Gold From Mats Lewan’s Impossible Invention Book (Engineer48)

  • [feedquote='E-Cat World','http://www.e-catworld.com/2016/08/21/gold-from-mats-lewans-impossible-invention-book-engineer48/']The following post has been submitted by Engineer48 Guys, OK time to come clean Don’t really know why but until today I had never read Mat’s book. More fool I. Can tell you there are pure GOLD nuggets in that book, so much so that I have decided to toss my hat into the ring. […][/feedquote]
  • Oh this is just priceless!!! Evidentally Engineer48 has entered a magical realm much like that of the book/movie "The Da Vinci Code" by finding hidden codes and secrets in Lewan's book combined with his amazing detective sleuthing skills to ultimately solve the mystery of the impossible machine! IH was going to pay $100 million dollars for this magic technology, but for a mere $1000 you too can have the machine of the century. Has Engineer48 gone mad along with Rossi? I think the air has become FAR too thin on planet Rossi as of late. I can't even believe Engineer is serious with this nonsense!


    Edit: OBVIOUSLY when they write the book/movie for this ridiculous circus, it would make most sense to name it "The Rossi Code". Instead of Rose Line, we have Rossi Line...this stuff will just write itself! haha

  • Oh this is just priceless!!! Evidentally Engineer48 has entered a magical realm much like that of the book/movie "The Da Vinci Code" by finding hidden codes and secrets in Lewan's book combined with his amazing detective sleuthing skills to ultimately solve the mystery of the impossible machine! IH was going to pay $100 million dollars for this magic technology, but for a mere $1000 you too can have the machine of the century. Has Engineer48 gone mad along with Rossi? I think the air has become FAR too thin on planet Rossi as of late. I can't even believe Engineer is serious with this nonsense!


    I've seen a series of posts from Engineer48 that demonstrate way too much belief in his own ideas.


    The idea of creating an inexpensive demonstration kit is not new. However, is it a demonstration kit or an experimental kit? Here he is, he read a book and got fired up, thinks he understands what is going on, where experts have failed. Okay, that's not impossible, though it is highly unlikely.


    He has not confirmed his own ideas, yet is already predicting a price for the kit. In other words, he doesn't know it actually works, but is already convinced. Those are, then, conditions that can set up confirmation bias. Still, if he can pull it off, great! There are people who will try the kit. What will they report? Is he going to offer a money-back guarantee?


    I did, before confirming it, offer a kit, but it was a kit to replicate the SPAWAR neutron work, which used narrowly defined components and materials. I found I could sell a single-cell replication kit for $50, which included solid state nuclear track detector chips, i.e., pieces of LR-115 film. Supply a power supply and sodium hydroxide for development and heat for that, and that was all needed. A microscope to look at the developed films.


    I got one order. Not a problem, I still have the materials, though I worry about the heavy water absorbing hydrogen through the plastic bottles.


    An NiH kit that reliably generates substantial heat would, my opinion, sell like hotcakes at $1000, if others confirm that it works.


    However, Engineer48 is counting his chickens before they have hatched, in a field where countless others have crashed and burned.


    He writes:


    Quote

    OK some may say that is putting the cart before the horse but you see I think I have figured out how to make the Rossi Effect work and why others have so far, well publicly at least, failed to see excess heat.


    However, he does not tell us what he figured out. Now, scientists working on the problem who think they have figured out something don't announce it on a blog. They test the idea first. If they need funding, they write a proposal and submit it, privately.


    Without any description of what he thinks he knows, he's attempting to generate buzz.


    Quote

    If I sell 1,000 kits at $1,000 each, well I’ll be very happy that I made a good return and that LENR will never be suppressed. BTW these kit will be fully functional black boxes that deliver reliable excess heat output. So not a DIY bunch of parts but a fully functional black box that generates very significant excess heat the DIY integrators can apply to water and air heating as they desire.


    And yes they will be certified as to the excess heat generated by authoritative independent certifiers.


    Now, the real question: why did Rossi not do this in 2011?


    Absolutely, this could work if E48 actually knows how to make a device. The problem is at this point that Rossi probably doesn't know, himself, has fooled himself and/or others, and IH, with extensive resources and supposedly the full cooperation of Rossi, at first, couldn't pull off what E48 thinks he can do.


    I will agree. There is a tinge of insanity to this. By the way, I do not equate "insane" with "bad." However, most insane people do end up crashing and burning.

  • I sincerely doubt it, there are amazingly few active experimenters. You might sell 50/100 at best.


    Assuming it works, I think you could sell more. Word would get out that it works and people who are not involved in the field would buy one. I think you could soon sell tens of thousands.


