LENR vs Solar/Wind, and emerging Green Technologies.

  • Edo If you wish to make claims here, be so good as to provide data. This way we can evaluate your claims.


    The world has lost one-third of its forest, but an end of deforestation is possible Over the last 10,000 years the world has lost one-third of its forests. An area twice the size of the United States. Half occurred in the last century. ourworldindata.org


    The world has lost one-third of its forest, but an end of deforestation is possible
    Over the last 10,000 years the world has lost one-third of its forests. An area twice the size of the United States. Half occurred in the last century.
    ourworldindata.org


    Good find! This document says what I have been saying, and what I plan to say at ICCF24.


    QUOTE


    In fact, the world may have already passed ‘peak agricultural land’ [we will look at this in more detail in an upcoming post]. And with the growth of technological innovations such as lab-grown meat and substitute products, there is the real possibility that we can continue to enjoy meat or meat-like foods while freeing up the massive amounts of land we use to raise livestock.




    That plus indoor farming can reduce agricultural land by a huge extent. There would still be some land needed, for things like orchards.


    Cold fusion could greatly enhance indoor farming, and it could increase verdant land with desalination. Desalination has to be done carefully, to avoid adding salt to the soil. I think with high temperature, energy intense cold fusion methods this could be done.

  • I think with high temperature, energy intense cold fusion methods this could be done.

    By "high temperature" I mean distillation methods.


    There are two ways to do desalination: reverse osmosis and distillation. Reverse osmosis takes less energy. I think it is more common these days.


    I do not know the engineering details, but my guess is that with cold fusion we could afford to use both methods, in stages. First reverse osmosis, and then distilling the output from that. The goal would be to produce water as pure as rain, with as low salt content. Maybe some sort of filtering technique through sand or soil would also be needed. I wouldn't know. The point is, we could use extravagant amounts of energy, with methods that would be uneconomical today.


    Rainfall from hurricanes near the ocean sometimes has a lot of salt in it. In the Inland Sea in Japan, rain mixed with seawater sometimes kills of patches of bamboo a good distance inland.


    Some experts are saying we should concentrate on cleaning up wastewater and reusing it, rather than desalinating ocean water. That is what they are doing in Los Angeles. That sounds like a good idea, but you could not do that to irrigate vast areas of the Sahara and Gobi deserts, which is what I propose to do.

  • One man's opinion...reproduced with permission.


    May 24, 2022


    The biggest differences between LANR and hot fusion are that LANR

    is clean and achievable now, and has already had open demonstrations

    of this, and has already proven this both by driven over-unity motors

    and over-unity electricity production systems.


    LANR is understood and controllable if one understands the mathematics

    and materials (sort of like driving an LED actually).

    Any piece of clean palladium and clean heavy water can be used to

    get XSH (absent quenching materials) to learn and perhaps discover.


    What is coming in metallurgy and electrical engineering control and diagnostics

    will be very insightful.


    We are very close to CLEAN breakeven ["home run"] for dry preloaded

    LANR components -- something which hot fusion will probably only dream

    about for the next few millennia.


    Mitchell Swartz


      

  • European steelmakers need to reconsider their decarbonization strategies because of rising natural-gas and electricity prices, as well as potential limitations on the natural-gas supply.


    Safeguarding green steel in Europe: Facing the natural-gas challenge
    For the future of green steel, European steelmakers must respond to the limitations of natural gas and reassess their decarbonization strategies.
    www.mckinsey.com

  • Fusion tech may be geo thermal breakthrough.


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  • By 2030

    That is a very short time, almost unachievable goal, for Rolls Royce to offer a complete line of all electric (no hybrid) vehicles. They will not have an internal combustion engine anywhere in their portfolio by 2030.

    Unbelievable, they state no change in weight, size or performance. Nowhere do they address the most important feature for door to door uninterrupted luxury, which is range. Only with a CMNS Electric energy technology on board charger will Rolls Royce be able to keep it's promise. All electric line up with no loss of luxury (size and weight) or performance (power and range).


    Solar Wind powered charging stations won't do it.


    Rolls Royce has identified this problem. To date, NO solution to that hurdle to "keep a promise" and "deliver on time" has been presented. I predict it will be announced within one year, following ICCF - 24.


    Rolls Royce prides itself on meeting deadlines, keeping its promises and delivering on time.


