PATENTS REVEALED No 1.

  • The attached document is an extensive edit and limited re-write of a relatively recent patent showing anomalous heat in hydrogen oxidation reactions using a number of different transition metals as a hydrogen carrier.The inventor claims a COP of between 5 and 10 (approx) using in some cases nothing more exotic than Iron powder laced with a little cobalt. Since the inventor was a calorimeter designer and manufacturer by day, I think we can take that aspect of his work on trust.


    My edit has had the purpose of removing the inevitable and repetitive legalese in the original patent, and making the scientific content clearer and more accessible. Interested parties should 'so to the source' every time. I have the permission of the current assignees to republish the work, which has (I am told) been at least linked here before.



    I think it very interesting indeed, for four reasons. Firstly, it explains (or at least offers a hypothesis for) some anomalous heat events in my own electrolysis experiments, and secondly because -looked at in the right way- it rolls a potential hand-grenade into the ongoing discussion between Abd Lomax and Kirk Shanahan about anomalous heat effects in Palladium electrolysis. The third reason is because there seem to be clear common ground between this and Millsian Hydrino experiments, and the fourth is 'it has nothing (much) to do with Rossi.


    I am hoping to establish contact with a co-worker of the recently deceased inventor, and will report on that if more information results.

  • I have not read your pdf yet, but looking at the subject and the authors, is it related with this:


    Oscillatory Behavior and Anomalous Heat Evolution in Recombination of H2 and O2 on Pd-based Catalysts
    Erwin Lalik*†, Alicja Drelinkiewicz†, Robert Kosydar†, Tomasz Szumełda†, Elżbieta Bielańska†, Dan Groszek‡, Angelo Iannetelli‡, and Martin Groszek
    http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.iecr.5b00686


    And this person: https://www.researchgate.net/r…her/2000695766_AJ_Groszek

  • It's possible for this to be replicated Barty, though I have my hands pretty full at the minute. The demands on equipment and temperatures and pressures are not unreasonable. At the moment my contact with the assignees is via a 3rd party, but this is early days. I only came across the patent a few days ago. We'll see how it goes.


    In answer to another poster, yes IMHO this is 'Black Light Power- Lite'. Hydrinos all the way down.

  • Thanks to gameover for the link to the post by Erwin in July 2015 who appears to be part of a team who have worked on this system. He said:


    One needs to be very careful in proclaiming LENR. I believe the anomalous heat evolution in the oxygen titration may eventually be a result of a LENR phenomenon, but perhaps not in direct way. Let me explain.
    The heat that we have measured for the highest O2 pulses ranged from 1100 kJ/mol O2 to 1200 kJ/mol O2. This is more than twice as much as the heat of gaseous water formation from molecular reagents, i.e., 1/2O2 + H2 = H2O, which is ca. 500 kJ/mol O2. However, it still does not exceed the heat of (gaseous) water formation from atomic reagents. Let us take the reaction of molecular oxygen with atomic hydrogen, i.e., 1/2O2 + 2H = H2O. Now, the standard heat of this reaction is a massive 1354 kJ/mol O2 (or 678 kJ/mol H2). This is because in case of starting from the molecular O2 and H2, a large part of the energy released on the formation of the H2O molecule is actually being used up for braking the bonds in the O2 and H2 themselves, and so only the 500 kJ/mol O2 is left to be measured as the actual thermal effect of reaction. In contrast, when the H2O molecule is being formed from the atomic H and molecular O2, than much more of the H2O bonding energy is being released as a heat of reaction. How much more? It is precisely by the bonding energy in the H2 molecule, which is 436 kJ/mol H2. So the thermal effects we observe for the highest pulses in oxygen titration, say 1200 kJ/mol O2, could be explained as coming from the water formation from the molecular O2 with atomic H (1354 kJ/mol O2). But then, where does the atomic hydrogen species come from, or more precisely, where does the energy necessary to dissociate the H2 molecule come from? Remember, that we only provide molecular H2 to the system.
    For the H-H bond in H2, the bonding energy of 436 kJ/mol makes it be one of the strongest chemical bonds in chemistry. And yet, on several occasions, this strongest bond is being broken effortlessly, as H2 dissociates easily on contact with metals like Pd, Ni or Pt. Not only does this process not require any energy to be absorbed in order to brake the H-H bond, in fact, a heat is actually being released on such reactions; indeed, in the case of Pd/H system the thermal effect of sorption is around 40 kJ/mol H2.
    It seems, therefore, possible, that that a clandestine LENR process may occur in our system. It is hidden behind the H2 dissociation. What we measure calorimetrically may be the heat of water formation from atomic hydrogen species, but the very production of the H-species may be taking energy from compact hydrogen species of a kind postulated by various authors, like hydrino (R. Mills), hydrex (X. Dufour) or tresino (F. Mayer and J. Reitz). Needless to say, this is only a hypothesis currently, and much work is still necessary for it to be verified.


    So there you have it.

  • It's possible for this to be replicated Barty, though I have my hands pretty full at the minute. The demands on equipment and temperatures and pressures are not unreasonable.


