Mizuno here), H2–O2 explosions then become likely. These may have been the main source of the loud and sharp noises I used to observe. Also, as water is repeatedly displaced during these energetic spark/explosion events, the overall reaction rate, which acquires a kind of intermittent character, might become lower.


    For micro/nanoparticle production and characterization in the same process I guess I would need better tools than what I'm using.

  • ... "Consequently, I propose to view the transistor as an emerging invention – in contrast to a discrete or singular one – with an emergence period spanning several decades. I propose to distinguish between an exploration phase (~1920-1945), a consolidation phase (1945-1950), and a maturation phase (1950-) whereas the intermediate consolidation phase represents a topological transition as is characteristic of emerging fields. Another emphasis of this article lies on the role of informal knowledge in the invention process. In the transistor case, such informal knowledge included patent specifications with proposed device designs, amateur radio magazine articles with reported anomalies, and oral anecdotes in practitioner circles describing experimental configurations of interest. This research asserts that such kinds of informal knowledge played an important role early on in the invention process as they guided both early research campaigns and managerial decisions, including at Bell Labs."


    Florian Metzler - The Transistor, an Emerging Invention [aka Darden Industrial Heat as the new Bell Labs]

  • The FET transistor has been used a long time before it has been invented as one later did find that the telegraph needle used this effect unknowingly!


    Fascinating, if true, but an internet search (in English) returns no evidence that it is.


    Although, strangely enough, when searching for "telegraph needle transistor" the highest ranked page (#43) that actually makes this claim, is this one.


    Perhaps you are quoting a German work*? If so, a link to it would be useful, please.


    *Or confusing a FET with a relay?

  • Fascinating, if true, but an internet search (in English) returns no evidence that it is.

    Off course this is a little cheating as only half (2/3) of the FET can be found in the telegraph needle. The needle usually is covered by a very thin layer of oxids that normaly would block any current. So in reality is a field effect Diode only. This you learn in standard classes about semiconductor design/physics.

  • Exactly -early telegraphs used crystal detectors.

    Kids too 8>
    Ah Galene (natural lead oxide) detector... and before that the Branly coherer... I remember it was mysterious ... Percolation theory seems to have helped understand it, but I forgot the final story...


    The difficulty to reproduce LENR because of f*g material discrepancies' nobody understands, is nothing foreign to an electronician with some knowledge of history...