    ROLLS-ROYCE MOTOR CARS PRESSCLUB ·

    ROLLS-ROYCE AND ELECTRIC POWER: A PROPHECY, A PROMISE AND AN UNDERTAKING

    27.09.2021 PRESS RELEASE

    Rolls-Royce reflects on heritage of electric power ahead of historic announcement. Electrification has long been promoted as the future of automotive propulsion. Ahead of further official statements, we invite the media to reflect on the marque’s unique heritage in electric power, which pre-dates the founding of Rolls-Royce the company itself, and involves many of the principal protagonists whose names are forever associated with it.


    “In April 1900, our founding forefather, Charles Rolls, made a prescient prophecy about automotive electrification. Move forward over 120 years to when I made a public promise, on the record, that we would bring the first fully electric Rolls‑Royce to market within the current decade. And, right now, our company is embarking on an historic undertaking to create the first, super-luxury car of its type. This will happen sooner than many thought possible, through the incredible skills, expertise, vision and dedication of our engineers, designers and specialists at the Home of Rolls-Royce.



    "In this ground-breaking endeavour, we are drawing on a remarkable heritage, unique in our industry. Our founders and those who worked alongside them in the marque's formative years were all important pioneers of electric power, as well as their era's leading experts in automotive engineering. As we herald a new electric future at Rolls-Royce, I am proud and humbled to share their inspiring stories, which have never been told in one place before, and shine a fresh and fascinating light on our company's earliest days."


    Torsten Müller-Ötvös, Chief Executive Officer, Rolls-Royce Motor Cars


    QUOTE (press release 2021)


    WHY ELECTRIC POWER?

    The internal combustion engine (ICE) was not the only, nor the default, means of propulsion for early motor cars at the beginning of the 20th century. Indeed, in the early 1900s engineers and manufacturers initially divided their loyalties precisely between three competing technologies: the ICE, steam power and electricity.

    Steam power, though well understood, relatively sophisticated and, at the time, ubiquitous in industry and other forms of transport, quickly proved less practical for use in motor cars. It therefore fell to internal combustion and electricity to vie for supremacy.


    Electric power lost the battle for two main reasons: extremely limited range and the absence of a charging infrastructure. A century later, despite significant advances, these remain as barriers to widespread adoption (although increasingly less so), both in terms of technology and consumer perception.


    But the characteristics that first drew engineers to electric power – silent operation, instant torque, tremendous power and the absence of exhaust fumes – remain highly alluring, particularly for luxury motor cars. Indeed, some have speculated that, had he been able to solve the range and charging issues, Sir Henry Royce might have chosen electric power alone for his motor cars.


    The innate and perfect suitability of electric power underpins the marque's explicit commitment to deliver an all-electric Rolls-Royce this decade. In doing so, it can draw on a unique history and heritage; a connection with electric power that pre-dates the company itself, and featuring the main protagonists who would, between them, create the world's most famous automotive brand – beginning with Sir Henry Royce himself.


    SIR HENRY ROYCE

    Born in 1863, Henry Royce was one of the world's first electrical engineers. After his apprenticeship with the Great Northern Railway was cut short for family financial reasons, he worked briefly as a toolmaker at Greenwood & Batley in Leeds, where he first developed an interest in electrical power.

    In 1881, he joined the Electric Light & Power Generating Company (EL&PG) in Southwark. During this time, he attended evening classes in electrics at the City & Guilds of London Institute, having received only a year of formal schooling as a child. A year later, aged just 19, he moved to the EL&PG's new subsidiary, the Lancashire Maxim-Weston Electric Co. Ltd, as Chief Electrician, providing street and theatre lighting to the city of Liverpool. But within two years, the company folded, and the famously driven, hardworking Royce struck out on his own.

    His new enterprise, F H Royce & Co, initially made small electrical appliances such as doorbells, lamps, fuses and switches. The business thrived, and was soon producing larger, more complex devices including dynamos, electric motors and winches. In 1902, Royce supplied electric motors for Pritchett & Gold, a London-based battery-maker that had diversified into building electric cars.

    Though Royce himself never built or owned an electric motor car, he created internal combustion engines that delivered the driving experience we associate with electric propulsion today: effortless torque, silent running and the sensation of one continuous, powerful gear. His technical expertise and pioneering achievements underpin the marque's historical claim as a world leader in electrification in both luxury and social settings.


    THE HONOURABLE CHARLES ROLLS

    The Hon. Charles Rolls was also a highly gifted engineer; but his enthusiasm for electricity began even earlier in life. When he was just nine years old, he rigged up an electric bell between his bedroom and the stables at The Hendre, the family's ancestral home in Monmouthshire. He also planned and supervised the installation of electricity in the servants' quarters; deploying the powers of salesmanship that would later make him world-famous, he persuaded his father, Lord Llangattock, to pay for it.