    It worked that way with the early microcomputers, such as the MITS Altair. People who had no idea they get a computer for themselves heard about it, and ordered it. Later, people who did not even know they wanted a computer got one. The Altair had not practical purpose at first. It was an expensive toy.

  • It worked that way with the early microcomputers, such as the MITS Altair. People who had no idea they get a computer for themselves heard about it, and ordered it. Later, people who did not even know they wanted a computer got one. The Altair had not practical purpose at first. It was an expensive toy.

    Yes. I built one of the original kits. 256 bytes of memory. It was fun.


    The key here is a kit that works. If it is just an experimental kit, "find out if it works," forgeddaboudit. At $1000, there might be no sales.

  • Quote

    An NiH kit that reliably generates substantial heat would, my opinion, sell like hotcakes at $1000, if others confirm that it works.

    What? This is so absurd to be near insane. Any kit whatever that "reliably" generated "substantial heat" from any type of LENR or fusion reaction and could be proven to do so by a) proper calibration b) sufficient power ratio and c) long enough runs without fresh fuel ... that would be worth BILLIONS. Of course, no such thing exists or has been adequately proven to exist.


    This sort of incredibly wild UNDER-estimation of value is a classic tell of believers who have no clue.


    Jed, early microcomputers is a complete red herring. Those were unreliable due to component failures or poor software design. Causes of poor reliability were well understood and were rapidly worked around. LENR is unreliable because well... it is unreliable.

  • What? This is so absurd to be near insane. Any kit whatever that "reliably" generated "substantial heat" from any type of LENR or fusion reaction and could be proven to do so by a) proper calibration b) sufficient power ratio and c) long enough runs without fresh fuel ... that would be worth BILLIONS.


    There is no contradiction. Microcomputers were worth billions, but they started off selling a few hundred at a time. Then they ramped up thousands, then millions. They were first purchased by enthusiastic engineers and programmers, such as me. We went on to create a larger consumer market for them.


    Many technologies follow this trajectory. Automobiles also began selling a few dozen at a time in the 1890s. A decade later they were selling in thousands, and a decade after that in the millions.


    Mainframe computers were only made by corporations, not individuals or enthusiasts. Some were big such as IBM, but some were start-up companies. In any case, they began by selling a few dozen copies of a model. It wasn't until the IBM 650 that they sold 2000 copies, in 1953.


    I am not saying a cold fusion reactor would necessarily follow this pattern, but it might.

  • Sure, it might. But at the moment, there is no such a thing as a proven LENR reactor. I say again and you did not refute: any conclusive demonstration of substantial power generation by LENR would be worth billions. Substantial as per a definition I offered earlier which you vigorously disliked.


    Microcomputers were not based on brand new theoretical requirements but rather on miniaturization of existing technologies. LENR is based on new theories and there are no credible examples of high power LENR to look at. I see no parallel at all. ANyway, IMO, your reply did not even address what I wrote.

  • Sure, it might. But at the moment, there is no such a thing as a proven LENR reactor.


    My statement was hypothetical. You seem to have some difficulty with hypotheticals. I said "if it works" and you said "it does not." The does not negate what I said.


    I say again and you did not refute: any conclusive demonstration of substantial power generation by LENR would be worth billions.


    But, as I said, many industries worth billions started off on a small scale, for a few years. That is quite common in the history of technology. Other well known examples include railroads and aviation. Railroads began as riding toys and exhibition rides:


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catch_Me_Who_Can

  • I got lost somewhere. This was the original issue I was responding to:


    Quote

    An NiH kit that reliably generates substantial heat... worth ... thousand...


    How would something that met that criterion not work all the time. Not "if". If it met the criterion, it would.


    As to Mat's book... well, Mats seems like nice guy with a fine family. He writes engagingly about his travels and visits with Rossi and the other inhabitants of RossiWord. But there is no gold in the book other than maybe as a travelogue. Most of the technical part is either Rossisays or simply nonsense Mats heard somewhere and believed uncritically without proper evidence. The man is the height of gullibility. I mean all he had to do was insist on calibrations starting with original ecats... and doing those himself with his gear alone. And he didn't have to think of it! I and many others started telling him this in mid 2011! Of course, Rossi would have thrown him out, but he still would have credibility and probably a job at NyTeknik who, I suspect, won't let him work for them again.

  • I got lost somewhere. This was the original issue I was responding to:


    I said "assuming it works . . ." That is hypothetical.


    How would something that met that criterion not work all the time.


