Simon Brink "Subtle Atomics" Discussion Thread

  • When any hydride including pure deuterium and protium or any metal is compressed by pressures in the order of millions of atmospheres within the depths of most celestial bodies, these materials will initiate and support the LENR reaction. This natural reaction will extract heat from the vacuum.


    This quantum mechanical reaction will produce superconductivity and super-fluidity up to a temperature of 90,000 F. This is why Rossi can support a LENR reaction based on ultra dense hydrogen in his ballerina plasma.


    Sometimes, research in main stream science can inform how LENR works.


    https://phys.org/news/2019-03-liquid-metal-plasma.html


    also see


    Breakdown of Fermi degeneracy in the simplest liquid metal

    https://www.researchgate.net/p…the_simplest_liquid_metal


    This research into ultra-dense deuterium is revealing in the way the LENR active agent behaves when used at extreme temperatures and pressures in a plasma.


    Compressed hydrogen enters a metalized quantum mechanical state that is preserved through extremely high temperatures and pressures. This behavior most likely includes superconductivity even at extreme temperatures.


    In detail, during the compression produced through the use of an optical shockwave, the deuterium's optical properties is maintained up to a minimum temperature of 90,000 degrees Fahrenheit whereupon as temperatures increase beyond this point, its quantum nature begins to deteriorate.


    The reflectivity of the hydrogen quantum fluid is the mechanism used by this experiment whereby the polaritons can form the LENR active plasmoid structure in the electron quantum layer covering the positive core of the ultra dense material. The polaritons form within the optical mirror that the coherent quantum nature of the deuterium generates.


    Above 90,000 degrees Fahrenheit, this LENR active behavior begins to deteriorate. The polariton cover begins to weaken.


    One important implication of this behavior is that any metal that is highly compressed will support the LENR reaction. For instance, in the Proton 21 experiment, copper demonstrates LENR activity when highly compressed through the use of a shock-wave that compresses the copper by the initiation of a powerful electric arc.

  • Interesting view. In the excerpt from your ICCF-21 presentation I transcribed a while back in this thread you mentioned that a sort of electrical "water hammer" effect could be involved in the electron shrinkage.


    Incidentally, the electrical equivalent of a water hammer is often considered to be a circuit with inductance. There, if current flow is suddenly changed, a counter EMF is produced. The larger the current and the more abrupt the change (and the higher the inductance), the more intense the "hammer effect", akin to what happens when trying to suddenly stop a large volume of high flowing water.


    Perhaps one could see similar results to using a large capacitor bank by abruptly interrupting a large current flow from a suitable coil or transformer?

    Just wanted to report that recently while playing around with my adjustable 30V/10A DC power supply I noticed that it seems much easier to initiate an electric arc, in particular over oxidized metal surfaces, if there is an inductor in series with the circuit (in my case, the high side of a 1:19 transformer). This reminded me of the "water hammer effect" mentioned by Simon Brink in the presentation I quoted above (more than 2 years ago), but probably I'm just reinventing the wheel and taking advantage of known and widely used phenomena (or not?).


    On a related note, Simon Brink's website is still getting occasionally updated, but it's difficult to figure out exactly what is going on in the photos and videos posted there. Prototypes have reached Generation 7.

  • yes, reinventing the wheel :)

    Just wanted to report that recently while playing around with my adjustable 30V/10A DC power supply I noticed that it seems much easier to initiate an electric arc, in particular over oxidized metal surfaces, if there is an inductor in series with the circuit (in my case, the high side of a 1:19 transformer). This reminded me of the "water hammer effect" mentioned by Simon Brink in the presentation I quoted above (more than 2 years ago), but probably I'm just reinventing the wheel and taking advantage of known and widely used phenomena (or not?).


    On a related note, Simon Brink's website is still getting occasionally updated, but it's difficult to figure out exactly what is going on in the photos and videos posted there. Prototypes have reached Generation 7.

  • Just wanted to report that recently while playing around with my adjustable 30V/10A DC power supply I noticed that it seems much easier to initiate an electric arc, in particular over oxidized metal surfaces, if there is an inductor in series with the circuit (in my case, the high side of a 1:19 transformer). This reminded me of the "water hammer effect" mentioned by Simon Brink in the presentation I quoted above (more than 2 years ago), but probably I'm just reinventing the wheel and taking advantage of known and widely used phenomena (or not?).


