Room-Temperature Superconductivity

  • Jones Beene spotted a really interesting paper (on vortex-l):

    https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1807/1807.08572.pdf


    Besides being well-written and documented, it seems to describe the holy grail - repeatable fully characterized room temperature superconductivity. In particular, look at figure S7C in the end section. The vertical scale is mis-labeled but the transition temperature measured to be 320 K has got to be a world record!


    Replication, anyone? (just kidding unfortunately).

  • Besides being well-written and documented, it seems to describe the holy grail - repeatable fully characterized room temperature superconductivity.


    To be exact: They write "the signs of room temperature super conductivity". See their conclusion given next line:


    "In conclusion, we describe observations that strongly suggest the emergence of superconductivity in an Au-Ag based material at ambient temperature and pressure conditions."


    What we know its that the energy transport mechanism in the SC build up phase can also be use to ignite LENR. In the SC build up phase a spin currents may synchronize more than 10e12 electrons, what even at energy levels of 10e-7 Volts/electron can result in a strong (total) stimulation.

  • What is electricity?


    One definition would be the motion of charged particles such as electrons.


    However, I don't think we will truly understand superconductivity until we realize that electron current is only a byproduct of electricity and not electricity itself. There is a force pushing the electrons from one end of a conductor to another and there is a carrier of this force. Once we gain an understanding of the structure and dynamics of the aether, we will be able to design all sorts of "super conducting" materials -- if we have not already with what has been described by some as "cold electricity."

  • If a superconductor has zero resistance, can it be infinitesimally thin, and still transmit a useful amount of power?

    Sorry, no. Superconductors have a limiting magnetic field that limits how high you can make the current density. Current carrying capacity increases as you chill the material below its nominal superconducting temperature. There are superconductors that work at LN2 temperature (77K) but do not have useful current carrying capacity at that temperature. This is why MRI machines still use expensive LHe.

  • My surmise: a single (i.e. one shot) very brief, super-critical discharge, that is, far above the critical current density for sustained superconductivity, might "sneak through" via some mechanism. Perhaps transient transmission of the excess "supercritical" current pulse via surface "image" positive charges traveling via relatively immobile positive ion to ion "hand offs", which might remain at least charge balanced by above -surface mobile electron flights. That is likely to be expected, and likely seen many times.


    More difficult and more interesting, and showing only when the superconductive critical current density is exceeded, but before thermal destruction of the SC state, and at very high transient field gradients, one might observe near condensed surface the equivalent of "vacuum" or diffuse plasma pair (e+ and e-) production. Perhaps further enhanced by surface oscillating square waves (many examples in LENR, including the Lipinski patent). Hypothetically, at least a relatively easy positron and/or electron escape in the context of such surface condensed lepton / ion charge mobilities.


    As many here know, that is not really relevant for sustained power use or production. On the other hand, it could easily provide useful information on materials and processes for further R&D. An "interface" or surface-associated field gradient of great intensity, yes. The possibility of released leptonic charges, yes. Over-unity spikes, sure, from several sources including store / release, measure errors in charge-noisy, EMF-noisy environments.


    But net, overall, energy gain? Perhaps not as easily, if at all. But still it is here that the information and "theorizing" provided by "Eros" is worthy of some attention and perhaps further, and a bit less "hopeful" empirical effort.

  • More difficult and more interesting, and showing only when the superconductive critical current density is exceeded, but before thermal destruction of the SC state, and at very high transient field gradients, one might observe near condensed surface the equivalent of "vacuum" or diffuse plasma pair (e+ and e-) production.


    There is a lot of literature about SC in arXiv especially written by Hirsch.


    As a starter: arXiv:1201.0139v1


    For people interested in the phenomena I recommend that they first read through it (and the other arXiv SC papers by Hirsch). Hirsch, in an other paper, also makes speculations about e+-e- pair production in a strong SC field. But he mixed up some formulas... Nevertheless, in the limit SC and LENR are very similar as both are spin effects.

  • Hi Robert. I don't do Twittering, so can only read the paper you link. Surely it is not unusual for the s/n ratio to decrease as the signal increases in strength? It can be a function of equipment quality and method, I am well aware that the superconductivity field is as full of backbiting and competition for resources as the LENR field, having had extensive email dialogues with several key players, so wary of any criticism coming from someone claiming to post it a critique 'at the urging of a colleague'. And MIT are no angels I'm afraid.

  • The unusual part is not the s/n ratio change. It is that the green and blue dots, from two different independent experiments show exactly the same random noise, but with an offset. If you think of the up/down variation from sample to sample as determined by flipping a coin, for the flat part of the curve they flipped it about a hundred times for the green experiment, and when they did the blue experiment they got exactly the same sequence. The twitter feed shows a zoomed in version where you can see that more clearly.


    DkMyGCFVAAAaF12.jpg:large