    It would be somewhat reliable, but not very reliable. Like a microcomputer in 1978 or an automobile in 1902. It would not last for long, and it would not be useful for most practical purposes. Many early model machines were like that.

  • Not that it matters, Jed, but my remarks were directed at Abd who made the remarkable assertion that a working and reliable LENR reactor would currently be worth about $1000! Gee Abd, I'd happily give you $100K for one on the spot. Provided I did the testing, of course.


    Same offer I made to Jeff Otto when he claimed on PESN that he had constructed an HHO ("Brown's gas") boosted Honda Accord which made 100 mpg. Never did get to try out that car despite my generous offer (they wanted money for "research"). I wonder why. I bet I don't get to try out a high power LENR reactor any time soon either. For much the same reasons.

  • The similarities Mary are that early Radio was a whole new field, like LENR. There was a thriving community of thousands of independent radio tinkerers and more focused academic researchers supported by clubs and magazines that grew up from 1910 (or thereabouts) onwards. My own father built a Baird system TV (spinning mirrors etc) in the 1920's, and converted a Mk19 aircraft radar into a TV in the early 50's. Many of the things which are now 'standard' in the field of radio communications were discovered and developed by amateurs - it is a long list, a very long list.


    ETA- mentioning my father, it just occurs to me- my avatar image is actually his picture. :)

  • Alan, you see the current state of LENR as similar to early radio?


    Again, you seem to lack the ability to recognize or contemplate hypothetical statements. He did not say it does resemble radios. He said it might, if it worked.


    How does that work? The first commercial radios were ship-borne and were available as early as before WW1.


    I believe the reference was to audio radio broadcasts, which remained in the domain of the enthusiast and amateur for some time, until 1920. Radio remained difficult to use and inaudible until the mid-1920s, I believe.

  • Do not want to be too negative, because you just never know, but this comes across as a little strange. Strained maybe, and a little too much hype. It is like we were softened up for this...or at least the remaining Rossi believers were, by E48's coming to Rossi's defense about the "GPT". Like a "confidence game" builder, and then bam...now that you can trust my motives, do I have a deal for you! :)


    He does say:


    I have personally seen what unrestrained greed does to the best of people and it is not nice.


    If I sell 1,000 kits at $1,000 each, well I’ll be very happy that I made a good return and that LENR will never be suppressed.

    Which is a little contradictory if you ask me. He has seen greed, but wants to make his own million $? And telling someone that he is doing it for Rossi?...like I said, something does not come across right to me. Like I said, I could be wrong, and if E48 would like to say something here in response, I am all ears. And if sincere, and he has something, just like me356, I hope he makes $1 billion.

  • I sincerely doubt it, there are amazingly few active experimenters. You might sell 50/100 at best.


    That is crazy Alan, once a couple trusted names in the field bought kits and posted videos and reviews, they would absolutely sell like hot cakes. If we could have access to a peek into the technology of the century for $1000, myself along with many others here would be throwing money at Engineer48. No question they would all sell out easily and quickly.


  • Assuming it works, I think you could sell more. Word would get out that it works and people who are not involved in the field would buy one. I think you could soon sell tens of thousands.


    It worked that way with the early microcomputers, such as the MITS Altair. People who had no idea they get a computer for themselves heard about it, and ordered it. Later, people who did not even know they wanted a computer got one. The Altair had not practical purpose at first. It was an expensive toy.


    I got to work on an Altair as a kid...I would give my left arm for one now. I have quite an extensive computer collection going back to the late 70s, but the Altair is one I am still drooling over!

  • Mary Yugo wrote:
    Not as long as we are beyond P&F who, I remind folks, were amply funded and supported for going past 20 years!


    No, they were not amply funded or supported for long. Politics and greed destroyed their project, alas.


    Mary, you might retract the statement. Pons and Fleischmann did their original work, pre-1989, in their own dime. When they realized they needed more money, and asked for it, the proposal went in front of Stephen Jones, who saw similarity (incorrectly) to his own work. The resulting mess and legal ramificactions forced Pons and Fleischmann to announce when they were not ready. The did receive substantial funding, moving to France for the Technova project, which was gone by the mid-1990s, if I'm correct. Jed would know better. They might have had six or so years of funding. And were, to some extent, running down a blind alley, though they did some useful work in France. Most of it, apparently, has never been published.


    After the rush in 1989, when a lot of money was wasted on poorly-formed studies, funding for cold fusion research became very difficult. While there were points where funding was substantial, such as the effort in Japan, about which Jed could say much more, there were also serious, ah, stupidities involved. Again, Jed correct me, but the Japanese insisted on using the purest possible palladium, which didn't work, wasting millions of dollars. But, hey, isn't purer better?


