Mats Lewan: New Energy World Symposium,

  • But on the topic of LENR, I think we should have something very surprising and easy to do to show in Stockholm too. Full reveal then- and I mean full description of every aspect, but right now we have de-bugging and system reliability tests to run.


    Alan,


    Does this mean you will be showing clear proof of LENR using your LFH equipment?

  • Allan,,

    For your Al can recycling a question:


    If you limit recycling to 75% is this a single melt?

    If it is, then a sale at $600/ton seems fairly profitable considering the energy to melt is from combustion rather than electricity.


    The remaining Al-C can be leached with either acid or base for further recovery. This is likely too messy and energy intensive to go from an aluminum salt back to metal.

  • DAK2 A good question that deserves a detailed answer.


    The cost of running a smelter are much higher than the gas cost. The articles/research paper linked below gives you some idea of the range of both primary and secondary costs, which while smaller than the cost of gas alone are quite high. To turn this into 'real' figures see my calculations below. I have tried to be conservative on expenses and generous on sale value of recovered metal (more generous than you and a little better than current market prices) and transport costs. I base all my own calculations for input costs on the $400/tonne figure btw, and the 15% 'dross loss' figure is typical of a good operation, not a bad one. In my process there is no dross loss or disposal cost at all, since there is none, and because of the conversion from aluminium metal to aluminium oxide we end up with more tonnes of output than we do of input, rather than losing materials to the angels and the spoil heaps.


    BTW, recovery of metals from slag by acid pickling etc is worthwhile only for higher value and more easily reduced metals in general. Also the cost of the input chemicals, treatment tanks, and post-treatment and disposal of the heavily contaminated (I'm sure you can imagine) process water can be very high. As you suggest, not practical here, or indeed anywhere but a gold mine or perhaps a copper mine in a low-wage and low environmental standards country.


    Cost of crushed and baled cans delivered to site. $400/tonne. Sale price of ingots delivered to end user $800/tonne. Gross Margin $400/tonne.


    Less. Cost of smelting losses as dross etc (15%) calculated as loss of sale value (since it has been through all operations before separation from the output) $120: Cost of dross disposal $10: Cost of shredding and de-lacquering, $20/tonne: Cost of fuel. $50/tonne: Cost of fluxing materials $20/tonne : Cost of labour for entire operation $50/tonne: Cost of delivery to end user $40/tonne: Wear, tear, repair and depreciation of equipment $10/tonne. This gives us a total cost of $320/tonne.


    Final figure Gross profit $400 - $320 = $80 net profit on sales, less insurance, administration, bank charges, interest/loan repayments, taxes and environmental charges etc. you would hope to end up with (possibly) $70/tonne. Which unless you are smelting 50+ tonnes/day is a scarily thin margin, and even then requiring a very hard-nosed approach to operational matters.


    This is why cans are stockpiled, waiting for secondary metal ingot prices to hit $1000/tone or more, or only smelted by companies that can - because they have the hi-tech plant to do it - can transform ingots into high-value rolled plate etc.






    http://www.afsinc.org/about/content.cfm?ItemNumber=10465


    And a highly detailed look at combustion chemistry and mechanics.


    https://www.sciencedirect.com/…cle/pii/S1359431110004746

  • Alan,


    I am still excited about the process you and your friends invented, and this has nothing to do with what you are about to launch, but...


    what if I told you of someone I know, who could turn organic waste (tires, wood, plastics, etc.) into oil, gas, coal, solvents, and gold and silver? Yes, I said gold and silver. Metals. Valuable metals. From biological waste?

  • Alan,


    I am still excited about the process you and your friends invented, and this has nothing to do with what you are about to launch, but...


    what if I told you of someone I know, who could turn organic waste (tires, wood, plastics, etc.) into oil, gas, coal, solvents, and gold and silver? Yes, I said gold and silver. Metals. Valuable metals. From biological waste?

    Shane,


    What I’m realky looking for is a process that can change nickel to copper,

    If I had that, it would really be something.

  • Shane,


    What I’m realky looking for is a process that can change nickel to copper,

    If I had that, it would really be something.


    Roseland,


    I knew a guy who used to do that (turn Ni into Cu). But sorry, that was in 2012, and he has added some ingredients since then. Hopefully you can find what you are looking for.

  • Roseland67, you are looking for is a process that can change nickel to copper.


    Why bother, a nickel already contains 75% copper?


    Before 1856 you could have changed your nickels to pennies made from copper only.

    Today they contain only 3.5% copper.


  • Thx for posting H-G,


    Interesting line-up. Better yet, only one reference to Rossi! My hats off to Mats Lewan for hosting this. Mostly presentations of "what if's"....when LENR is finally accepted, and more importantly, how it will help, or disrupt the world order. The agenda reminds me somewhat LENR Cities before their liquidation.


    Good to talk about those things, but to get them in the door, you need some "meat and potatoes". Something they can sink their teeth into. And it looks as if Alan Smith is set to provide that with his two presentations. Although my guess is that BG (abstract not yet available) may well bring a side dish or two.

  • Quote

    Andrea Rossi
    January 17, 2018 at 2:33 AM

    Mats Lewan:

    Thank you for the information,

    Warm Regards,

    A.R.

  • Considering how enamored and supportive of Rossi Mats Lewan is, I would expect Rossi to be a major participant with a keynote speech and a demonstration of a megawatt QuarkX in a small glass bottle followed by an open question and answer period during which Rossi is discouraged from evading questions. Yes, sure, I expect that. :-)

  • Snoopy,


    I do not understand some things myself, but in fairness to Lewan, he has made it a point to say this conference is*NOT* about Rossi. He obviously understands that many are turned off to that name. Those thinking of attending (if still on) can make their decision knowing it is about new energy.


    Also, our Alan Smith will debut his new clean recycling process (if still on track) at the symposium, and we do not want to take the limelight off him with this talk of the other guy.