Atom-Ecology

  • Russ George

    If you have a bit of time now, could you explain a bit about the "ecology" in "atom-ecology"? I'm not sure why that word is there. I am interested in why you think multiple nuclides are needed for LENR. Is this essential or does using a mix of nuclides all at once just shorten the search for something active?

  • A bit of time... sadly that era is over as more new reactor protocols are being baked. A second better Gamma Spectrometer has been ordered so as to provide a larger range as well as a coincident measure. The woods are lovely, dark and deep, But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep. These words are the only sign of Frost as things are heating up.

  • A bit of time... sadly that era is over as more new reactor protocols are being baked. A second better Gamma Spectrometer has been ordered so as to provide a larger range as well as a coincident measure. The woods are lovely, dark and deep, But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep. These words are the only sign of Frost as things are heating up.


    OK. Perhaps the next blog entry on your atom-ecology site could address this?

  • OK. Perhaps the next blog entry on your atom-ecology site could address this?

    Like ecology as a scientific discipline in a number of venues understanding it cannot be reduced to a sound byte but here's a try. My entire atom-ecology blog is directed at understanding my view on atom-ecology as a pioneering effort into understanding nuclear science not in the deminimus form that makes reductionist math simple but rather in the holistic form where myriad factors are engaged and as such this indeed does make simple/conventional math/physics nigh unto impossible as a definitive tool. Nucleosynthesis does not take place by virture of a marriage of two, creation of new isotopes comes about as a result of dirty complicated myriad interactions of many, heaven forbid. Take some inspiration from the ocean when during a particular phase of the moon the gametes from countless individuals amongst vast numbers of species are released into their common ecosystem/soup. The majority of nature prefers a rave to a romance in life and in nucleosynthesis.

  • Russ George

    You are absolutely right. I am indeed finding that my learning curve in atom-ecology is proving difficult!


    I see that you often refer to ecology and atom-ecology on your blog. But despite reading some of your posts I am still having trouble getting to the heart of the idea. Can you suggest one or two of the posts where I could best devote some time to try and get this concept on board?

  • The heart of the matter is very simple, I think you are looking too hard. Look at the forest, not the individual trees. The uber-reductionist approach to LENR views it as a 2-body problem, D+D=He, almost as it it were simple chemistry. The atom ecology view is that LENR requires many bodies, the presence of reactants and also their choice and positioning as well as the creation of an environment (temperature, pressure, etc.) which fosters favourable niches. Niches is of course a familiar term borrowed from ecology. Here taken to mean places where special states of matter can be created, states in which the Coulomb barrier can be overcome, or in which it ceases for all practical purposes to exist. Creation of these niches might well involve complex fuel mixtures and untypical energy input regimes, both of these being part our research.

  • Well, it certainly fits at least one of the hypercycle criteria in that we seek to create a non-linear reaction network with unique properties, and from that one might hypothesize that once established this network becomes self-organising and self-maintaining. It is certainly true to say that our now 2 month old part-gram of fuel is now in a different state to the initial one, as witnessed by the fact that the gammas spectra have evolved over time and now look somewhat different. All this means we have a lot of work to do, many more experiments - right now we could do with a dozen or so skilled technicians and 4 times the space. But, regardless we do the best we can by adopting a fairly strong approach to time management.

  • The heart of the matter is very simple, I think you are looking too hard. Look at the forest, not the individual trees. The uber-reductionist approach to LENR views it as a 2-body problem, D+D=He, almost as it it were simple chemistry. The atom ecology view is that LENR requires many bodies, the presence of reactants and also their choice and positioning as well as the creation of an environment (temperature, pressure, etc.) which fosters favourable niches. Niches is of course a familiar term borrowed from ecology. Here taken to mean places where special states of matter can be created, states in which the Coulomb barrier can be overcome, or in which it ceases for all practical purposes to exist. Creation of these niches might well involve complex fuel mixtures and untypical energy input regimes, both of these being part our research.


    The spheromak is the repetitive form factor that composes every body in this LENR ecology. Atoms, sub-atomic particles, electrons, and even other more exotic particles utilize variations of this structure. By understanding how spheromaks are fundamental to our physical reality on potentially all scales, from the aether to the galactic cluster, we can start to understand not only the niches that allow for these game-changing nuclear phenomena to take place but the fundamental mechanisms that are taking place. Only when we finally learn exactly how hyperluminal particles are zipping between nuclei, undergoing absorption, being digested, and ejected again will we start being able to grasp the true nature of the universe -- not to mention cold fusion.

  • You don't think entangled particles are truly interacting over long distances magically without a physical mechanism for information exchange? The universe is filled with stuff and the matter distributed in our universe is composed of this same stuff -- call it aether particles, gyrons, or whatever you want.