    Erwin Lalik, a microcalorimetry expert who has written a few papers with AJ Groszek, did similar experiments using lab-grade synthetic air (80% N2, 20% O2) on alumina-supported, hydrogen saturated Pd catalysts.


    It is possible that the experiment could be approximated with your standard "Model T tubes" by injecting standard air on H-saturated metals. The catch is that the H2-O2 recombination has to occur with µmol-amounts of gas in order to yield an (apparent?) excess.


    I think I recall discussing this with you a few months ago here on LENR-Forum.

  • It's possible for this to be replicated Barty, though I have my hands pretty full at the minute. The demands on equipment and temperatures and pressures are not unreasonable. At the moment my contact with the assignees is via a 3rd party, but this is early days. I only came across the patent a few days ago. We'll see how it goes.



    A serious replication will take a lot of time. As they claim no transmutations to happen, we sail in the Hydrino like water, where we must analyse the surface to look at changes caused by kinetic impacts of the reaction. This needs a lot of time and expensive tools, just to reproduce e.g. a transient effect.


    If it will be possible to show, that e.g. adding O2 is a kind of trigger, it's still worth doing it (repro)!
    Mills has published a wide range of two/three body reactions, with accompanying potentials, which may support hydrino and Dyhydrino catalyzing reactions. Even small parts of impurities are sometimes enough to trigger them.

  • This would also give at least some credence to the various closed cycle overunity water cell/HHO claims of the past decade(s). If the reaction is gainful and reversible it could potentially run only with the electrolysis of water and the recombination of H2-O2 on a suitable catalyst. I think Randell Mills has a patent application and a couple published papers on a similar cell.

  • If anyone else has an interesting but basically unreadable patent (because of legalese and repetitions rather than plain old 'bad science') and think it would benefit from being 'filleted' like the one at the top of this thread please link it here. The particular one I posted has been reduced from 47 to 13 pages - just by doing that. I can't promise to perform surgery on all or any of them, but I would be most interested to see what turns up.


  • Alan Smith,


    In this specific case there is also the benefit of published peer reviewed literature which is probably more clearly written than the patent. The last papers written by Groszek et al. are related to the patent you linked in the opening post.



    Abnormally high heat generation by transition metals interacting with hydrogen and oxygen molecules (2012)
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10450-012-9445-8


    Effect of oxygen on the production of abnormally high heats of interaction with hydrogen chemisorbed on gold (2011)
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apsusc.2010.10.138


    Heats of interaction of hydrogen with gold and platinum powders and its effect on the subsequent adsorptions of oxygen and noble gases (2010)
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apsusc.2009.12.122


    Oscillatory Rates of Heat Evolution during Sorption of Hydrogen in Palladium (2008)
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp805414a


    Heats of displacement of hydrogen from palladium by noble gases (2005)
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apsusc.2005.02.102

  • It's possible that the reduction of oxygen with chemisorbed hydrogen serves for activation of cold fusion in similar way, like the oxidation of luminol for production of visible light - which is also quite rare effect in chemistry. The effect of spontaneous evolution of heat during oxidation of hydrogenated catalyst (Raney nickel) has been reported first by Kokes, P. H. Emmett (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1959, 81 (19)). The nickel-hydrogen system is quite common in organic synthesis and the anomalous evolution of heat were observed multiple-times there (1, 2).

  • Also, what's about Argon's role ?


    A.J Groszek did discover that 'total' hydrogenation of the reaction surface wasn't helpful, and that loosely bound hydrogenneeded to be romoved in order to get the best results. This might suggest that the most energetic reactions were when oxygen reacted with intercalated hydrogen atoms (I think that is the right word) inside the palladium lattice structure. Argon was found to be an excellent atmosphere for the desorption process, though nitrogen is also mentioned. Perhaps argon is simply the most suitable medium for 'washing away' the excess hydrogen, and beyond that has no special role to play?


    I will dig a little deeper on the web.

  • Quote

    [...] then how you break water to recover O2 in 2 steps ?


    This would stray quite a bit from the experiments suggested in the opening post in the patent by A.J. Groszek. but assuming that the Mills-hypothesis of the last few posts is true then one could simply include hydrogen gas with small amounts of water in a small heated chamber and apply electric discharges. As the H2 and H2O start dissociating and recombining, an energy excess would in turn start appearing.


    Groszek also suggests in the patent linked in the opening post that traces amounts of water (0.01 μmol to 100 μmol per gram of metal) appear to increase the energy gain. Would it be plausible if some water molecules get thermally dissociated by the heat of the reaction?

  • -looked at in the right way- it rolls a potential hand-grenade into the ongoing discussion between Abd Lomax and Kirk Shanahan about anomalous heat effects in Palladium electrolysis.


    I just noticed this mention. The conversations between me and Shananan are about a huge body of experimental data, from many researchers, and one more report, unless knockout definitive and confirmed, will not alter this. A patent doesn't increase the probity of a report from an inventor. Patents don't have that purpose, in spite of how some seem to use them. OMG! A Patent! This must be real! The government has approved it!


    No. Not so.


    This is not a negative comment on the patent or the inventor. It is only about the idea that this will somehow massively affect discussions with Kirk Shanahan.