Nickel Compound shows potential for high-temperature superconductivity

  • Materials scientists at Argonne National Laboratory synthesized single crystals of a metallic trilayer nickelate compound, which shows similarities to a technologically valuable class of materials called high-temperature superconductors -- and with the right ingredients, could potentially become one. Above: The crystal structure of such a compound. Credit: Zhang et. al

    A team of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory has identified a nickel oxide compound as an unconventional but promising candidate material for high-temperature superconductivity.

    The team successfully synthesized single crystals of a metallic trilayer nickelate compound, a feat the researchers believe to be a first.

    "It's poised for superconductivity in a way not found in other nickel oxides. We're very hopeful that all we have to do now is find the right electron concentration."

    This nickel oxide compound does not superconduct, said John Mitchell, an Argonne Distinguished Fellow and associate director of the laboratory's Materials Science Division, who led the project, which combined crystal growth, X-ray spectroscopy, and computational theory. But, he added, "It's poised for superconductivity in a way not found in other nickel oxides. We're very hopeful that all we have to do now is find the right electron concentration."

    Mitchell and seven co-authors announced their results in this week's issue of Nature Physics.


    Similar: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nphys4149



    https://m.phys.org/news/2017-0…ial-high-temperature.html





  • Calling Axil to this thread ;)


    Nice find Alan, as I follow this-- but alas like many others that are showing promise or potential it is not clear since i can not read the article.


    Can someone get this article? and post parts that you can? I wish no one to break the paywall but $175 is a bit steep for publicly funded research. But editors have to eat.


    https://www.nature.com/nphys/j…rrent/full/nphys4149.html


    /good find

  • Lou Pagnucco

    Thanks! you are a godsend with the info you find. If I ever see your name I just stop and read. Thanks for taking the time here to find this. I think a fair amount of us if not all follow room higher temp SC. - :)


    I am looking at Jim Gates on fermion and boson equivalence. It may help with understanding cooper pairs, but I am not sure. The first paper just had promising theory but no break through, I am going through the second paper. But we in LENR could use this.

    The post was edited 1 time, last by Rigel: not room temps just higher and than zero by margin (I dream of room temps in my lifetime) ().

  • Rigel . Definitely - we could use it.


    Interestingly I have recently been informally approached about the possibility of doing some related work by a European superconductivity group, though I'm far from sure that it will happen. At least they did not (yet) ask me to provide cryo-equipment, so I can only presume that they are interested in higher-temperature synthesis of likely compounds, which is something I could do (perhaps!). Like you I agree that this whole subject area is very pertinent to LENR in general.

  • "Mimicking cuprates: large orbital polarization in a metallic square-planar nickelate"

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1705.00563

    nterestingly I have recently been informally approached about the possibility of doing some related work by a European superconductivity group, though I'm far from sure that it will happen.


    Some "strange things" must happen dring the build up of the material as they use a LENR active mixture of H2 & Ar, which, under certain conditions, can be used to build up strong fields. Further on during my latest investigations I found that Pr has an extreme low energetic lower nuclear µPr level (base level > 4 is very large) and can participate in a short time high field build up.


    Even more interesting is 142Pr which can switch the nuclear field within a (nuclear) range of 4 keV. Thus I would recommend to add traces of 141Pr to any Ni LENR as a catalyst to support/build up the needed fields.

  • Nickelates share many similarities with cuprates (in history the nickel ores were often confused with these copper ones), but we should keep on mind, it's just a proposal and the nickel compounds tested aren't actually superconductive. The layered perowskite structure isn't everything for superconductivity - the presence of hole atoms (highly oxidized atoms within structure attracting electrons) is also important there. With compare to copper(3+) oxidation state the nickel(4+) state is way less potent in making holes stripes and it attracts electrons in lower extent. We can see, that trilayer structure is not sufficiently negentropic, the working superconductors have way more layers between hole planes The physicists should learn how to do it from people, who already produce room temperature superconductors (1, 2) rather than to reinvent wheel.

  • Quote

    If i have well understood, more layers means higher critical temperature?


    Yes, this relation is known already like so-called Roeser's equation valid for wide spectrum of superconductors.


    swWAf9K.gif


    4 π kme(2 x)2n-2/3 = h2/ Tc where k is Boltzmann's constant, h is Planck's constant, me is the electron mass, x is the doping distance of the crystal and n is the number of supra-conducting layers in the crystal. It is usually 1, 2, or 3 - but Joe Eck struggles to prepare much larger structures with Damascus steel technique.