    Rolls' passion for motor cars was equally precocious. In 1896, aged 18, he travelled to Paris and bought his first car, a 3¾ hp Peugeot Phaeton. Two years later, while still an engineering student at Cambridge, he acquired his only electric-powered car, an American-made vehicle called The Columbia Electric Carriage, imported into the UK by Paris Singer (heir to the sewing machine dynasty) and sold as the 'City & Suburban' car. Rolls regarded this as the best then available.


    In an interview published in The Motor-Car Journal in April 1900, Rolls described electric propulsion, in terms that, over a century later, carry the ring of prescient prophecy:


    The electric car is perfectly noiseless and clean. There is no smell or vibration, and they should become very useful when fixed charging stations can be arranged. But for now, I do not anticipate that they will be very serviceable – at least for many years to come.”


    Rolls made his own small contribution to solving the problem, by providing a battery-charging station at his car showroom on Lillie Road in Fulham for the private or rentable electric Broughams that were all the rage in London at the time.


    In 1904, Charles Rolls agreed to become an agent for the Contal Electromobile electric car. But on meeting Henry Royce and seeing his new motor car, he cancelled the agreement.


    As he correctly predicted, it would be a long time before electric vehicles became truly viable on any scale. But it is tempting to think that had this visionary entrepreneur survived the air crash that claimed his life at the young age of just 32, the day might have come rather sooner.


    A SERIES OF CONNECTIONS

    While Rolls and Royce are immortalised as the founders, others, perhaps less well-known, were intimately and crucially involved in the events that led to the creation of the Rolls-Royce marque. They, too, were luminaries in the worlds of motoring and electric power around the beginning of the 20th century; history and the marque are indebted to all of the following:


    HENRY EDMUNDS

    In his early career, Henry Royce worked for Brush Electrical Engineering Company Ltd, where he met Henry Edmunds, the company’s engineer. Edmunds earned his place in history when, on 4 May 1904 at the Midland Hotel in Manchester, he announced: “Mr. Royce, may I introduce you to Charles Rolls”.


    The man who would be remembered by posterity as 'The Godfather of Rolls-Royce' was a towering figure in his own right. A friend of Joseph Swan (the inventor of the incandescent lightbulb) and Thomas Edison (the inventor of almost everything else), he was a pioneer of electric lighting, traction and telephony, and was present at both the first successful sound recording and telephone call. He also brought into being the world's first electrified underground railway, when he persuaded the engineer in charge of London’s City & Southwick Railway (now the City branch of the Northern Line) to operate trains powered by electricity rather than steam.

    In 1888, Edmunds established W T Glover & Company, which became the world's leading manufacturer of electricity cabling. In 1894, he supplied lighting cables for a vast dock complex and industrial estate (the world's first) serving the Manchester Ship Canal: the lighting itself was designed and installed by Henry Royce.

    No proof exists that Edmunds played any part in the development of Royce's motor cars. He was, however, the most experienced motorist among Royce's friends and colleagues, so presumably offered expert advice and encouragement as Royce painstakingly turned his ideas into reality.

    E A CLAREMONT
    Conventional wisdom states that Royce co-founded F H Royce & Co with a partner, E A Claremont. However, research has shown that Claremont joined the company some six months after its formation; Royce himself wrote, 'I was induced to found… a small company in my own name' and none but his was ever used.

    While the original myth may be flawed, it is certainly true that the two men’s careers were closely entwined for many years. Claremont was a partner in F H Royce & Company, Joint Managing Director of F H Royce & Company Limited, Chairman of Royce Limited and the first Chairman of Rolls-Royce Limited; both were also Members of the Institute of Electrical Engineers.

    CLAUDE JOHNSON
    Broad-shouldered, extroverted and a talented salesman, Johnson was the self-styled 'Hyphen in Rolls-Royce'. In 1903, he quit his role as secretary of the Automobile Club of Great Britain & Ireland – whose members included the aforementioned Henry Edmunds – to work for Paris Singer's City & Suburban Electric Carriage company.

    After less than a year, however, Johnson left to join C S Rolls and Co, later becoming Managing Director of Rolls-Royce Ltd. He was responsible for much of the company's early publicity: in advertisements produced for the UK and US markets, he described Rolls-Royce as 'a petrol car as smooth and quiet as an electric'. And to complete the symmetry, Paris Singer became the world's first owner of a Rolls-Royce motor car.

    ELECTRIFICATION IN THE GOODWOOD ERA
    In the spirit of these founding figures, Rolls-Royce Motor Cars remains an electrification pioneer today. When the first production fully electric Rolls-Royce reaches the market, it will be the culmination of research and development work that has been in progress at the Home of Rolls-Royce at Goodwood, for well over a decade.

