LENR vs Solar/Wind, and emerging Green Technologies.

  • Another obscure promise from h2 upstart 'from 2 liters of water 1MW of energy per week'

    Project
    PROJECT https://ebh2systems.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Videocortev9.mp4 Copyright © 2021 EBH2 Systems | Powered by @ferandresok
    ebh2systems.com

  • Lightbridge is based in Reston, Virginia and it is an early-stage advanced nuclear fuel technology company. This fits the “outskirts of Virginia” description.

    It formerly had a joint venture partnership with Framatome, which was mutually dissolved this past March.

    Lightbridge recently signed an R&D agreement with the US Department of Energy’s GAIN program.

    Its a cheaper kind of nuclear fuel rod for power plants- you cant use it at hom

  • Scientists are excited about an experimental nuclear reactor using thorium as fuel, which is about to begin tests in China. Although this radioactive element has been trialled in reactors before, experts say that China is the first to have a shot at commercializing the technology.


    The reactor is unusual in that it has molten salts circulating inside it instead of water. It has the potential to produce nuclear energy that is relatively safe and cheap, while also generating a much smaller amount of very long-lived radioactive waste than conventional reactors.


    Construction of the experimental thorium reactor in Wuwei, on the outskirts of the Gobi Desert, was due to be completed by the end of August — with trial runs scheduled for this month, according to the government of Gansu province.


    Thorium is a weakly radioactive, silvery metal found naturally in rocks and currently has little industrial use. It is a waste product of the growing rare-earth mining industry in China, and is therefore an attractive alternative to importing uranium, say researchers.



    China prepares to test thorium-fuelled nuclear reactor
    If China’s experimental reactor is a success it could lead to commercialization and help the nation meet its climate goals.
    www.nature.com

  • Thanks Alan Smith , We have commented here already that LTFRs have become all the rage lately as if they were something revolutionary and new, while I can only wonder why a technology more than 60 years old validated to MW pilot plant level is becoming news now.

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • Thanks JedRothwell , I think that there’s been well organized and documented activism for LTFRs at least since 2011, that I am aware of, and it was often brushed away being called “conspiracy theorists” when they pointed out that the main and perhaps only reason that LTFRs did not become the main conventional fission power technology was that the military industrial complex did not want it as they wouldn’t get the plutonium for the nukes.


    Now this is being openly admitted and regarded as something reasonable to have been done, almost as if normal, and just called “a political decision”. I can’t really wrap my head around this outrageous change of narrative.

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • the main and perhaps only reason that LTFRs did not become the main conventional fission power technology was that the military industrial complex did not want it as they wouldn’t get the plutonium for the nukes.

    That does not make sense to me. They make plenty of plutonium before there were any power reactors. At the end of WWII they were making a Pu bomb every three weeks. The military has unlimited funding. If they could not get Pu from power reactors, I am sure they would make more of their own reactors. Plus they have Navy reactors.


    They do not actually need that much Pu. There are not that many bombs. At the peak inventory in 1965 there were 31,000 bombs in the U.S. There were only 17 nuclear power reactors in the whole world in 1960. Yet the military had enough Pu for 31,000 bombs.


    Status of World Nuclear Forces
    The number of nuclear weapons in the world has declined significantly since the Cold War: down from a peak of approximately 70,300 in 1986 to an estimated…
    fas.org


    https://www.iaea.org/sites/default/files/publications/magazines/bulletin/bull29-3/29304781925.pdf

  • JedRothwell , this article


    The Other Clean Nuclear Energy
    And the dirty secret to why it isn’t used
    medium.com


    And this video:

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    Had both been posted already in this thread about LTFRs and both mention the issue of plutonium, is not something I am saying.

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • Wow!

    I was aware of this paper, I contacted Luciano after the ICCF 23 due to him being the only South American presenter there.


    I am glad because he is relatively young and enthusiastic and wants to devote full time to LENR, and he comes fully from the classic Nuclear research, so it’s really encouraging that he is so interested in the field.


    The sad part is that this journal where he published is in the so called Beall’s list, which is the best way to get your paper ignored by mainstream. I know is hard to find outlets for work on LENR, but I think publishing on any journal listed in Beall’s list is a wasted effort, no matter how good the paper is, it will be tossed away as nonsense.

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • Bad planning?

    Bad intentions? (Knowing about issues but proceeding anyway to get the money?)

    Plain stupidity?

    It sounds to me like unanticipated problems, and an overreaction.


    It could be they don't need the power at night. Many wind farms are feathered in the dead of night for lack of demand.


    It says they will resume full production after the migratory season.


    If they are running coal fired plants at night to replace the lost power, they are killing more bats and birds with coal smoke than the turbines kill. That would be stupid. They do use a lot of coal in Missouri.


    Missouri - State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

  • Here is a gigantic grandfather clock gadget for storing energy. It lasts only 35 years. I am not impressed.

    Was once a small Swiss invention - last year - now already global and rootless...


    It looks not very nice but there are more crude versions built with railway truck running up/down hill. I would not place it in tornado land.