LENR vs Solar/Wind, and emerging Green Technologies.

  • Toyota is also investing in a hydrogen combustion engine which will be able to fit with some of its long standing ICE component suppliers.

    Someone at Toyota is in love with this technology, but everyone else in the world knows it is a dead duck. They are selling only a handful each year, and the numbers are going down. They sold 2,094 in the U.S. in 2022. There is no chance this technology will survive. Even hybrids and plug in hybrids are obsolescent and will not be around for long. The market for any large scale technology can only support two standards. Electric cars and gasoline cars make it impossible for a third standard. Keeping inventory and training mechanics is too much of a burden on the manufacturers and distributers.


    It would cost billions of dollars to keep this on life support. Toyota is not going to spend that kind of money to keep long standing ICE suppliers alive. They might as well just hand them each $200 million.


    Japanese institutions have a bad habit of keeping dead technology on life support, but they can only go so far. They had a nuclear powered ship, the Mutsu, tied up to a dock for decades until 1995. They finally removed the reactor, decontaminated it, and renamed it Mirai as oceanographic explorer. I am sure it would have been far cheaper to build a new ship from scratch, but they did not want to admit it was a waste. ("Mirai" means "future" but in the case of the car and the ship it should be "the dead past.") Then there was the Monju breeder reactor. One of the most expensive technical fiascos in history.

  • Absolutely correct. Only Hydrogen and batteries will survive. In the EU you can no longer sell gasoline cars after 2030!!

    They may stop selling them in 2030, but people will not stop using them. There are millions on the road. The average automobile lasts 11 years. So there will still be many in 2040, and they will need parts, service, mechanics and so on, in competition with hydrogen fuel cell cars.


    Furthermore, hydrogen cars have many disadvantages. They cost far more than electric cars, and they are not falling in price, whereas electric cars will soon be cheaper than gasoline models. Hydrogen cars require a new hydrogen distribution grid and fueling stations. Most electric cars can be charged at home. Once electric car range reaches 500 to 600 miles -- the most you can drive in one day -- the only major advantage of hydrogen cars will disappear.

  • Furthermore, hydrogen cars have many disadvantages. They cost far more than electric cars, and they are not falling in price, whereas electric cars will soon be cheaper than gasoline models. Hydrogen cars require a new hydrogen distribution grid and fueling stations. Most electric cars can be charged at home. Once electric car range reaches 500 to 600 miles -- the most you can drive in one day -- the only major advantage of hydrogen cars will disappear.

    You are probably right. Main problem facing the UK is that we don't have the infrastructure to support an all-electric fleet, and not much is being done about that. For example, I live on a group of around 100 houses mostly built between 1911 and 1934. The main and grid-tap was upgraded in 1963 and most houses have a 40kW supply. The locale being mostly one where people own at least 2 cars per household, sometimes 4 or 5. If everybody put in a couple of 12.5KW charging points that would mean additional potential demand of 2.5MW, even if it was just 1MW additional peak demand that and the proposed phasing out of gas heating would require a major overhaul of the local grid. The industrial estate where my lab is has the same problem because of increased occupancy and the owner is looking at around $250k to upgrade the grid transformer and the 600 meters of cabling between grid-tap and the users. It's all too old and overburdened as it is, but nobody in power (no pun intended) mentions it.

  • f everybody put in a couple of 12.5KW charging points that would mean additional potential demand of 2.5MW, even if it was just 1MW additional peak demand

    In Atlanta they dealt with this with smart meters. They charge much less at night. They have a special electric car rate at night. So there is very little extra demand during peak hours, which are in the afternoon. Also, you are not allowed to install a "Level 2" (7 kW) car charger unless your house wiring is less than 50 years old. (I think it was 50 years . . .)


    You can always trickle charge with an ordinary 110 VAC plug. (110 in the U.S.) I guess if you plugged in every night that would keep the car charged.


    My daughter lives in downtown Washington DC. She has the landlord install a 220 VAC connector in her living room, next to the window. The kind use for clothes dryers. She runs a wire out the window, across the sidewalk to the car parked in front of the house. They have permit-only parking, so she can usually park in front of her own house. The wire costs ~$100. She has to cover it on the sidewalk with a bright plastic cover used by construction companies and restaurants to power things across sidewalks downtown.

  • Also, you are not allowed to install a "Level 2" (7 kW) car charger unless your house wiring is less than 50 years old. (I think it was 50 years . . .)


    You can always trickle charge with an ordinary 110 VAC plug. (110 in the U.S.) I guess if you plugged in every night that would keep the car charged.

    There's another problem I suspect most houses (and many apartments) in Europe/UK are more than 50 years old. Also, quite a few of the bigger electric cars (Jaguar E-Pace, etc) will not trickle charge, or charge at all on less than 7.5kW . It's a real problem jed- not now, but in the next 5 years. Aggravated by the fact that due to the drive to do away with gas heating more people will want to use night-time cheap electricity to power storage heaters. There really isn't enough juice to supply everything.

  • Gravity batteries in abandoned mines could power the whole planet, scientists say

    A method to store excess renewable energy, reuse decommissioned mines, and provide jobs

    Gravity batteries in abandoned mines could power the whole planet, scientists say
    A study from the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) proposes that decommissioned mines could be repurposed to operate gravity…
    www.techspot.com


    Why it matters: Gravity batteries are a potential candidate for storing excess renewable energy, but finding places to install them is a challenge. Researchers have proposed that abandoned mines across the globe could be a cost-effective solution that may also provide jobs.


    A study from the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) proposes that decommissioned mines could be repurposed to operate gravity batteries. Converting old mines could provide enough energy to match the entire planet's current daily electricity consumption.


