New Patent Filed by Leif Holmlid

  • THHuxleynew

    Try at least to read the latest published (and open access) review to check out what is the latest thinking on the subject by Holmlid's group:

    https://iopscience.iop.org/art…088/1402-4896/ab1276/meta


    From the references given there relatively to protium, it appears that the existence of UDH was already acknowledged ca. 2009 or about the same time as when Winterberg's theory (an independent effort from Holmlid) came out, so it's not clear what period you're referring to exactly. It's not been introduced recently.

  • THHuxleynew

    Try at least to read the latest published (and open access) review to check out what is the latest thinking on the subject by Holmlid's group:

    https://iopscience.iop.org/art…088/1402-4896/ab1276/meta


    From the references given there relatively to protium, it appears that the existence of UDH was already acknowledged ca. 2009 or about the same time as when Winterberg's theory (an independent effort from Holmlid) came out, so it's not clear what period you're referring to exactly. It's not been introduced recently.


    Can - I know they have morphed the theory to try and make it fit. But that makes it much weaker, and they have no support from other theoreticians. Like marking your own homework.

  • A new peer-reviewed paper got published today:


    https://doi.org//10.1016/j.heliyon.2019.e01864 (open access)

    Decay of muons generated by laser-induced processes in ultra-dense hydrogen H(0)

    Leif Holmlid, Sveinn Olafsson


    Quote

    Abstract: This work reports identification of muons by their characteristic life-time of 2.20 μs after laser-induction of their precursor mesons, both kaons K± and K0LKL0 and pions π± in ultra-dense hydrogen H(0). The pair-production signal from scattered muons at a metal converter in front of a photo-multiplier detector is observed with its decay. The observed signal intensity is decreased by a metal beam-flag which intercepts the meson and muon flux to the detector. Using D(0), the observed decay time is (2.23 ± 0.05) μs in agreement with the free muon lifetime of 2.20 μs. This signal is apparently due to the preferential generation of positive muons. Using p(0), the observed decay time is in the range 1–2 μs, thus shorter than the free muon lifetime, as expected when the signal is mainly caused by negative muons which interact with matter by muon capture.

  • There's an interesting practical observation in the recently released open access paper on https://doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2019.e01864


    Quote

    The ultra-dense material is formed on the upper surface of the H(0) generator. This laser target surface is not rotated. With an H(0) layer on this surface the laser ablation of the metal target is quite weak, and the setup can be used for daily experiments during several weeks with no change in performance.


    This was already hinted in a couple papers by Holmlid from a few years ago, but here it is clearly stated. It might be supportive of Tern Research's earlier observations announced about one and a half years ago, according to which a layer of ultra-dense hydrogen on the target would, only when present in large amounts, substantially increase the amount of time required to bore through a couple mm-thick metallic targets with the focused Nd:YAG laser. This should not be unexpected if the material is as tightly bound as suggested.


    The only issue is that due to all possible surface- and laser-related artifacts it would be difficult to use this property alone as a proof of ultra-dense hydrogen formation.

  • A theoretical open access paper by Holmlid got published today, with deep implications for cosmological processes related with the Big Bang:


    https://doi.org/10.1007/s10509-019-3632-y


    Ultra-dense hydrogen H(0) as dark matter in the universe: new possibilities for the cosmological red-shift and the cosmic microwave background radiation


    Quote

    Abstract: 50 experimental publications exist on ultra-dense hydrogen H(0) from our laboratory. A review of these results was published recently (L. Holmlid and S. Zeiner-Gundersen in Phys. Scr. 74(7), 2019, https://doi.org/10.1088/1402-4896/ab1276). The importance of this quantum material in space is accentuated by a few recent publications: The so called extended red emission (ERE) spectra in space agree well (L. Holmlid in Astrophys. J. 866:107, 2018a) with rotational spectra measured from H(0) in the laboratory, supporting the notion that H(0) is a major part of the dark matter in the Universe. The proton solar wind was shown to agree well with the protons ejected by Coulomb explosions in p(0), thus finally providing a convincing detailed energy mechanism for the solar wind protons (L. Holmlid in J. Geophys. Res. 122:7956–7962, 2017c). The very high corona temperature in the Sun is also directly explained (L. Holmlid in J. Geophys. Res. 122:7956–7962, 2017c) as caused by well-studied nuclear reactions in H(0). H(0) is the lowest energy form of hydrogen and H(0) is thus expected to exist everywhere where hydrogen exists in the Universe. The so called cosmological red-shifts have earlier been shown to agree quantitatively with stimulated Raman processes in ordinary Rydberg matter. H(0) easily transforms to ordinary Rydberg matter and can also form the largest length scale of matter, with highly excited electrons just a few K from the ionization limit. Such electronic states provide the small excitations needed in the condensed matter H(0) for a thermal emission at a few K temperature corresponding to the CMB, the so called cosmic microwave background radiation. These excitations can be observed directly by ordinary Raman spectroscopy (L. Holmlid in J. Raman Spectrosc. 39:1364–1374, 2008b). A purely thermal distribution from H(0) and also from ordinary Rydberg Matter at 2.7 K is the simplest explanation of the CMB. The coupling of electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom observed as in experiments with H(0) gives almost continuous energy excitations which can create a smooth thermal CMB emission spectrum as observed. Thus, both cosmological red-shifts and CMB are now proposed to partially be due to easily studied microscopic processes in ultradense hydrogen H(0) and the other related types of hydrogen matter at the two other length scales. These processes can be repeated at will in any laboratory. These microscopic formation processes are much simpler than the earlier proposed large-scale non-repeatable processes related to Big Bang.

