LENR vs Solar/Wind, and emerging Green Technologies.

  • Well, LENR is not that new. On the other hand, the only free energy we have comes from the sun, even skeptics believe in that.

    For what it’s worth, I don’t lump LENR in with what I referred to as free energy claims and therefore my comments were not directed towards LENR. As for what skeptics believe, unfortunately the term “skeptics” has taken on a specific and pejorative meaning in these parts. In my upbringing, a scientist of any quality at all is a skeptic who demands hard evidence for forming an opinion.

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    Been looking at Tesla Powerwall systems. Around $ 8-10k installed in the UK to store 13.5kW with a 5kW peak load.


    !0 x 12V 200AH lead-acid truck batteries will cost around $2k. Coupling up to produce 24V to feed a 10kW 240V DC-AC inverter and buying a smart (off-peak even) trickle charger for them would cost another $1.5-2k . This would give you 12x2x200Ah = 24kWh. Twice the capacity and twice the peak load for half the money.


    Batteries... https://www.alpha-batteries.co…aRoAUEcWWY0kaAiTLEALw_wcB


    Inverter... https://www.amazon.co.uk/BuoQu…ef_=ast_slp_dp&th=1&psc=1


    A Sunday idea delivered late...no good for an apartment -but good for a house.

  • Failure to produce a product is no proof the tech wasn't real. I am quite confident the Papp engine was real - looks like a hydrino reaction to me. Even the engineers who get that far, are sunk for lack of theoretical know how. Coupled with the irrational fear of someone stealing their invisible ring, we know why failure is so common, failure to build a team.


    The path of the entrepreneur requires a vast amount of skills which basically no person can have. Meaning you could have 100 PhDs who know how magnetic motors work but 99 would fail for one reason or another. I stand open to the idea, but assume at the moment that they are using some sort of stored capacity in a magnet that itself took energy to form.. I haven't found any hard science to describe it.


    Btw, if you are going down this path, feel free to reach out! I have skilled people in my network who can help.

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    We install AGM type 200 AH battery banks with the kind of integrated charger - inverters that control de level of discharge to keep the batteries from deteriorating fast, and they are so much cheaper than Li-ion batteries that there’s no contest. All this for irrigation but at least two of my projects included household power in the mix.

    Sure it helps being in one of the most sunny parts of the world, but we have a lot of cloudy days also.

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    https://www.bbc.com/news/business-57253947


    Not sure I agree with the authors belief that: " By my reckoning, the EV market is about where the internet was around the late 1990s or early 2000s", but I like his enthusiasm. That said, it does appear EV's will be the future, but debatable how far in the future.

    It can be really sped up by regulations so I take it as a given.

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    Halliburton Labs- White paper on the problems of scaling up.


    The energy transition, or the transformation of the global energy sector from fossil-based to zero-carbon sources , has emerged as a key challenge ofour time. It is a term increasingly used by experts

    and laypeople alike, yet few have a real notion of the enormity of the concept. Most people are

    likely aware that a move towards renewable energy systems can help avoid the threat of global warming and support a more sustainable future. However, there is little appreciation of the difficulty and

    complexity of achieving this switch.


    The magnitude of the change is such that it is still uncertain whether current technologies will be sufficient for the job. Until the pathway is clear, we cannot afford to switch off fossil fuel pow-er systems, which form the bedrock of modern society. Equally, there is no time to lose in seek-ing solutions to the energy transition conundrum. Even if global warming were not an issue, the fact remains that most
    fossil fuel reserves are expected to have run out by the end of the century. We must find alternatives and bring them up toscale—fast..


    Energy_Transition_Whitepaper.pdf

  • Beyond the need to find alternatives or risk survival/discomfort is the promise of "better".


    Better can mean cleaner, smaller, lighter, longer-lived, denser, simpler, easier, or more adaptable.


    I believe a major challenge is making new things which are so much better that the old things cannot compete.


    Resting on your laurels, when better can be found, seems a bit silly, especially if you thrive on challenges.


    Let us hope that human nature's desire for challenge continues and strengthens.

