Dr Pierre Clauzon , part of the scientific comittee of Leonardo Corporation?

  • About discussion on the Dr and Eng title, note that in france, "Ecole d'Ingénieurs" are very respected, especially in the industry.
    It can be translated as MSc (master of science) for average engineering school, but for the few A-Class schools (Polytechnique, Centrale Paris, Supélec, Suptélécom...) it is preferred to PhD level.
    I know an industrialist who is proud to write "Docteur Ingénieur" because he did a PhD thesis after an engineering grade in a top school, and because depending in which circle you gravitate, PhD or Engineer is the most respected title.


    There is a fight in France between engineering school and universities, because the Universities feel that engineering school diploma are more appreciated than PhD and they disagree.
    It seems the Italian system is not far... maybe less extreme than in France.


    If you want to judge who is the most brillant in France between a PhD and an engineer, read his CV.

  • Alain,


    To add one more element, in the US, a person can generally only use the title of the profession in the state they are licensed. So, a nuclear engineer from Italy, would definitely not be a nuclear engineer in Florida unless licensed there.

  • Alainco - I don't recall who but do remember the matter. I don't speak French and was getting occasional translation assistance from a couple of friends. It is best that those fine gents speak for themselves. They are honest and have their own independent opinions. I think they are most interesting in preserving their reputations and pushing their own research forward. (which is very interesting as you know).

  • It's now apparent that there are subtle differences in the use of such terms as PhD, doctor, Dr., engineer, etc., in each country (I wish the situation was more standardized). When seeking to communicate with other people using a specific language (e.g., English), I think one should do one's best to adopt the conventions that are used in that language (such as they exist between different countries) rather than continuing with a title that is clear in one's own language (Italian) but misleading in the other (English). But this point is already obvious to all involved.

  • Not only the terms differ but also the education and recognition level.
    Engineer as I've heard in US is not very recognized, unlike in France.
    In France PhD is not as appreciated in the industry, as in academic circles, even for applied research.


    To be clear in France, when you seen an engineer of Polytechnique, he can talk equally with a PhD of MIT, or a MBA of Oxford, depending on his CV and interests. Hard to find the good term.


    Ingénieurs in France is said by some translators to be Master of Science level, with various prestige.

  • Engineer as I've heard in US is not very recognized


    In North America at least (not sure about the UK), anyone with a bachelor of science degree with a major in engineering who then goes on to pursue a profession in that specialty will be an "engineer." A bachelor's degree is a basic four-year degree, usually without a thesis.

  • You can be an engineer in the UK after serving an apprenticeship. Whole heap of them in my family, precision engineers, tool-makers, mould makers, airframe engineers and so on. Although I only have a Batchelor's degree-gained late- I have also served an apprenticeship and have a bunch of high-level machining qualifications. In Italy they call me 'Dottore' - but I always demur. Grade inflation is a rather charming Italian custom, they used to say there was no-one in the Italian Navy under the rank of Commodore.

  • In North America at least (not sure about the UK), anyone with a bachelor of science degree with a major in engineering who then goes on to pursue a profession in that specialty will be an "engineer." A bachelor's degree is a basic four-year degree, usually without a thesis.


    True. But it is also key that a person be licensed in the state they are practicing engineering. There are specific requirements in terms of examination and supervised experience for each specialty. If you are not licensed in a specific state you can't hold yourself out to the public as being an engineer there.