Technical Support - Assembly and Calibration LENR TEST KIT Mk1 'Model T'

  • Need any help with calibration or assembly?
    This is the technical support thread!




    Assembling and Calibrating LENR Test System – Model T:
    http://www.lookingforheat.com/…NR-MODEL-T-BUILD-BOOK.pdf


    Intelligent PID Temperature Controller:
    http://www.lookingforheat.com/…mperature-Controller-.pdf


    Further instructions can be found in our 'Research Notes' section:
    http://www.lookingforheat.com/research_notes/


  • Engineering upgrades to Model T.


    We have made two changes to the Model T reactor, as a result of customer feedback and our own testing. Firstly we have added a cooling fan to the PWM to improve service life and output stability. This will be included in kits sold from 1st August onwards. Secondly as of 'right now' we are changing the reactor support from an Aluminium cradle to Foamed Alumina ceramic. This is to reduce heat losses through the cradle (which could be surprisingly high) and also as a modest contribution to user safety. Touch a hot piece of metal and because the heat-transfer is so rapid it burns, touch a hot piece of foamed ceramic insulator and the usual response it is to just go 'ouch'! - it doesnt transfer heat to your skin so fast.


    Worth pointing out that the fan pics were taken showing the trial installation on LFH's lab 'donkey' system. This carries all the loads, and consequently looks a little more battered than usual!

  • This is a device that enables people who want to do experiments but lack the engineering capability (or the workshop space) to do so for a relatively small amount of money. That's it. It is a shovel, not a gold mine. If you go and look at our website you will see we make no claims, but sell equipment and chemicals to responsible adults. When we have some stunning results to share, you will be the first to know,

  • Following some interesting discussions going on on the 22passi blog by a certain person claiming having tested an E-Cat years ago when Rossi was still operating in Italy, I'm interested knowing if somebody from LFH.com ever tried measuring the inductance of LFH Model-T tubes loaded with powder. Given that AC or pulsed power seems to be used by Rossi and others it might be useful to know this property more in detail, for example for studies with circuit simulators.


    EDIT: on a slightly related note, in the past day or so I've been studying a bit the subject of electrodeposition for potential experiments I might do at some point in the future, and in the process (while reviewing some LENR patents) I realized that Piantelli originally used bars of various materials onto which nickel or other materials are deposited; so far nothing new. But it's less known that the startup process often specifically included fast rise pulses through a solenoid wound around the core in order to produce large magnetic fields (> 1T). Here are potentially some similarities with what is claimed to be occurring with Rossi.


    I think the outcome here would be strongly affected by the the core (mainly) and the active material/layers.

    A solid core of a material of high magnetic permeability would make these cells act more like "proper" inductors.

  • I have been working on the area of triggering for a while. But first let me answer your question.


    The inductance of a M-T core with fuel load is very low, a fraction of a Henry from memory. I should measure it again!. But let me explain why that is. Since we don't really have much control over who uses our reactors, except that they should be over 18 years old, we supply them with a 36V heating system. Thus little danger of electric shock. The wires we use for heating need to be fairly thick - they are in fact 0.9mm - otherwise they have a very short life. This means that we can only have around 30 turns to form the heater coil -so inductance is low. It's all a compromise.


    Right now it's dinnertime, but I will get back to this topic later with some more thoughts on triggering systems, magnetic fields, waveforms and so on.

  • I tried looking at the LFH website and indeed the coil does appear to have about 30 turns. I don't know the exact measurement but I would guess it has a 0.75mm radius and 100 mm length? I tried plugging these values in a very useful solenoid properties calculator I found and for an air core (relative permeability = 1) indeed the inductance seems to be very low, only 0.00187 mH. With an actual load this should increase slightly. However, with a solid core (and the powder disposed around it, if used) this could increase significantly. According to Wikipedia::Magnetic Permeability, pure iron has a magnetic permeability of 5000. Not only the inductance would increase to 9.38 mH (still low), but the generated B-field would also be much larger (although in practice it would reach saturation far below the calculated value for a 10A current). More turns and a wider coil would of course help greatly.


    EDIT: I thought it would be interesting to also cite the anecdotal report of Stanislaw Szpak who witnessed a thermal runaway with an electrolytic, co-deposited Pd cell using light water (protium) and under a magnetic field (minute 11:02 in this video) - I accidentally found this yesterday while I was looking into electrodeposition.

  • The coil wire is 0.9mm, the length of the wound coil is around 110 mm, and the median diameter is 19mm. The current is around 10A, so you guessed pretty well. I have tried increasing the inductance by various means, including a layer of iron foil around the fuel tube, but it doesn't make much difference to the inductance.


    I am pretty sure that in order to get his devices not to work, Rossi is using square (ish) wave AC at up to 440v input voltage and running at (possibly) 7-800 Hz. Since he uses split phase heaters, there is a powerful 'dynamo' effect on the fuel containment. Attached is a document I wrote some time ago- there is more about the Lugano dynamo effect on page 6.


    alan dusty plasma.pdf

  • I am interested in looking into the Vacuum Triode Amplifier. Can I get a barium ferrite magnet measuring 10cm by 15 cm by 2.5 cm (6x4x1 inch). Do you stock this item? I also would like to get some germanium oxide for work on research into magnetocaloric spin energy transfer. Do you have this material or if not, do you stock any other high magnetocaloric substitute material?

  • Hi Axil. I can get your magnet, one of my contacts actually manufactures them. Germanium Oxide might be more difficult - how much do you need? We should do this by email btw, use my private one via the forum email service.

  • I am pretty sure that in order to get his devices not to work, Rossi is using square (ish) wave AC at up to 440v input voltage and running at (possibly) 7-800 Hz. Since he uses split phase heaters, there is a powerful 'dynamo' effect on the fuel containment. Attached is a document I wrote some time ago- there is more about the Lugano dynamo effect on page 6.


    I did a thorough analysis of the Lugano power system in 2014. From a photo I identified the red power box as a Control Concepts (CCI) Compact Fusion three phase controller, rated at 50 amperes. In the manual for that unit, I found it has an operating mode where power is set by an algorithm that skips complete half-cycles of the AC supply. See the excerpt at http://magicsound.us/MFMP/CC_cycle_skip.jpg

    Note that the waveforms shown match those in the image of the Lugano PCE-830 waveform display.


    Why was a controller used with such high current capacity? The image linked below shows the harmonic content of the CCI unit vs output percentage. The peak harmonic content (240%) occurs around 8% of the unit's capacity, or 4 amperes. This corresponds to 960 watts, the operating level of the Lugano reactor.

    http://magicsound.us/MFMP/CC_THD_vs_output.pdf


    I have a spice circuit simulation of the waveform that could be used to model the B-field if someone wants to pursue it.

  • The coil wire is 0.9mm, the length of the wound coil is around 110 mm, and the median diameter is 19mm. The current is around 10A, so you guessed pretty well. I have tried increasing the inductance by various means, including a layer of iron foil around the fuel tube, but it doesn't make much difference to the inductance.


    Does the gram or so of Ni powder generally fill all the internal volume of the Model-T ceramic tubes? What's the internal diameter of these tubes?


    I am pretty sure that in order to get his devices not to work, Rossi is using square (ish) wave AC at up to 440v input voltage and running at (possibly) 7-800 Hz. Since he uses split phase heaters, there is a powerful 'dynamo' effect on the fuel containment. Attached is a document I wrote some time ago- there is more about the Lugano dynamo effect on page 6.


    I've found this video of iron powder on a magnetic stirrer. Do you mean like this? These stirrers generally use magnets on a rotor, though.