Japan LENR Updates


  • I did not know this. Without an electrolyzer, distilled water being an insulator will just boil. This setup should have worked or at least produce oxyhydrogen, it just lacked an alkali additive. It looks like the electrolyzer is the key to this oxyhydrogen generation method.

  • One of the points in the paper is that the flame of the burning of this gas is relatively cold, 130°C, which is consistent with what Bob Greenyer measured with the Optris, albeit I don't know how the guys that report that temperature that King quotes performed the measurement (I e-mailed them asking, hope they answer).

    The reference for the 130 C is [3] this website , unless there is another 130 C mentioned.

    The website reference seems to be regarding the torch tip temperature, not a flame temperature. The website comment is correct that the BG flame radiates very little heat.


    Later I found the same reference [3] above repeated , but also [14] is referenced for 130 C, found here . The first sentence of the report mentions George Wiseman, owner of the website above, and is therefore likely the source of the 130 C (134 C) temperature again.

  • Here they supposedly measured a flame temperature between 124 and 144 °C, but it's a technical report from a company which sells oxyhydrogen (so-called "HHO") systems:


    https://www.researchgate.net/p…016c508ae07629e5283f0.pdf

    Wow Can, thanks for that technical report, it shows a completely different approach for the temperature assesment and it agrees with the IR measuring. So, it seems that the flame is indeed that cool. It also says that a part of the gas produced in their electrolyzer is indeed water electrically bound, and shows an electric arc passing through the flame which IMHO is very interesting. It also shows ceramic and cement melted by the flame, which should not occur with a flame so cool, but happens somehow.


    This is becoming much more interesting as it goes.

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • In the upcoming ICCF22 conference, Tadahiko Mizuno will report increased excess heat with nickel mesh coated with palladium. The results are dramatic, so we decided to upload a preprint of his paper. To understand the calorimetry, you have to read his ICCF21 paper. Unfortunately, the ICCF21 Proceedings have not yet been published. So I decided to upload preprints of both papers:


    ICCF21: Mizuno, T. and J. Rothwell, Excess Heat from Palladium Deposited on Nickel (preprint). J. Condensed Matter Nucl. Sci., 2019. 29


    http://lenr-canr.org/acrobat/MizunoTexcessheata.pdf


    ICCF22: Mizuno, T. and J. Rothwell. Increased Excess Heat from Palladium Deposited on Nickel (Preprint). in The 22nd International Conference for Condensed Matter Nuclear Science ICCF-22. 2019. Assisi, Italy


    http://lenr-canr.org/acrobat/MizunoTincreasede.pdf


    Here is the abstract for the latest paper:



    Abstract


    We have developed an improved method of producing excess heat with nickel mesh coated with palladium. The new method produces higher power, a larger output to input ratio, and it can be controlled effectively. With 50 W of input, it produces ~250 W of excess heat, and with 300 W it produces ~2 to 3 kW. This paper is a comprehensive description of the apparatus, the reactant, and the method. We hope this paper will allow others to replicate the experiment.



    Detailed discussion here Mizuno reports increased excess heat

  • Here they supposedly measured a flame temperature between 124 and 144 °C, but it's a technical report from a company which sells oxyhydrogen (so-called "HHO") systems:


    https://www.researchgate.net/p…016c508ae07629e5283f0.pdf

    Haha. The Eckman 2008 paper referenced for the temperature in the paper above reports 130 F (54.4 C), not 130 C. And of course, the InfraCAM SD used for the Eckman report operates in the 7.5 to 13 um range, which is useless for combustion columns of HHO, oxyhydrogen, oxypropane etc.


    https://www.scribd.com/documen…ns-Gas-What-Exactly-is-It


    https://www.instrumart.com/pro…nfracam-sd-thermal-imager

  • Here they supposedly measured a flame temperature between 124 and 144 °C, but it's a technical report from a company which sells oxyhydrogen (so-called "HHO") systems:


    https://www.researchgate.net/p…016c508ae07629e5283f0.pdf

    It will take a bit to work through what is claimed in this paper.


    Edit:

    There are substantial amounts of data available for download for this paper. The author is highly commended on that. The calculation spreadsheets are actually available.


    One thing that is apparent is that only one state of H and O are considered, just 1/3 O2 and 2/3 H2. OH is neglected.


    There is no laser wavelength refraction adjustment for atmosphere, but that is possibly negligible.


    There is an extra table showing an emissivity-temperature re-calculation. It appears to show an IR spot size larger than the flame width. A wiki link and a reference to the emissivity of copper is mysteriously supplied.

  • OK. There is a possibility that the temperature calculated in the Stankovic paper is close to correct. This is because the area 1.4 mm from the nozzle, the part calculated in the paper, is the coldest part of the flame. The flame here is mostly uncombusted gas, except for the outer “surface”. The hottest part of the flame is actually almost out of top of the image in Figure 4. Perhaps 20 mm from the nozzle might have given a very high temperature.


    Attached below is a flame temperature profile provided by a electrolyser torch supplier.


    https://www.aquaflamesystems.c…e-Explanation-Diagram.pdf