Ken Shoulders ; The Man Who Made Black Holes

  • You might like this paper axil, a very good description of charge clusters.


    http://www.lenr-canr.org/acrobat/ChiceaDelectroncl.pdf


    The size of the space that is identified to hold 10^8 to 10^13 electons is 1.9x10^29 m-3. The impossibility to confine this density of an aggregation of electrons is a consequence of the coulomb barrier.


    But LENR theorists wrongly insist that extremely high concentrations of electrons are possible. This paper uses the force that such a purported extreme concentration of electrons would trigger the fusion of deuterium. At the time that this paper was written, protium fusion was not widely recognized. This protium fusion is not possible. This removes the basic assumption of fusion as a cause of LENR as put forth by this paper.

  • On E-Cat world a person posted this video, suggesting that it was done by me356:

    https://streamable.com/fh9t8


    It looks like there might be a short gap across which a relatively powerful plasma by high current arc discharge is made.


    Anyway, coincidentally this is roughly how I imagined that a "contained, controlled short circuit" -kind of device could be. It wouldn't have to be fancy. Once metals start vaporizing in the gap, the electrical resistance would decrease dramatically and current would have to be increased to keep it going.


    Practically speaking, how dangerous, what kinds of danger would a similar device pose?

  • The tube looks like alumina, If so the temperature is less that 2000C. To be comparable to the QX, the operating temperature would need to get beyond the vapor temperature of aluminum. It is too bad that all this testing is secret.

  • Mats Lewan is said to have seen the QX produce deep blue color when running at 100%. Even at 30%, the QX produces light at between 400 to 500 nm that I saw recorded with my own eyes recorded on the spectrograph as seen in the video. I don't beleive the info on light production that is coming from Rossi. That info might be self serving. Rossi might be seeing what he wants to see. Rossi says that the light produced was measured at 1100nm. This is infrared light and is not even visible. How can Rossi get a valid blackbody heat reading when the QX is running at 30% power level? Those people who were witnesses at the Demo should have reacted to this discontinuity in logic during the demo in real time. I would have liked to have heard the explanation offered by Rossi. Am I looking at this situation correctly?

    cleardot.gif

  • axil

    Materials other than alumina or similar ceramics would be outside the realm of home-made testing. However, not even a diamond crystal tube (insulator) would be able to sustain such a plasma for too long. Pulsed operation is assumed in all cases.

  • axil

    Materials other than alumina or similar ceramics would be outside the realm of home-made testing. However, not even a diamond crystal tube (insulator) would be able to sustain such a plasma for too long. Pulsed operation is assumed in all cases.


    https://www.americanelements.c…n-nitride-tube-10043-11-5




    Melting Point

    2973 °C


    American Elements manufacturers hot-pressed Boron Nitride Tubes in numerous standard diameters and thicknesses; custom sizes and shapes can also be produced. American Elements can produce materials to custom specifications by request,


    20170103101102_71281.jpg

  • Rossi stated a couple of times he had to invent new materials in order to be able to operate his quark. Does anybody here believe this BS? How can he be able to do things that no one else on Earth was able to do so far? Create super materials that easily can manage thousands of degree C?

    He with his homedepot and radioshack handdmade stuff - it is so hilarious. In Germany there is a colloquial term for such things: Was für ein Quark! or Was für ein Käse! (= what a rubbish). ...

  • Rossi stated a couple of times he had to invent new materials in order to be able to operate his quark. Does anybody here believe this BS? How can he be able to do things that no one else on Earth was able to do so far? Create super materials that easily can manage thousands of degree C?

    He with his homedepot and radioshack handdmade stuff - it is so hilarious. In Germany there is a colloquial term for such things: Was für ein Quark! or Was für ein Käse! (= what a rubbish). ...


    I can't find a capillary tube that can handle a temperature of 3000C and is an insulator, That tube might be the new material that that Rossi was referring to. .

  • Rossi said something like this: "I had to invent new materials", not: "I had to search for and use such new materials"....


    Could Rossi have written a spec to a vendor so that this custom product is used in the Reactor build? Builders or systems integrators do not manufacture their own custom parts, they subcontract them out to an expert fabricator.

  • Materials other than alumina or similar ceramics would be outside the realm of home-made testing.


    Quartz would probably be ok. Same m.p. as Alumina more or less, but the envelope temperature would depend on the duty cycle, at 5-10% on with plenty of off time such a tube would/should survive. After all, quartz envelopes survive tungsten-halogen filaments at 100% duty for thousands of hours, admittedly with a much larger surface area and internal convection cooling.

  • Alan Smith

    Hopefully with possibly several amperes of current being passed through a plasma formed by the particles vaporized inside the gap (according to the idea, at least: highest current possible through the smallest volume possible), off the shelf quartz glass bulbs/tubes would be safe enough to use.


    That made me realize that in a real-world application something similar to a halogen cycle during the "off" periods might be desirable to periodically clean the inner surfaces. Reinventing the light bulb was not the point here, though.

  • This is somewhat similar to 'Shoulders on Steroids'


    Adamenko - Proton 21.


    .....During this same period of time, another group of
    scientists had formed an initiative group that was
    working towards establishing the “Kyiv Laboratory of
    Electrodynamic Studies”, which later became Proton
    21 as a private research laboratory. The Kyiv Labs
    team performed research in the following fields:
    nonequilibrium processes; thermodynamics of flows;
    pulse processes and nonlinear waves in plasma;
    focusing of dense hard-current electron beams,
    collective methods of acceleration; nuclear processes
    in biological systems; physical vacuum and
    elementary particles; two-body nuclear reactions; and
    other problems involved with nuclear synthesis as
    well as synthesis as a phenomenon in itself. ....

    http://www.americanantigravity…s/Proton-21-Interview.pdf

  • Quartz would probably be ok. Same m.p. as Alumina more or less, but the envelope temperature would depend on the duty cycle, at 5-10% on with plenty of off time such a tube would/should survive. After all, quartz envelopes survive tungsten-halogen filaments at 100% duty for thousands of hours, admittedly with a much larger surface area and internal convection cooling.


    Convection happens in crust, it as in a radiator or in a teapot?

    Нефть - это кровь планеты, надо сделать модель планеты и мы получим генератор Тарасенко, эта энергия покорит вселенную! :lenr:

  • Not to mix science with religion but looking around at what looks like the raw material like the waffle rock and the tombstones , also what looks like water floating devices for preparing hematite from iron ore and you can see it in many artifacts and anomalies leaching the iron out of them all over the world. looking at them carefully, they all seem to have a hair size tubes within the small designs and get much bigger with building size anomalies.


    Where some of my research comes from.

  • Alan Smith proton lab could be a good example of how scientist's goals are different from this of general public. I believe I be seen an answer to the question why the lab didn't create anything to solve severe energy issues in Ukraine. The answer was that they did so many exiting experiments that simply analyzing data would take few lives to analyze.

    So they definitely had fun and all we got now is a very expensive 800p book.

  • ...proton lab could be a good example of how scientist's goals are different from this of general public. I believe I be seen an answer to the question why the lab didn't create anything to solve severe energy issues in Ukraine. The answer was that they did so many exiting experiments that simply analyzing data would take few lives to analyze.


    Agreed. A case of 'boys and their toys'. I'm sure it was a lot of fun though.