Obsidian coated Hematite as a capture device

  • Can heating of hematite cause the obsidian to become an attachment point if the assembly is submerged in a electrolyte supporting a galvanic corrosion state of decay?

    Can it be used as a host?

  • I think your post raises more questions than those you've explicitly put, but perhaps useful general discussion might still occur.


    How is obsidian-coated hematite formed in your case?

    Attachment point of what exactly?

    Host for what?


    Links I happened to open before writing this comment:

  • I am using a thermite mix with the added obsidian and hematite also in the mix with a series of collision areas to fracture the obsidian and hematite back down.

    Host-To trap an electric charge and isolated it to a new magnetic environment.

  • Basically do you plan (among other things) dropping ignited thermite into water or some sort of electrolyte solution? Steam explosions might occur so beware. The rapid cooling might cause some of the molten material to become glassy, which could fracture into sharp pieces also violently.


    Electrical charges tend to concentrate on sharp points, so I guess that interesting results might not be completely ruled out. Hard to tell for certain, though.

  • I am keeping the area of thremite separated so each event has time to stabilize before interaction. The water is only allowed to mix at the focus point of a 1/16 diameter hole at the exit. The part I'm concerned about is introducing the hot as hell hematite to the liquid aluminum soap.

    I Have paused for an opinion...



  • Electrical charges tend to concentrate on sharp points, so I guess that interesting results might not be completely ruled out. Hard to tell for certain, though.

    https://www.researchgate.net/p…nement-fusion-targets.pdf


    Hematite, also spelled as haematite, is the mineral form of iron(III) oxide (Fe2O3), one of several iron oxides.


    Iron Oxide is a prime generator of the LENR active agent (AA). Hydrogen concentrates inside the pores of the rust and compresses into ultra dense hydrogen.


    An alkali based electrolyte would increase the likelihood that AA would form in the Hematite

  • DnG

    I'm sorry, I'm out of ideas here. It would help to have a schematic or diagram of what you're trying to accomplish, but the above drawing is too cryptic for that.


    axil

    The iron oxide that is responsible for the catalytic activity and production of Rydberg matter/ultra-dense hydrogen in Holmlid's case is not hematite, but an unstable phase called Potassium Ferrite (KFeO2), which is formed at high temperature (as is well known in the petrochemical industry) in an oxidizing environment and/or under prolonged mild heating in a vacuum, and appears as black (can be mistaken for magnetite) or dark olive green when formed (according to the literature). A while back I dedicated a thread about it: How to properly treat potassium-iron oxide catalysts


    However, since it's mainly useful due to its ability of donating electrons to the adsorbed atoms I guess one could argue that if there's already a presence of excess electrons (e.g. in an electrolytic environment) perhaps there's no need of such finicky phase.