The LION experiment

  • LENR is an extremely vague term to describe a wide range of different nuclear reactions. The problem is that we don't have the reactions pinned down at all, so we can't differentiate well what exactly is happening. What I'm saying is that EVOs produce a wide range of stimulation that seems to induce one or more nuclear reactions which fall under the general term LENR - even though a few of these possible nuclear reactions could be deemed a little more hot.


    As I've said before, EVOs are the shotgun approach to LENR. Basically, imagine trying to kill a werewolf without knowing what type of metal worked. One solution could be to make a shot gun cartridge with pellets of dozens of different elements. You might not be able to pin down what element slayed the monster, but you would end up alive and the werewolf would be dead. This is what I'm saying is probably the case with EVOs and LENR. Except that I expect that a few different types of pellets in the cartridge are effective at inducing LENR to various degrees.

  • LENR is an extremely vague term to describe a wide range of different nuclear reactions. The problem is that we don't have the reactions pinned down at all, so we can't differentiate well what exactly is happening. What I'm saying is that EVOs produce a wide range of stimulation that seems to induce one or more nuclear reactions which fall under the general term LENR - even though a few of these possible nuclear reactions could be deemed a little more hot.


    As I've said before, EVOs are the shotgun approach to LENR. Basically, imagine trying to kill a werewolf without knowing what type of metal worked. One solution could be to make a shot gun cartridge with pellets of dozens of different elements. You might not be able to pin down what element slayed the monster, but you would end up alive and the werewolf would be dead. This is what I'm saying is probably the case with EVOs and LENR. Except that I expect that a few different types of pellets in the cartridge are effective at inducing LENR to various degrees.

    There are some low powered LENR systems where EVO's are not produced like bacteria and the the-dennis-cravens-golden-ball-reaction (see below). How can you explain that?


    The Dennis Cravens Golden Ball reaction

  • Diamonds have a low work function but are not conductors.


    Certainly diamonds such as natural type IIa, across specific planes / axes, are among the world's best electrical insulators, shared with some varieties of polystyrene and perhaps ultraclean PTFE. Low electron emission work function is often identified with high bulk electrical resistivity.


    But, thermally diamonds can be the worlds best conductors:


    https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920000747


    https://www.google.com/url?sa=…Vaw2Dvi0JrXGXALq9PlIXfynq


    Thermal conductivity, especially in specific orientations is closely associated with effective electron mass. Apparently reprising aspects of W-L theory.





  • There are some low powered LENR systems where EVO's are not produced like bacteria and the the-dennis-cravens-golden-ball-reaction (see below). How can you explain that?


    The Dennis Cravens Golden Ball reaction

    I have not said that EVOs explain every single anomalous nuclear effect, but they seem to be a unifying mechanism among a broad range of LENR systems. Since EVOs can scale down so small, I don't dismiss the idea of bacteria producing "heavy electron" like clusters that can induce transmutations. I don't know a huge amount about Craven's experiment.

  • The transmutation of e;ements withing living systems is currently an area that has recaptured the interest of a number of researchers, particularly in the old Soviet Bloc countries. I have no opinion of the validity of the research, except to say that I have met one of its foremost scientists, Vladimir Vyssotsky and found him to be very smart and very diligent in his approach to everything he does.


    Here btw, is a US Army research paper on the topic. http://rexresearch.com/goldfein/goldfein.htm