  • One thing I would like to mention. Taking out wind energy is physically also lowering the global temperature. Will be interesting if we see such effects. "Stopping" air circulation results in hotter region staying warmer an vice versa. So there will be also an effect on backward radiation.

  • One thing I would like to mention. Taking out wind energy is physically also lowering the global temperature. Will be interesting if we see such effects. "Stopping" air circulation results in hotter region staying warmer an vice versa. So there will be also an effect on backward radiation.

    Not only this, the heat pump, the golf stream, that gives so much life to Europe is claimed to be weaken and if that happen then things can really get nasty. Unbearable heat near the equator probably and something much cooler where I live.

  • Not only this, the heat pump, the golf stream, that gives so much life to Europe is claimed to be weaken

    The gulf stream has an about 40 years oscillation. Now we face the minimum with the same wet weather we had about 40 years ago. Last time there have been 3 wet years in 4.

    The gulf stream circulation and oscillation is claimed to depend on the melting polar ice that produces two effects. Water is cooling down --> heavier --> sinking. But the density has minimum around 4Co. The other effect is: Sweat water is less heavy --> opposite effect - deep water (at 4Co) coming upwards.

    The current model is unclear ...

  • Until the pathway is clear, we cannot afford to switch off fossil fuel pow-er systems, which form the bedrock of modern society.

    I think there is some truth to this. But people sometimes forget that we replace almost all energy generation systems every 20 to 50 years anyway, as equipment wears out. Hydroelectric dams last longer, and the buildings that house steam turbines can last longer, but the equipment itself wears out. Automobile, truck, locomotive and aircraft engines wear out. So, replacing all of it in two generations may not be as difficult as it seems. It will not cost more than we have to pay anyway. Many analyses now say that solar and wind are cheaper per kilowatt of capacity than coal or natural gas. They are far cheaper than nuclear power. Assuming that is the case, replacing most generator capacity with solar and wind will not cost more than we would have pay to maintain our present generating systems. Okay, maybe a little more, because we will need batteries or other storage systems.


    Certainly there would be no problem scaling up the manufacturing of wind and solar. There is enough capacity in the U.S. and the North Sea, or the Sahara desert, to power the whole world many times over. The problem would be to get the energy from the U.S. southwest or the Sahara to places like Japan that do not have abundant wind or solar resources. Perhaps hydrogen or synthetic hydrocarbons would be economical.


    Along the same lines, people sometimes say: "we cannot afford to replace all automobiles with electric cars." Or ". . . with self-driving cars." They forget that most automobiles only last about 11 years. We have to replace them all anyway. Even experts sometimes overlook this. I have read comments from them like this.


    Of course, a few automobiles last longer than 11 years. I had one for 20 years before it finally gave up the ghost. There are even a few Model-T Ford buzzing around. The National Geographic says: "Approximately 65 percent of all Rolls-Royce motorcars ever built are still on the road today." (https://www.natgeotv.com/ca/megafactories/rolls-royce). But those are special cases. Nearly all of the cars on the road today were made in the last 11 years. Furthermore, if we were stop the production of gasoline engine cars today, and make only electric models, in about 5 years most gas stations would go out of business, and people owning gasoline models would be forced to trade in, which would accelerate the transition. See p. 2 and 3:


    https://www.lenr-canr.org/acrobat/RothwellJthefuturem.pdf

  • The other thing to remember is you do not need to replace every single fossil fuel engine to avert calamity. If, the year 2100, there are still a few hundred coal-fired generators and a few hundred thousand gasoline powered automobiles, that should not be a problem. As long as we grow more trees to remove carbon faster than these would add them, it should be okay. There are plenty of places that would benefit from reforestation. If indoor agriculture increases -- as I hope it will -- there were be millions of acres of land available for reforestation. Indoor agriculture uses much less land, water, pesticide and energy than conventional farms.


    On the other hand, it would be better for people living near coal fired plants and coal mines if we shut them all down.

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    And, as not many people know, wind-powered cars can go downwind faster than the wind. Which sounds ridiculous but has been proven true. In the same way, hydrofoil yachts achieve speeds far in excess of the wind speed.

    And now has been proven to the level of having got a Physicist have to pay an USD 10.000 bet!


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    These millennials sure know how to have fun!


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