    Climate change: 'Sand battery' could solve green energy's big problem

    Climate change: 'Sand battery' could solve green energy's big problem
    A storage device made from sand may overcome the biggest issue in the transition to renewable energy.
    www.bbc.com

  • We need energy that can be taken into space to work in space. It takes very little, I need capacitors and a good rectifier with direct current, the main thing is that no one wants to help, I wrote to everyone about it, but everyone is silent. It's very bad when everyone is silent, I understand that the war is in Ukraine, we are fighting the Communist fascists, but I liked the speech of the EU about new energy and we are gaining weight on the new energy LENP is called, in Russian. And we will defeat the whole world, that's for sure, and the Internet will help us.


    Нам нужна энергия, которую можно взять в космос, что бы она работала в космосе. Для этого нужно совсем мало, мне нужны конденсаторы и хороший выпрямитель с постоянным током, главное ни кто не хочет помочь, я всем писал об этом, но все молчат. Это очень плохо, когда все молчат, я понимаю, что война на Украине, боремся с коммунистами-фашистами, но мне понравилась выступление Евросоюзников про новую энергию и мы набираем вес по новой энергии LENP называется, ХЯС по русски. И мы победим весь мир, это точно и инет нам поможет.

    Нефть - это кровь планеты, надо сделать модель планеты и мы получим генератор Тарасенко, эта энергия покорит вселенную! :lenr:

  • +86 138 2396 1521

    Hi Gennady, the freight cost of 4pcs 6000vdc 1000uF capacitor to the logistic warehouse near your address in Kazakhstan by road transportation is USD1580.00

    Total amount is USD1116.00x4+USD1580.00=USD6044.00

    Нефть - это кровь планеты, надо сделать модель планеты и мы получим генератор Тарасенко, эта энергия покорит вселенную! :lenr:

  • Fm1

    They can't use the mines for gravity batteries because they are not allowed to disturb the bats. Sorry.

  • I got my small electric car now, takes me about 200km on a full charge in normal winter conditions (around 0) with no pre heating. And I use the old diesel car for

    trips where this form factor is less optimal. I love it, just love it. I'm reducing fuel costs from 300 dollars to 50 dollar a month. And the experience driving the

    new electric car is fantastic. I went for a more cheaper variant with smaller battery and smaller car, essentially a two person car (the dog fits behind)

    which is fine in my use case. I mostly drive the diesel car a bit ones a weak to keep it working. I expect that this is one of the most environmentally

    friendly options you have as a small car is more environmental than a big one. The regen braking is the best feature as it gives a new interesting way to drive

    the car and I find the trip is so much smoother, yep I like the smooth drive. It got 175hp and going around slow vehicles are not a problem but very smooth. I'm

    also amazed that it feels like I'm driving a big car. That car cost me about 35 000 dollars. I've also spent 2000 dollars on home charging stations so I can charge 22kW

    at home. If we need to be more people in the car, more carriage or that temperature is cold, longer trips or simple needing to tow something bigger the old diesel will still

    be there. ALso it's good to have an extra car when the kids starts to be able to drive. But boy, those electric cars today are so enjoyable to drive. My old car have

    costed me somwhere between 6000-8000 dollars a year the last 5 years. This figure is now going down significantly.

  • stefan


    What is the warranty on the battery? I figure I'll have to get an electric down the road and it seems batteries are expensive and fail too soon.

    What scale is your 0 degrees? Mine is fahrenheit.

    Celcius, You pay for extra horsepower and that the car is expensive, a larger battery means higher cost of replacing all figures I'm in the lower end. So I pay about 900 dollars a year which is not something strange in Sweden. From asking around I expect the interval 800-1200 dollars a year for this car.

  • he collapse of battery startup Britishvolt will halve the UK’s future battery production capacity, dealing a blow to the country’s hopes to build a homegrown industry to supply its carmakers.

    The UK-based company had planned to build a battery factory in the North East of England with a total capacity of 38 gigawatt-hours a year. The entirety of the UK’s cell capacity pipeline is now set to come from China’s Envision, which plans to build a 35 GWh plant in Sunderland.

    The UK was already set to be a bit-player in Europe, but without Britishvolt the country is now forecast to account for just 2.3% of Europe’s 2031 battery production capacity.

    “Britishvolt’s demise only now leaves China-based Envision as the saviour of the UK’s ambition to be a leader in electric vehicles,” Simon Moores, Benchmark’s chief executive, said. “The UK is in desperate need of more.”

    UK’s diminishing battery scene Prior to the collapse of Britishvolt, the UK accounted for 0.6% of the global battery pipeline capacity set to come into production by 2031. It is now even lower at around 0.3%.

  • Ammonia transport networks already exist and ammonia can be used as a hydrogen carrier and converted to hydrogen on-board or possibly used as a direct input to fuel cells (or diesels). It's clunky, but not as clunky as having every car carry around a ton of batteries to provide salable range figures. We are never going to live in a world where everyone runs extension cords to their cars parked on the street, even in permit only areas.


    Electroreduction of nitrogen with almost 100% current-to-ammonia efficiency - Nature
    A high-efficiency, robust process using a high-concentration imide-based lithium-salt electrolyte enables the electroreduction of nitrogen with stabilized…
    www.nature.com


    An Efficient Direct Ammonia Fuel Cell for Affordable Carbon-Neutral Transportation
    Alternative carbon-neutral synthetic fuels are needed to decarbonize the transportation sector, bridging the gap between batteries and biofuels. Herei…
    www.sciencedirect.com

  • Gravity batteries needing the right location (mines etc)?

    Here is an amusing take on this idea:


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    Another thing:


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