Hawking Radiation and Black Hole Thermodynamics

  • All we can "see" and detect in different spectra, including jets of radiation and "spewed out" matter doesn't come from inside a black hole (based on currently accepted knowledge(. What's happening exactly at and beyond the event horizon / SR will probably remain just a theory for a long time, if not forever...the only thing what we know better today - again a confirmation of an important topic in Einsteins theory of relativity - is generation (and detection) of gravity waves (LISA and merging BH's). BH's can obviously grow by merging with other BH's (but also losing huge mass via gravity waves), or by swallowing other interstellar matter (e.g. gas, stars)...

  • Isn't what you describe a Neutron Star?


    According to the theory, probably quite similar, except that a black hole is spinning much faster, so is more like a solenoid, whereas a neutron star does not have the same angular momentum, so remains more spherical. Unclear whether the masses are neutrons, nucleons or atoms with highly contracted electrons. Potentially the neutron star is more neutral and the black hole is more charged, with greater separation of positive and negative components.

  • You miss the point: Black hole people believe that information must be conserved inside a black hole what is absolute nonsense!


    aha. That was the topic to be argued about.

    Basically I favorize Your point of view. Nothing survives in a black hole, so why should information be an exception?
    Talking ala Shannon, information is a degree of entropy, right ?

  • Entropy is a degree of order...

    " aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa"

    is extremely ordered, with low entropy.. but is information poor.


    Only information poor in this context, in other context - for an easy example a string of telemetry data - your ''a'' might be very information-rich. It is a mistake to view information as an absolute, like beauty it is in the eye of the beholder.

    Equally, Hawkin radiation might contain a great deal of information leaving a black hole, the beauty and complexity of which we have yet to appreciate.

  • Only information poor in this context, in other context - for an easy example a string of telemetry data - your ''a'' might be very information-rich. It is a mistake to view information as an absolute, like beauty it is in the eye of the beholder.

    Equally, Hawkin radiation might contain a great deal of information leaving a black hole, the beauty and complexity of which we have yet to appreciate.

    It could be interesting in ..if a DNA type membrane was used as a ...rabbit hole~ ..