Brillouin Energy Corporation (BEC) updates.

  • Another update from Brillouin at LinkedIn (requires account login) :

    "BEC is looking for people with a nuclear physics or like background to provide feedback and or suggestions for a test we are undertaking. See attached PDF".


    Focussing on proof of controlled low energy (cold) neutron production in their reactors.
    Another small step to get recognition of their invented technololgy.

  • Another update from Brillouin at LinkedIn (requires account login) :

    Brillouin states

    "A recent peer reviewed study published in the preeminent journal Physics Review C - Nuclear fusion reactions in deuterated metals
    - provides an initial stepping stone across the schism
    between academics and the possibility of driving a nuclear reaction in a metallic lattice. If BEC
    demonstrates production of cold neutrons, it provides the next stepping stone across that schism."


    however the Vladimir Pines Theory explains nuclear reactions in terms of conventional huge kinetic energy of 2 .45 Mevs

    which is more than one stepping stone away from the kinetic energy of cold neutrons.. at <<< 1 eV

    perhaps there is a magnetic SO(4) stepping stone involved? and no neutron leap of faith.

    Brillouin states

    "

    The best way to detect these neutrons is to use a common gamma spectrometer. "

    Hopefully Brillouin examines what happens to the Pd and Ni gamma spectra as well as those of In115 and In116 in the 10 - 400 KEV range..



    https://www.researchgate.net/p…M5Io9s_d7XMoCubX9A&_iepl=



  • Different spectrum should clarify, hydrogen in some temporary shrunken state could similarly give results like slow neutrons. A proton electron pare is neutral, just that unlike neutrons a hydrogen atom interacts chemically and magnetically with Pd, comparable metallic or hydrogen atom.

  • I think it likely that Brillouin will find a lot more than the expected Indium 116 peaks


    the data will be difficult to sort out into a significant sign of 'cold' neutron transmutation of Indium115.


    It would be interesting for them to add silver the Pd/Ni rods.. and also look at the gamma spectrum

    That would quickly whittle down the options!

  • That would quickly whittle down the options!

    Not really .. there are a host of nuclear isomers with low lying gamma states...

    in that critical 10-500 kev range

    among the natural isotopes of hf, yb.. sn .. fe..etc


    and some that could be manufactured in situ by proton addition eg Pd106 +H>>. Ag 107 ... Ag107m-(93 kev)

    which might possibly arise if the reactor was run for a long time..

  • I think it likely that Brillouin will find a lot more than the expected Indium 116 peaks


    the data will be difficult to sort out into a significant sign of 'cold' neutron transmutation of Indium115.


    Did you correctly read ?? These lines are not in the Indium spectrum!


    This is for adding a proton H* to get 116Sn! - a loss of value...

  • Did you correctly read ?? These lines are not in the Indium spectrum!

    they are a spectrum from in 116m..

    Definitely not on the livechart In116 gamma or decay info.


    The authors of this chart called them photopeaks

    https://www.researchgate.net/p…rdan_subcritical_assembly

    found for example 138.3 ,416.9 peaks

    which are shown here

    http://nucleardata.nuclear.lu.se/toi/nuclide.asp?iZA=490416


    Perhaps I will talk to Steve Sesselmann about it.. complicated stuff.

    lenr-forum.com/attachment/13293/

  • The authors of this chart called them photopeaks

    https://www.researchgate.net/p…rdan_subcritical_assembly

    found for example 138.3 ,416.9 peaks


    The "problem" is that this radiation is follow up radiation of a decay. This allways does contain daughter gamma ray energies. The only problem is that the beta energy is not fix and thus the spectrum has some variations. The spectrum is correct if we assume 115In +n --> 116In --> 116Sn.

  • The spectrum is correct if we assume 115In +n --> 116In --> 116Sn.

    Thanks.. I now 'read' that 138.3 and 416.9 kev(and the others) are peaks from Sn116

    eight out of about 469 gamma peaks.

    and not part of the 120 or so Indium116 peaks

    (lthe downloadable spreadsheets are handy)


    of course livechart does not explain the basis

    for the size of the energy transitions..

    .. its not in the Standard Model..

  • I had not seen this, nothing new though. BEC has been really quiet lately.


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  • Some very shallow update indicated by Francis Tanzella during the recent interview with Alan, Ruby and David.

    Frank Tanzella has also evaluated and tested the Brillouin Hot-Tube energy generator now in development by Brillouin Energy Corporation and continues to evaluate various technologies vying to find the recipe to clean energy from the hydrogen in water.


    Frank explained that currently the active electrode consists of a copper core covered with a material that has a high dielectric constant which in turn is covered by a nickel layer.
    The applied electronic pulses should have a very high rise and fall time to emit an as wide as possible frequency spectrum (as defined by Fourier transforms).

    At (very) high frequencies the skin effect occurs, moving most electrons to the very thin outer surfaces of the electrode, meaning the flow of electrons flow mostly at the skin of the material(s), which in this case is likely including the boundary of the nickel and dielectric layer. This is probably the area where 'the magic' occurs. But also the border between the nickel layer and the water probably is included in the desired effects since here the hydrogen is produced.

    One of the obstacles of course is that the bigger the electrodes are the bigger the capacitor value of the stack is, which frustrates high rise and fall times of the applied pulses. One possible way to decrease this capacitor value is to apply several smaller cathodes and connect the layer structures in series. But that requires a higher pulse voltage to reach the same voltage amplitude over one stack unit.


    Any suggestions what kind of physics is occurring here?
    (should be related to fusion since Helium production is claimed)

  • Are we sure it's standard helium being produced and do alpha-emitting elements persist in any segment of the process?


    Robert Godes models his Brillouin Hot Tube technology with a Controlled Electron Capture process, but others have different models. The actual theory is still unknown.

    I wouldn't say it's entirely unknown.