LENR vs Solar/Wind, and emerging Green Technologies.

  • Holcomb energy device.

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  • Holcomb energy device.

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    There are links to the various legal documents in the youtube comments.


    Patent Final Rejection (December 2023)


    Defendant's motion to dismiss legal case denied (January 2024)

    "The most misleading assumptions are the ones you don't even know you're making" - Douglas Adams

    Edited once, last by Frogfall ().

  • This is a no go answer: The question is total energy in - total energy out!


    Not really. This is a rehash of the Biefield-Brown work on thrust in vacuum from asymmetric capacitors at high voltage, which has a history almost as unhappy as that of LENR. They claim to have made it work and at a higher power. And once a cap is charged it uses little energy. The slow decay of the effect suggests that leakage currents are minimal. The Shawyer and McCulloch systems however do consume power constantly, but perhaps -in the Shawyer system and least- these are photon rockets - a different kind of beast altogether.

  • [ copied from an other forum ... classed as "code"

  • The Drax power station is still at it.

    I had several extended conversations on this very location and topic with people close to this project, At the time they were thinking about buying Miscanthus from Australia to co-feed along with coal into the fluidised-bed boilers. The more we talked the madder it got, until I walked away and left them to it.

  • Drax also encouraged quite a number of UK farmers to plant miscanthus - and then cancelled the contract. The same farmers now sell their crop to miscanthus processor Terravesta (who I believe were also stung by Drax).


    Terravesta Drax miscanthus contract changes | Terravesta
    From 2017, Drax, the UK's largest power station, will discontinue the 'Green Shoots' programme of direct farmer contracts to supply miscanthus and straw to the…
    www.terravesta.com

    "The most misleading assumptions are the ones you don't even know you're making" - Douglas Adams

  • Drax also encouraged quite a number of UK farmers to plant miscanthus - and then cancelled the contract. The same farmers now sell their crop to miscanthus processor Terravesta (who I believe were also stung by Drax).


    https://www.terravesta.com/blo…canthus-contract-changes/

    This goes a long way to show how well meant but poorly thought incentives can backfire. Sad truth.

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • By Seaver Wang and Juzel Lloyd

    What Do Fast Chinese-Led Builds Mean for Nuclear’s Future?

    Nearly every finished Chinese nuclear project starting construction since 2015 — and the vast majority of projects commencing in 2010 or later — has entered service within 7 years. This real-world trend flies in the face of the tiresome and longstanding claims that nuclear energy technologies inherently exhibit a negative learning curve, and that nuclear reactors require a decade or more to build.
    Historic analysis shows that nuclear energy can achieve positive learning curves and fast reactor builds, but commentary on the present and future of nuclear energy technology is at any rate incomplete unless one thinks globally. In fact, China, India, South Korea, or Pakistan are proving more favorable for nuclear project construction than the West. A more comprehensive perspective indeed suggests that worldwide, even as the trajectory of renewables and storage rockets upwards, the role of clean nuclear power in supporting decarbonization will in all likelihood continue to grow as well.
    Success elsewhere also illustrates that hurdles faced by recent nuclear projects in the United States, France, or Finland do not originate from some inherent quality of nuclear power, but rather logically reflect a combination of regulatory, market, political, and societal factors.
    With nuclear power clearly flourishing in China, it is time for energy commentators to unequivocally acknowledge that nuclear energy can succeed under different circumstances. That recognition in turn ought to motivate clean energy advocates to contemplate what we can do to create different, better conditions for nuclear technologies closer to home.
  • Australian solar technology

    CSIRO has successfully launched its printed flexible solar cell technology into space aboard Australia’s largest private satellite, Optimus-1.

    CSIRO is exploring the potential of printed flexible solar cells as a reliable energy source for future space endeavours, in collaboration with Australian space transportation provider, Space Machines Company.

    CSIRO Space Program Director, Kimberley Clayfield, said a major challenge in the development of spacecraft is low-mass, high-efficiency power systems.

    “CSIRO’s printed flexible solar cells could provide a reliable, lightweight energy solution for future space operations and exploration,” Ms Clayfield said.

    See full article here : https://www.energymagazine.com…ll-technology-into-space/

  • CSIRO claims new record for energy efficiency in lightweight printed solar cells
    Lead researcher says use of machine learning meant over 10,000 cells could be produced and tested in a day
    www.theguardian.com


    and: - https://nature.us17.list-manag…d=cdeb8f1916&e=2a67e2dc07


    Flexible, thin solar cells that are lightweight and portable may be a step closer to reality after Australian researchers claimed a new record for the amount of sunlight they can capture and turn into energy.

    While traditional solar panels are rigid and heavy, the lightweight solar cells are made by printing ink on to thin plastic films.

    “It’s the best demonstration that this is a viable method of making the solar cells,” said CSIRO’s renewable energy systems group leader, Dr Anthony Chesman.

    The scientists, working in collaboration with researchers from four universities, claimed an efficiency record for fully roll-to-roll printed cells, in which all of the layers of the product were made using printing methods.

    For a small-scale device they achieved efficiency of 15.5% and for a larger device measuring 50cm sq they achieved efficiency of 11%.

    The results of the research have been published in the journal Nature Communications. Lead author and CSIRO’s principal research scientist, Dr Doojin Vak, said the efficiencies were made possible by integrating machine learning into the production process.

  • Flexible, thin solar cells that are lightweight and portable may be a step closer to reality after Australian researchers claimed a new record for the amount of sunlight they can capture and turn into energy.

    The records is just based on statistical /random cell testing. The average gain is <11% or just a bit higher then the last record holder. Such cell can only be used in friendly environments like deserts with no sand storms...Or as a foil for temporary panels. The main cost of real panels is the protection glass you need and the electronics that does not change. Nothing is said about the aging tat will be at best 8 years where today Meyer Burger gives you a 30 year warranty of >90% conversion efficiency that is about 22%.

    So this product could fill some niches where classic panels simply are to expensive/heavy etc.. But you will need double the area!

  • Here are three graphs from the Energy Information Agency (eia.gov) showing planned U.S. utility scale electric power generating capacity for 2022, 2023 and 2024. As you see, power companies are adding more capacity each year, from 46 up to 63 GW. Although it has not increased that much when you subtract battery storage. Most of the new capacity is solar. Natural gas additions are way down, from 9.6 GW down to 2.5 GW.






    (2024 data https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=61424)


    Power companies are adding solar power because it is cheapest. Not only is it cheaper per watt of generating capacity, it is far cheaper to operate than natural gas because you do not have to pay for the fuel. See:


    2023 Levelized Cost Of Energy+
    Lazard's latest LCOE shows the continued cost-competitiveness of certain renewable energy technologies, and the marginal cost of coal, nuclear, and…
    www.lazard.com



    An additional clarification:


    The 2.2 GW of nuclear power shown in 2022 and 2023 are the same two reactors under construction in Georgia. They were supposed to come on line in 2022. One came in 2023, and the other we hope will turn on in 2024. These graphs were published at the beginning of the year. In the case of the nukes, it was a projected increase which did not pan out. I do not know how much of the solar, wind, battery and other projected increases materialized. Probably most of the planned capacity was actually added. I think power companies are good at installing new capacity on time. Except for nukes.


    All of the information at the EIA comes from power companies. The sources are shown in the web pages.


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