    On a related note, Simon Brink's website is still getting occasionally updated, but it's difficult to figure out exactly what is going on in the photos and videos posted there. Prototypes have reached Generation 7.

    Interrupting a current that flows through an inductor (coil) causes a high voltage peak over the coil.
    A very common known application is an ignition coil to cause a spark in a spark plug in a car motor.

    You could call this a hammer effect indeed.

  • Yes: without inductor (a transformer from an old 650VA UPS), brief sparks occurred due to lack of good electrical conduction. I believe that these sudden current interruption events caused strong back EMF when an inductor was present, initiating the electric arc through the surface oxide layer and reinforcing it when other micro-interruptions occurred.


    What I did was only bringing in contact the electrodes together as done during ordinary welding. One electrode was of graphite, the other of heavily oxidized copper. I was using 31V DC, current limited to 6–7 amperes, but possibly transients were of at least a few hundreds volts due to the inductor. For this kind of test a real welding power supply would be ideal, although on a small scale a bench power supply can work too.


    I made a video earlier but it is of poor quality (also because I was looking at the electrodes through the phone since the plasma was too bright); it should be apparent from it anyway that with an inductor in series it was simpler to obtain bright and smooth arcs—albeit short here.



    On its own this is not directly related to LENR, but it could be applied to systems using electric arcs or wetted/vaporizable electrodes (BLP, Simon Brink, etc).

  • What is basically happening when you mimic electric welding, is causing a high current by shortening the supply that has this coil in series. Within the coil a high electric field (EMF) is created due to the high shorting current. When next the shortening is interrupted this high electric field (an energy buffer) is converted back into electricity in the form of a high voltage that in turn causes the gas to ionize to a plasma (creating a current).


    Depending on the power supply it may further help to add a big capacitor in parallel to the voltage supply outlet which adds another energy buffer to allow even higher shortening currents.

  • Difficult to say whether it will help; it will also depend on capacitor size, characteristics of the arc, and so on. I'm not sure how such electric arc would be modeled with CircuitJS but I made an attempt below: Link to CircuitJS



    All things considered this is probably not an efficient way of running such reaction and using deliberately pulsed discharges might be preferrable (or at least that's what tends to be used in LENR or LENR-like studies).


    It appears by the way that some welding power supplies have an "inductance" knob, although it is used for different reasons than what I thought I observed above: What does inductance do? - TWI (twi-global.com). Welding users generally try to obtain a stable arc and to work with clean surfaces, though.

  • .......I just don't see the point in using such high voltages and currents for doing LENR research. Surely the idea is to achieve the same thing as a low power consuming LED light bulb??? But for a simple heater emitting in the infra-red??? We know now from Leif Holmlid's research which catalysts are required to do this in a practical low energy consuming device.The same mistake everyone is making is forgetting the Law of mass action (1) and the Law of E = mc to the power n where n can vary between 0 and infinity!!! (2). Furthermore we need a critical mass for the fusion LENR reactor to work efficiently (3). These are established FACTS. The mistakes are being made over and over again even after Wyttenbach's new SO4 physics theories proves the point.

  • Ups and Down


    Subtle Atomics research has largely been focused on pathways to dense hydrogen as a starting point to new energy systems.


    We have now reached a point where we can identify theoretically and experimentally that going below ground state for atomic H(n) hydrogen (BrLP model) and molecular states H2(n) is not actually possible.


    The good news however is that the ground state limit does not apply to metallic hydrogen states (m), consistent with the Holmlid model. The Subtle Atomic model also offers the additional development that at least 12 dense H metallic (m) states are identified, in addition to 32 expanded states.


    Atomic H models were not predicting known catalysts, particularly Fe, but the new dense metallic H model is demonstrating why Fe works, but more importantly is also enabling complex catalytic alloys to be engineered, produced and tested.


    And as a bonus, we can now explain BOTH dark matter and the likely chemical composition of the galactic black hole...


    Stay tuned