Hideki Yoshino (CleanPlanet) will talk on LENR at Nikkei BP company event called "Future Creation Square in Marunouchi"

  • Sangakut reports a talk of Clean Planet CEO "Hideki Yoshino"
    at a Nikkei BP event 「みらい創造ひろばin丸の内」 roughly translated as "Future Creation Square in Marunouchi" (to be improved I suppose).


    http://amateur-lenr.blogspot.fr/2016/10/in.html




    This is not 100 clear for me, but I connect that with previous post on Nikkei BP report including LENR/CMNS among the future technologies.

  • https://e-catworld.com/2019/01…gen-energy-press-release/


    Good catch by Acland. CleanPlanet's Hideki Yoshino, landed some funding from Mitsubishi Estate Group. They are a real estate company, not the car automobile company. Yoshino started CleanPlanet to develop LENR, and is at Tohoku University...one of the participants in the recent A. Takahashi's, NEDO (government) funded, collaboration with Toyota/Nissan, and 3 other universities.

  • As I understand it, Clean Planet is the route for quite a lot of the funding behind the whole Japanese LENR program, and was set up precisely for that purpose.


    I do not know about that. I do know the whole Japanese government program was small, only about $1 million, and Clean Planet did not get much of that money. Most of the people at Clean Planet are retired, and the equipment came from Mitsubishi, so I would say it is a shoestring effort. I was not impressed by the results they showed a few years ago at MIT. I wrote a critique in English and Japanese and circulated it an ICCF conference. Their lawyer responded to me threatening a lawsuit for copyright violations -- for using their graphs to show problems in the work. I was not impressed by that, either.


    As I said, as far as I know, the government program ended in 2017. You claimed you had a hand in triggering it, and someone in the LDP said it would be $30 million. Ask them to fork over the other $29 million.

  • Its good news no matter what. The Japanese researchers are good guys who have rigor and a replicative nature in their approach. We needed for the Tohoku team to stay in the hunt and Yoshino is commended making this happen. I think these funds should allow them another 12 to 18 months but they are going to need much more money than this. I hope they can reach their goals and reach the next tranche.

  • Comment to Jed Rotwell message #4.


    Dear Jed,

    this time I don't agree with You about evaluation of agreement among CleanPlanet (chaired by Hideky Yoshino) and Mitsubishi "estate", as following:


    A) The agreement is an important step toward a practical application of LENR-AHE effect.


    B) Mitsubishi estate was funded since 1937 and has a BIG reputation to keep "safe" and is going "step by step" as expected;


    C) The fact that some/several Colleagues involved in the CleanPlanet project are in the status of "retired" (mainly from Academy) is an extra bonus because they have LARGE experiences, most probably in several different fields, i.e. MULTIDISCPLINARITY, as need in the LENR-AHE field.


    C1) I just remember the, in modern times, the retiring age is NOT related to damaged brain but it is just a burocracy aspect of our complex society.


    C2) Among the retired people, at International level involved in the LENR-AHE studies, I would like to quote: Brian Josephson (Nobel Laureate), Akito Takahashi, Tadaiko Mizuno, Jorhota Kasagi, Hideo Kozima, Yoki, Sun Won Park, Edmund Storm, Mike Mc Kubre, Dennis Letts, Jean Paul Biberian, Chino, Li Xing Zhong, Leif Holmlid, Alan Smith, Ubaldo Mastromatteo, myself,....


    C3) All of them are very active and (most of them) in EXCELLENT brain/body conditions.....


    D) I hope that the new Japan project will have success, in prospective, useful not only to Japan people but to the man-kind.


    My best wishes (and sorry because several english mistakes, as usual.....)


    your friend Francesco CELANI

  • As I said, as far as I know, the government program ended in 2017. You claimed you had a hand in triggering it, and someone in the LDP said it would be $30 million


    So everyone is on the same page; it was IH who said in an 2016 (old news) email industry update (court document #214-35), that they had identified $31 million the Japanese government had provided to fund LENR researchers. They (IH) were trying to get some of that money.


    Now, 2 years later, Mitsubishi Estate -a private sector real estate company, has invested in the Japanese company Clean Planet (thread title) for LENR research.

  • So everyone is on the same page; it was IH who said in an 2016 (old news) email industry update (court document #214-35), that they had identified $31 million the Japanese government had provided to fund LENR researchers. They (IH) were trying to get some of that money.


    No, it was $1 million, not $31 million. It was part of a larger NEDO energy research project. The total may have been $31 million; I don't recall. During the discussion phase there was a long list of projects they were thinking about funding, with total funding of something like $31 million. Cold fusion was only one item on the list. The planning document I found the other day said cold fusion would get "approximately 100 million yen" ($1 million).


    Did IH say they were trying to get some of it for themselves? That sounds improbable. I can't imagine NEDO would give money to a non-Japanese researcher or corporation. All of this money went to university-affiliated mainstream academics. Elite National Universities in this case, not private ones. Maybe IH meant they would try to influence NEDO to give some to a Japanese research group.

  • Comment to Jed Rotwell message #4.


    Dear Jed,

    this time I don't agree with You about evaluation of agreement among CleanPlanet (chaired by Hideky Yoshino) and Mitsubishi "estate", as following:


    I do not know anything about the Mitsubishi estate funding. I was talking about the previous NEDO program, for $1 million. I think it ended in 2017. I hope this new program replaces it. I did not hear about Mitsubishi at ICCF-21.



    C) The fact that some/several Colleagues involved in the CleanPlanet project are in the status of "retired" (mainly from Academy) is an extra bonus because they have LARGE experiences, most probably in several different fields, i.e. MULTIDISCPLINARITY, as need in the LENR-AHE field.


    C1) I just remember the, in modern times, the retiring age is NOT related to damaged brain but it is just a burocracy aspect of our complex society.


    I mentioned they are retired because that means they don't cost anything. I said the project is done on a shoestring with only a fraction of $1 million from NEDO and a little funding from a few other places. That's what they told me. The project can be done on a shoestring because they are not paying the researchers, as far as I know. The researchers have pensions.


    I did not mean to suggest that retired scientists cannot make valuable contributions. Although, let us face it, scientists and programmers in their 20s do far more work than people in their 60s. Most discoveries are made by young people. If we do not get young researchers in cold fusion, the field will surely die.

  • But are not necessarily more creative, and creativity is the key IMHO.


    It depends on the field. In mathematics, nearly all ground-breaking work is done by people in their 20s. In physics, most big contributions that are later awarded Nobel prizes are done by people in their 20s or 30s. On the other hand, older people often make important contributions to natural science, or archeology.


    Programming calls for stamina and the ability to keep dozens of details together in your mind, so it is usually a young person's game, but some people can manage a software project when they are older. Grace Hopper gave a dazzling lecture in her old age, with many ideas that have still not been developed. And darn well should have been. I don't know if she could have implemented them but she could have kept a dozen top notch programmers at work on them. John Bockis was a slave driver who kept a staff and grad students hard at work in his old age.


    Novelists and painters sometimes get better and better as they get old. Hokusai lived to age 88. Toward the end of his life he said something like, "I am finally learning how to paint."