    2011 – PHANTOM EE (102EX)
    In 2011, the marque released Phantom Experimental Electric (EE), codenamed 102EX; a fully operational and road-legal battery-electric version of its pinnacle product.

    Phantom EE was never intended for production, serving instead as a working test-bed for clients, VIPs, the media and enthusiasts to experience electric propulsion and share their experiences, thoughts and considerations directly with Rolls-Royce designers and engineers.

    The car's 6.75-litre V12 petrol engine and gearbox were replaced with a lithium-ion battery pack and two electric motors mounted on the rear sub-frame, connected to a single-speed transmission with integrated differential. This system gave a maximum power output of 290kW and torque of 800Nm, compared to 338kW and maximum torque of 720Nm, delivered at 3,500rpm, for the V12 Phantom of the time.

    While Phantom EE drew widespread acclaim for its technical accomplishment, particularly its near-total silence and impressive torque delivery...


    GBGOBLENOTE


    ...its limited range, long charging cycles and three-year battery life remained significant hurdles that Rolls-Royce would need to address in order to satisfy the expectations of its clients.


    - End Quotes (press release 2021)


    Source

    ROLLS-ROYCE AND ELECTRIC POWER: A PROPHECY, A PROMISE AND AN UNDERTAKING
    Rolls-Royce reflects on heritage of electric power ahead of historic announcement. Electrification has long been promoted as the future of automotive…
    www.press.rolls-roycemotorcars.com


    Also

    Luxury carmaker Rolls-Royce to switch to all electric vehicles by 2030

    PUBLISHED WED, SEP 29 2021

    Luxury carmaker Rolls-Royce to switch to all electric vehicles by 2030
    Rolls-Royce will produce only electric cars by 2030, the luxury carmaker said on Wednesday.
    www.cnbc.com

  • Пора делать летающие тарелки...

    Нефть - это кровь планеты, надо сделать модель планеты и мы получим генератор Тарасенко, эта энергия покорит вселенную! :lenr:

  • Right


    Let's just pretend that only the juice from Solar Wind Hydro and Nuclear flows into the EV charging infrastructure.

    If it does not perhaps then...

    The claim "zero carbon fleet" made by Tesla and the folks at Rolls-Royce is also not actually and factually correct. Right.

    Yet

    A house solar array can charge up a Tesla Wall Pack by nightfall...

    That then charges up your car at night!

    A one car zero carbon fleet. Period


    Highy irrelevant here.

    The point I am making is...


    An on-board cold fusion trickle charger changes this scenario and gives the Rolls-Royce client the luxury and performance they have always had, and expect, from a Rolls.


    JedRothwell  PhysicsForDummies


    Does GEC have what they claim to have? 🤔


    Has Torsten Müller-Ötvös, Chief Executive Officer, of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars surfed their website and...

    Then gave them a call?


    Global Energy Corporation Launches (cold fusion) Electric Vehicle

    Quote

    (LENR) "trickle charger" gives the car a "10,000 mile range" without fueling or charging. Patented nanogenerator simply "attaches to battery pack of existing EVs... "

  • Helion seem to be doing well in boosting confidence in future fusion, I saw this article published by the Financial Times:


    Record fundraising by a nuclear fusion start-up

    A nuclear fusion start-up backed by Silicon Valley investor Sam Altman and Peter Thiel’s Mithril Capital has secured $500m to demonstrate commercially viable power by 2024 in the largest capital raise yet by a private fusion company.

    The investment in US-based Helion is the latest sign of growing private sector confidence in the potential of nuclear fusion to provide clean, cheap power that would fundamentally transform the world’s ability to cut carbon emissions.

    “On the whole, fusion has been missing from the global conversation about what we’re going to do about the climate crisis, but that is rapidly changing,” Altman, who will join Helion’s board as executive chair, told the Financial Times.

    The newly formed Fusion Industry Association said last week that at least 35 different companies were now pursuing nuclear fusion around the world and predicted that fusion energy would be connected to the grid in the 2030s.

    The prospect of fusing atoms to generate almost unlimited power from minimal fuel has tantalised scientists for decades. Soviet scientists pioneered the development of the first fusion machine, known as the “tokamak”, in the 1950s but no group has been able to achieve fusion while producing more electricity than the system consumes.

    Unlike the traditional tokamak approach, which uses energy from the fusion reaction to drive steam turbines, Helion’s system enables it to generate electricity directly from the fusion reaction as the fuel expands.

