Observing hydrogen's effects in metal

  • hydrogen embrittlement in metals especially hot ones like tungsten at 1723C

    has been an inconvenient truth for a long time( as well as neutrogenic transmutation)

    Huddersfield revelation about the holey grail is old news.

    https://phys.org/news/2018-04-…lear-fusion-reactors.html


    ""Tungsten 'too brittle' for nuclear fusion reactors""


    .but wait... lithium is coming to the rescue.. by 2050..so they say..


    maybe ITER could try a ceramic or Epsom salts or gypsum


    or better.... try to get rid of the heat and neutrons another way..

  • The compression of hydrogen in metals is how ultra dense hydrogen is formed. Lattice confinement can compress hydrogen to high levels, high enough to form the ultra dense state, this is the primary step in the LENR process.

  • What is the hydrogen compression mechanism?

    The compression of hydrogen in metals is how ultra dense hydrogen is formed. Lattice confinement can compress hydrogen to high levels, high enough to form the ultra dense state, this is the primary step in the LENR process.

  • Don't you need Fe2O3 doped with K to produce UDH? H or D ions in the metallic Ni or Pd lattice has been modelled as a 'plasma' state with free electron sharing etc - the compression idea comes from recoil collision theory applied to overcome Coulomb repulsion.

  • My agenda is not quite the same as most in here, to sustain a microwave even silver can bring about a burst in a metallic dust for the sole purpose of a moving a hot cathode through a magntron to sustain a microwave, I'm not on the same page.

  • How about using alpha-MnO2 as a substrate for hosting LENR - its crystal lattice structure looks ideal for rotatoral H species as described in Wyttenbach's patent (about 0.5 nm vacancies) and can be easily doped with Ni and/or Li. See -

    To overcome this disadvantage of structural destabilization and to enhance the electronic transport in MnO2 that facilitates the discharge/charge rate of the electrode, doping with various elements, i.e., Ag, Sn, V, Ni, Cu, Al, etc., has been proposed [10,134,135]. The use of selected doping elements allows the properties of α-MnO2 to be tuned for practical applications. For example, alkali ions such as Li+ (0.076 nm ionic radius) are easily housed inthe (2×2)tunnels (0.48nmsize) andcanmovefreelyunderelectrochemicalstimulus. Such physical behavior has been applied to batteries and supercapacitors [1].

    from review-

    Nanostructured MnO2 as Electrode Materials for Energy Storage

    Christian M. Julien * ID and Alain Mauger Institut de Minéralogie, de Physique des Matériaux et de Cosmochimie (IMPMC), Unité Mixte de Recherche 7590, Sorbonne Universités, 75005 Paris, France; [email protected] * Correspondence: [email protected]; Tel.: +33-144-272-443 Received: 14 October 2017; Accepted: 5 November 2017; Published: 17 November 2017

    Abstract: Manganese dioxides, inorganic materials which have been used in industry for more than a century, now find great renewal of interest for storage and conversion of energy applications. In this review article, we report the properties of MnO2 nanomaterials with different morphologies. Techniques used for the synthesis, structural, physical properties, and electrochemical performances of periodic and aperiodic frameworks are discussed. The effect of the morphology of nanosized MnO2 particles on their fundamental features is evidenced. Applications as electrodes in lithium batteries and supercapacitors are examined.

  • How about using alpha-MnO2 as a substrate for hosting LENR - its crystal lattice structure looks ideal for rotatoral H species as described in Wyttenbach's patent (about 0.5 nm vacancies)


    Mn is a potent host for LENR as it has two different magnetic states in the low energy spectrum. I do suspect if LENR happens in Bacteria Mn is one key player.

  • Also MnO2 absorbs H very well when mixed with Pd-carbon catalyst to split molecular H2 into atomic H to form MnOOH (this would probably work with Ni too). Be interesting to see if this absorbed H would interact to form rotators and thus lead to LENR....one could either study it in a dry gas experiment or using electrolysis with a compound MnO2 electrode (which can simply be removed from a Duracell zinc-MnO2 battery). Should be interesting and could be easily scaled up since MnO2 is cheap and is also very well-studied since it has been used widely in batteries and supercapacitors.

  • Maybe the successful experiments by A. Takahashi showing MJ excess heat production using Pd/Ni nanoparticle mixes with a ZrO2 host substrate could be simply replicated using MnO2 instead. Throw in some Fe2O3 doped with K (Holmlid) to form UDH and we might at long last see some rapid-reaction cold fusion. Now we all know that AR never had anything, its back to inspired guesswork, atom ecology experimental-based evidence.

  • Dr Richard

    A zeolite-type, K-doped manganese oxide catalyst synthesized ex-novo has been already shown to produce K Rydberg matter by heating in a vacuum; it's probably also good for UDH production too without the need to also add K-Fe2O3 catalyst.


    See: Emission of highly excited electronic states of potassium from cryptomelane nanorods (2015)


    Quote

    Abstract: Cryptomelane (KMn8O16) nanorods were synthesized, characterized (XRD, Raman spectroscopy, TEM/SAED) and investigated by species resolved thermal desorption of potassium from the material in the range of 20-620 °C. The desorbing fluxes of ions, atoms and highly excited electronic states (field ionizable Rydberg states) were measured using an ion collector, surface ionization and field ionization detectors, respectively, in a vacuum apparatus. The non-equilibrium emission of potassium Rydberg species (principal quantum number > 30) strongly depends on the surface positive voltage bias with a broad maximum at 1-8 V. The stimulation of Rydberg species emission is discussed in terms of spatial and energetic overlapping between the electron cloud above the cryptomelane surface and the desorbing potassium ion.


    Note that Holmlid is a coauthor.

  • using hematite as a draw to center magnetic mixed in ... can also help to keep the system moving. why I use aluminum ,after the flash what renames is the metal lattice being attacked by the hydrogen's effect from the sea water and gallium