Simon Brink "Subtle Atomics" Discussion Thread

  • I have a hard time believing that people still believe Kervran. He saw transmutation as explaining almost anything not immediately obviously otherwise. Despite the anecdotes with chickens and sea shells, none of his simple experiments give transmutation results when replicated. Kevran himself turned away from transmutation ideas to new super-chemical sub-nuclear binding theories that, while ingenious, also don’t pan out when tested.

  • I have a hard time believing that people still believe Kervran. He saw transmutation as explaining almost anything not immediately obviously otherwise. Despite the anecdotes with chickens and sea shells, none of his simple experiments give transmutation results when replicated. Kevran himself turned away from transmutation ideas to new super-chemical sub-nuclear binding theories that, while ingenious, also don’t pan out when tested.


    Kervran may be right or wrong. The bigger leap is to look at expanding earth theory, particularly its implications for physics and LENR. New theory proposes that large massive objects essentially grow from background energy. Growth phenomena is well established for stars, but is not yet accepted for planets. Mills theory also has an energy to mass conversion, but this is seen to be a uniform process in contrast the Sublte Atomics model which proposes that conversion is concentrated within massive objects due to shielding type effects.


    Once you take the expanding earth leap, you start to see that almost all mass on earth is essentially a product of a low energy to mass growth processes, so LENR really starts to look a lot more like common sense rather than something exotic.


    For more info, refer to subtleatomics.com/expanding-earth-theory

  • I really like the name 'subtle atomics' because most of recent particle physics research appears to be anything but subtle-based on smashing particles together at every increasing energies. In one of our threads we've been discussing what the last 30 yrs of Lenr research has given us-well the last 30-yrs of particle physics has not been all that revealing either in increasing our knowledge base. Its the anomalies in physics which lead to advances and LENR may be regarded as just one anomaly amongst many others. Its exciting times with new discoveries on the horizon (starting a Happy New Year to everyone on a positive note).

  • Not quite

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  • Sorry you're having issues Alan.

    Website doesn't have the full security key (doesn't actually less secure, just that I haven't paid the extra $$$'s to get the key), so if your google browser is on the highest security settings, it may block the site.

    More likely sometimes after a website error you need to clear your browser data because your browser remembers the error page rather than looking for the current page.

    Alternatively to avoid this issue use: subtleatomics.com/index This seems to go around the problem. (Don't ask me why this works???)

  • If anyone is in communication with Simon Brink, please ask him to participate in this thread.


    I have a load of questions I'd like to ask.


    In response:


    1) Is platinum a catalyst according to his theory and where should it be on his chart? Yes, it does appear as an excellent catalyst (~0.14% match) for an n=1 to n=1/14 (sub-primary) transition. Note that the proposed size of n=1/14 would be around 6fm.


    2) What does he think is the lifetime of the different states of shrunken hydrogen before they go back to the ground state? If you go by the spacetime to mass conversion rate, it could take a very long time, but more likely shrunken H can absorb other locally available energy. As such return to ground state may be very dependent on local conditions (i.e. temperature, ppm, density, EM radiation, etc.).


    3) What does he think is required to make a "small hydrogen" atom undergo a nuclear reaction with another atom? For example, is there a special type of stimulation required that is different than what is required to produce the "small hydrogen" atom? Depends on which small hydrogen you have.


    4) Does he agree with Mills that an arc discharge accelerates the reaction rate due to the elimination of the space charge problem? Not sure what the Mills explanation is. My view is that it's more about creating flow conditions that produce a high pressure stationary electron zone which can cause electron shrinkage in the presence of a suitable catalyst.


    5) Does he think shrunken electrons could be repeatedly pumped to extract energy from the aether? The atomic reserve cycle. Why not!!! The problem is that you are going to end up with all these annoying LENR reactions!!!


    6) During any of his experiments, has he observed "strange radiation" track marks? Photographic reaction morphologies are highly variable and very interesting, particularly around secondary and tertiary reactions, and also halo effects around certain reactions. Secondary reactions are indicative of particles rather than strange radiation. Halos and shock waves may be more relevant to "strange radiation", but data is inadequate to come to any conclusions. There are quite a few photos on the website to explore.


    7) What is his plans to take his research to the next level? Research will mostly like continue on an as-time-permits basis, generally in the public domain, until such time as there is interest from a serious investor in IP ownership and a rapid progression towards commercial products and services.

  • My view is that it's more about creating flow conditions that produce a high pressure stationary electron zone which can cause electron shrinkage in the presence of a suitable catalyst.


    Interesting view. In the excerpt from your ICCF-21 presentation I transcribed a while back in this thread you mentioned that a sort of electrical "water hammer" effect could be involved in the electron shrinkage.


    Incidentally, the electrical equivalent of a water hammer is often considered to be a circuit with inductance. There, if current flow is suddenly changed, a counter EMF is produced. The larger the current and the more abrupt the change (and the higher the inductance), the more intense the "hammer effect", akin to what happens when trying to suddenly stop a large volume of high flowing water.


    Perhaps one could see similar results to using a large capacitor bank by abruptly interrupting a large current flow from a suitable coil or transformer?

  • I wish you lots of luck with your shop venture. I hope you aren't expecting too much customer feedback though- I gave up with the Looking For Heat shop not because of low sales, they were fine, but because it was really designed to help create a crowd of experimenters with similar equipment to screen materials and other things. That part of it failed to work, so as I am more suited to experimentation than I am to shop-keeping I gave it up

  • I wish you lots of luck with your shop venture. I hope you aren't expecting too much customer feedback though- I gave up with the Looking For Heat shop not because of low sales, they were fine, but because it was really designed to help create a crowd of experimenters with similar equipment to screen materials and other things. That part of it failed to work, so as I am more suited to experimentation than I am to shop-keeping I gave it up

  • I wish you lots of luck with your shop venture. I hope you aren't expecting too much customer feedback though- I gave up with the Looking For Heat shop not because of low sales, they were fine, but because it was really designed to help create a crowd of experimenters with similar equipment to screen materials and other things. That part of it failed to work, so as I am more suited to experimentation than I am to shop-keeping I gave it up


    Thanks Alan. My principle motivation has always been around facilitating the development of replacement energy systems for carbon based fuels, but there are some really interesting side developments coming out of new developments that may offer a far quicker path to the industrialisation of beneficial LENR. The LENR shop showcases some of the progress being made, and will hopefully be a stepping stone towards larger production capacity and an increased capacity to develop low carbon energy systems.

  • Simon Brink

    This might sound like a silly question, but can dense hydrogen production and absorption into the metal be large enough that the density of the samples gets macroscopically affected? That would be an interesting practical demonstration of the effect, if possible.

  • there are some really interesting side developments coming out of new developments that may offer a far quicker path to the industrialisation of beneficial LENR. The LENR shop is showcases some of the progress being made, and will hopefully be a stepping stone towards larger production capacity.


    Interesting comment, that will no doubt leave some curious to learn more. Could you be a little more specific as to what you mean by "beneficial LENR", and what it is in your new Shop that showcases progress?

  • Yes definitely, noting that you can also load other materials apart from metals.


    That's very interesting, although I must point out that I did really mean macroscopically, a possible example being foils or other small samples (not necessarily metallic as you mention) treated so that they are denser than osmium or iridium (the densest elements known).


    Beyond scientific research there could already be a market for cost-competitive superheavy materials, although I understand the limiting factor here would be the rate of production of such hydrogen form.