    David Kirtley, Helion’s chief executive, compared it to the regenerative breaking system in a Tesla electric car, where the kinetic energy from the vehicle is used to recharge the battery system.

    Helion engineers test equipment
    “The key there is that we can bypass all the capital cost and all the complexity of all those steam turbine systems . . . and focus on getting fusion as small and fast as possible.”

    The $500m investment, led by Altman, fully funds Helion to build by 2024 what would be the first fusion demonstration plant to generate net electricity. If successful, the investors, who also include Facebook co-founder Dustin Moskovitz and sustainability-focused Capricorn Investment Group, have committed to a further $1.7bn to fund future manufacturing.

    Rather than building a large single fusion plant, Helion wants to produce shipping container-sized 50 megawatt fusion generators that can be transported to a site and plugged in. Sufficient to power 40,000 homes, the company initially hopes to power data centres and other industrial sites.

    “With a small amount of fuel you can generate a tremendous amount of energy,” Kirtley said. The company’s approach uses the hydrogen isotope deuterium, which can be extracted from seawater. It is combined with helium and heated to more than 100m degrees Celsius, causing the atomic nuclei to fuse, releasing vast amounts of energy in the process.

    One glass of the fuel is equivalent to the energy potential of 1m gallons of oil and could generate 9m kilowatt hours of electricity, enough to power a home for 865 years, according to Helion.

    Not only would the energy be carbon-free and almost limitless, it would also be cheap. While some technical hurdles remain, Kirtley estimated that Helion’s system could produce power for less than $0.01 per kilowatt hour. That compares with average residential power costs in the US today of roughly $0.13 per KWH.

    Sceptics remain unconvinced given fusions’ many false dawns but its proponents are increasingly optimistic.

    “In addition to being our best path out of the climate crisis, less expensive energy, I think it is transformational for society,” said Altman. “If the company can accomplish that it will be one of the most important moments in the history of energy and just a massive transformation of how the world works.”

  • A nuclear fusion start-up backed by Silicon Valley investor Sam Altman and Peter Thiel’s Mithril Capital has secured $500m to demonstrate commercially viable power by 2024 in the largest capital raise yet by a private fusion company.

    Still hot fusion just cheaper containment. Please stay off 10 MeV neutrons will transmute you to an EVO...

  • Fusion tech may be geo thermal breakthrough.


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    Even 50 meters below the ground in Paris, the tunnels had to be shored up with concrete segments.("voussoirs" in french) Who can believe that a thin wall of glass could withstand the pressure of rock at 5 km depth? I'm afraid it's science fiction.

  • Europe: natural gas, nuclear are green energy in some circumstances (cnbc.com)


    The European Union voted on Wednesday to keep some specific uses of natural gas and nuclear energy in its taxonomy of sustainable sources of energy.


    The vote “reflects a growing recognition that the ongoing ‘energy transition’ is going to be far more complex and difficult to achieve than the overarching, simplistic narratives,” Blackmon told CNBC.

  • Butler County, Ohio Bans Wind and Solar Projects in a Dozen Townships | RealClearEnergy


    As I have reported many times, the raging backlash against the renewable industry doesn’t fit the convenient narrative that wind and solar are “green” and that they are “cheaper” than traditional forms of energy production. These rejections are not being covered by The New York Times or National Public Radio, but they reflect the growing outrage in rural American towns and counties over the land grab that is being attempted by some of America’s biggest companies in the name of climate change.

  • These rejections are not being covered by The New York Times or National Public Radio, but they reflect the growing outrage in rural American towns and counties over the land grab that is being attempted by some of America’s biggest companies in the name of climate change.

    To many idiots live in USA, especially in "Trump" counties that mix up the personal future with the countries future. In reality wind does virtually no land grab. Solar of course is nonsense on farm land. But there is ample space in USA where only cows live once a year...

  • To many idiots live in USA, especially in "Trump" counties that mix up the personal future with the countries future. In reality wind does virtually no land grab. Solar of course is nonsense on farm land. But there is ample space in USA where only cows live once a year...

    It is much more complex than that, but I do agree with you about wind and solar. I am a big proponent of these green technologies, but I am also practical in that I see all this NIMBY blocking the huge implementation we need, and need soon. That push-back is not going away anytime soon, so we must be reasonable and revisit other energy sources...if LENR does not come through for us.


    So you better hurry up and save the planet, or I predict nuclear is in our future.

  • What about tidal energy production. No land grab and the we already have the existing technology.

    It works, but the equipment takes a beating from wave/tidal action and salt water eats it up. Costs therefore prohibitively high. It has been tried in various forms (one right in NYC's East River), but they never work out as far as I know.