  • Leif Holmlid has just published a new astrophysics paper - mainstream scientists seem to be accepting his work now (at least in astrophysics) - be worth replicating his work now more than anything else because this would establish a basic working theory for not only how Mizuno's reactor works but also the underlying mechanism for all LENR. Then he should be awarded the Nobel Prize.

  • I was going to say the same, that it looks too close to the hydrino ideas from Mills. But also, and not stated explicitly but tacitly, this is another way to say that the Big Bang never happened. The electric universe folks will probably step in to add a thing or two.

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • Not so tacitly:


    Thanks, I had only read the abstract and I was wondering how it got published if it was directly contrary to the “Big Bang church of the late day saints”. Now I am even more puzzled, because it is even suggested by that paragraph of the article. Others were far less successful with their own approach to dismiss the Big Bang even if having a Nobel prize under the belt (I am referring to Hannes Alfven).

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • (moving the discussion from the other thread here)



    Dr Richard

    The instability of the active compound KFeO2 formed on the surface of the potassium-iron oxide catalysts used by Holmlid comes from it being highly hygroscopic and sensitive at atmospheric temperatures to even slightly moist nitrogen, in addition to CO2 also when dry (so, basically air). It's in part mentioned in this paper in section 2.1. Following exposure it decomposes and must be reformed at higher temperatures e.g. also under typical reaction conditions.


    So on this respect it sounds similar to the active materials in many gas-loaded LENR experiments or perhaps—as far as it's been reported—even to Mizuno's mesh. However a high vacuum to restore its function is not required, at least at high temperatures (at low temperatures it might take a very long time even in an UHV).


    According to Holmlid, catalysts that are capable of efficiently dissociating molecular hydrogen into the atomic state while preventing recombination in desorption should be suitable. On this regard check out section 4 in the latest general review of the subject or try searching (CTRL+F) for the text associated with "covalent" in his latest patent application.


    One thing that is not mentioned in his most recent publications focused on ultra-dense hydrogen is that he deliberately admits or forms hydrocarbons in the chamber to some extent (or at least, he used to), which crack on the catalysts and hot surfaces in contact with them, forming a thin graphite layer. In limited and controlled amounts this carbon deposition can be beneficial for the catalytic processes initially involved in the reaction; hydrogen spillover effects may also happen on this deposited layer, etc.


    This might inadvertently occur over prolonged periods of time in a high or UHV vacuum system with inefficient or malfunctioning pump oil trap, but if with the burnished substrates in Mizuno-type experiments the reaction occurs at the NAE/gaps/voids formed at the interface between both materials like Edmund Storms suggests, such active environments should be pretty much screened from outside impurities.

  • can you said about Holmlid:


    According to Holmlid, catalysts that are capable of efficiently dissociating molecular hydrogen into the atomic state while preventing recombination in desorption should be suitable. On this regard check out section 4 in the latest general review of the subject or try searching (CTRL+F) for the text associated with "covalent" in his latest patent application.


    So, if, for example, you use an SS tube to do instable mono atomic hydrogen through, then you stabilize them by adding electrons ( H+ becomes H-) from an alcali layer , you should do something interesting ?

    Especially if this alkali layer is also the trap (interface with the SS tube) where next, these H- become H0 :)

  • Cydonia

    If you mean making hydrogen permeate through a stainless steel layer (used as a sort of membrane) and desorb in the atomic state in a low-density alkali atmosphere , it might be possible that the atoms can desorb as clusters. From Holmlid's obervations, it should be in general more easily accomplished if the atoms desorb from a metal oxide or carbon/graphite layer.


    In older studies focused on Rydberg matter of hydrogen (before he realized that an ultra-dense form existed) he sometimes mentioned that he applied colloidal graphite (Aquadag) on hot parts near the catalyst pellet(s) or at the laser "dump" (a cone on the back of the chamber used to reduce laser light reflections). Either by strongly heating the graphite with the laser in a hydrogen atmosphere, or by catalytic reactions with it (when placed on heated parts near the catalyst), hydrocarbons would form over time to some extent and eventually decompose also on the surface of the catalyst, forming a thin layer.


    See the attached excerpts from these 15 year-old papers:

  • can

    yes, carbon's topic comes back often but I have no particular idea on this.

    About SS tube need to do H+ across , it's just an own improvement from Chauvin's Patent you already shared here.

    To be back with carbon's topic, the question should be rather : why Holmlid did he think of putting carbon to increase RM desorption ?

  • To be back with carbon's topic, the question should be rather : why Holmlid did he think of putting carbon to increase RM desorption ?


    Possibly also due to hydrogen spillover effects as the atoms dissociated at the active catalyst sites would migrate on the carbon layers formed. The possible positive role of suitable carbon layers (even deposited from hydrocarbons during reaction conditions, not just the catalyst support) has been highlighted in the catalyst literature too.


    His early studies with thermionic emitters were of desorption of alkali atoms as clusters (Rydberg matter) from graphite and graphite-covered metal surfaces. No Rydberg clustering would occur from pure metals without a graphite layer. From the previously linked review:


  • can

    you saw " graphite so carbon" i saw also another keyword in you file attached.

    Work function and efficiency thermionic, told me more too :)

    It seems that carbon appears just as a way to improve electron's product by lowering work function so easily product thermionic electrons.

    it sticks again with my understanding ; first you make unstable H monoatomic then you fill it by adding 1 more electron with alkali species ( or active species...)

    Unstable H+ become more stable H-, it's crazy as it sticks well with Chauvin's work and before Piantelli.

    H- remains more stable, more longer than H+ but he will plan to find a new balance.

    Then at this stage, not a lot of things will help it to become H0 sckrinked as IRs for example.