    Yeah, for some controls, maybe. Not for the main show until it's known to work. Use material from "Uncle Martin," it was said.


    Pure is not necessarily better if the effect is happening on the surface and the nanostructure of the material matters a great deal. This is all still not clearly understood, though ENEA, in particular, seems to know how to make material that works.

  • I just realized the DEEP irony in Engineer48 presenting a "black box" for demonstration of the Rossi Effect, which is exactly what Steorn did with its black box cell that Frank was testing over on E-Scat World! Is today April 1st or is this just a day of awesome comedy?


    EDIT: I attached todays screenshot of the amazing demonstration of the Steorn Orbo....DEAD!

  • I got to work on an Altair as a kid...I would give my left arm for one now. I have quite an extensive computer collection going back to the late 70s, but the Altair is one I am still drooling over!


    Yeah. I sold mine in the 1990s to a good home for $1. The I/O ribbon cables were breaking, it was kind of a mess. I had expanded it with an 8 MB memory card, as I recall. Cost a fortune. I had an IO card, and a video interface, that was about it. I had written a program to use an ordinary cassette recorder to store and retrieve data. Wrote an article about it for Byte magazine, 1977. I think it's still available on-line. I was using the name "Daniel" then.


    Quote

    Is it an impossible dream? Is it conceivable to make an audio cassette 10 port with only a single bit line in each direction? Well, if you ignore the need for connecting wires, clipping diodes and isolation capacitors, then you can use a "hardwareless" software technique such as that described in Daniel Lomax's The Impossible Dream Cassette Interface.


    The hardware was, for the output, more or less wiring the interrupt enable line to the cassette mike input. Reading was done by clipping the interrupt line to the power rails and feeding the signal through an isolation capacitor. The modulation was variable pulse length.(So the time it took to transmit a byte depended on the data). It all ran in very little memory, I built this when I only had 256 bytes.


  • Yeah. I sold mine in the 1990s to a good home for $1. The I/O ribbon cables were breaking, it was kind of a mess. I had expanded it with an 8 MB memory card, as I recall. Cost a fortune. I had an IO card, and a video interface, that was about it. I had written a program to use an ordinary cassette recorder to store and retrieve data. Wrote an article about it for Byte magazine, 1977. I think it's still available on-line. I was using the name "Daniel" then.



    The hardware was, for the output, more or less wiring the interrupt enable line to the cassette mike input. Reading was done by clipping the interrupt line to the power rails and feeding the signal through an isolation capacitor. The modulation was variable pulse length.(So the time it took to transmit a byte depended on the data). It all ran in very little memory, I built this when I only had 256 bytes.


    I am quite jealous that you owned one, I don't think I could have parted with it! lol I will see if I can track down your article...I may even have that issue in print! I fired up one of my TRS-80s a few months ago with the massive 5 MEGABYTE harddrive cabinet with the keylock start lol...it actually still works! The funny part is that I never filled up the 5Mb drive, amazing how far things have come.

  • Not that it matters, Jed, but my remarks were directed at Abd who made the remarkable assertion that a working and reliable LENR reactor would currently be worth about $1000! Gee Abd, I'd happily give you $100K for one on the spot. Provided I did the testing, of course.


    Same offer I made to Jeff Otto when he claimed on PESN that he had constructed an HHO ("Brown's gas") boosted Honda Accord which made 100 mpg. Never did get to try out that car despite my generous offer (they wanted money for "research"). I wonder why. I bet I don't get to try out a high power LENR reactor any time soon either. For much the same reasons.

    If it was being sold to the public for $1000, you would be completely dumb to pay $100K.


    Honestly, Mary, develop some sense of how to model possibilities with words. You would give $100K without personally testing it first?


    This was about a "black box" offered for sale, apparently as an energy amplifier, for heating water. If the price were $1000, there might be a few who would try it. If they validated it, sales would skyrocket, even if it was more or less a piece of junk, but ... an actual demonstration of excess heat. Yes. If it worked, it could be worth millions or even billions, but E48's idea was to sell it to the masses.


    I must say that Shane's suspicion doesn't seem ridiculous to me. Look, if you are going to do this great service for the world, do it first. Then you get to crow about it.


    Watch as E48 says that he needs a few thousand dollars to build it. Just a few, mind you. Next month,


    "we realized we need more, so we are asking our generous donors, the ones supporting the energy future of humanity, to kick in a bit more. We promise the reactors will be ready in three months."


    Wait! Has a prototype been built? Does it work? Who has tested it?