Frederick J.Mayer​: Superconductivity and low-energy nuclear reactions - Elsevier/ScienceDirect

  • I just fall on reddit on this article featured and commented by Zephir_AWT by FJ Mayer

    Superconductivity and low-energy nuclear reactions - Frederick J.Mayer

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/…cle/pii/S2211379719302372

    Quote

    Abstract

    It is proposed that the excess-energy released in Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions (aka cold fusion) is initiated in a phase-transition yielding a fraction of superconducting electrons, which then start a deuteron-driven chain of nuclear reactions recently detailed in the geophysics arena.


    it looks it was discussed earlier, but I don't see it .. It does not seem 1-dimentional...


    I remember Paolo Tripodi clearly shown that PdDx with X>1 is a HT superconductor, and as it is clear for many that the key to LENR is collective effects, superconduction is one of the key origin or at least inspiration model.

    Explanations, ELI5 and comments are welcome...

  • Maybe a simpler theoretical approach would be to consider spin-aligned superconducting electrons functioning like muons. Interesting that H-absorption by Ni removes its ferromagnetic properties (Skoskiewicz) suggesting that protons disrupt the electron spin alignment normally giving rise to the magnetic fields. At high H loading the electrons become superconducting (as Cooper pairs) so are then capable of drawing adjacent deuterons/protons close together enough to initiate tunneling through the C-barrier and thus fusion. Whether hydronium ions are involved or not its certainly worthwhile studying other H/D absorbing superconductors for LENR activity.


    Preparation of superconducting hydrides of palladium‐nickel alloys under high hydrogen pressures


    T. Skośkiewicz

    First published: 16 August 1978
    https://doi.org/10.1002/pssa.2210480260
    Cited by: 9

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    Superconductivity in palladium hydride and deuteride at 52–61 kelvin
    H. M. Syed, T. J. Gould, C. J. Webb and E. MacA. Gray*
    Queensland Micro- and Nanotechnology Centre, Griffith University, Nathan 4111, Brisbane,
    Australia
    *e-mail: [email protected]
    Abstract
    We report the observation of conventional superconductivity at the highest temperature yet attained
    without mechanical compression, around 54 kelvin in palladium-hydride and 60 kelvin in
    palladium-deuteride. The remarkable increase in Tc compared to the previously known value was
    achieved by rapidly cooling the hydride and deuteride after loading with hydrogen or deuterium at
    elevated temperature. Our results encourage hope that conventional superconductivity under
    ambient conditions will be discovered in materials with very high hydrogen density, as predicted
    more than a decade ago.
    1. Introduction
    Conventional superconductivity at about ten kelvin was discovered in palladium-hydride and
    palladium-deuteride in 1972[1,2], raising hopes that the high density of hydrogen in metal-hydrides
    and compounds containing a high density of hydrogen might lead to metallic hydrogen behaviour[3].
    No high-temperature hydride superconductors were found. Prior to the 1986 discovery of hightemperature superconductivity in cuprate ceramics[4], for which the current record superconducting
    transition temperature (Tc) is 164 K under high mechanical pressure[5], the highest recorded Tc was
    22.4 K[6]. Attention then focused on non-conventional cuprates until the discovery of conventional
    superconductivity at 39 kelvin in magnesium-diboride[7], then on the 2008 discovery of iron-based
    superconductors[8], with Tc values still not exceeding 58 K despite intense research effort[9].
    Recently Drozdov et al.[10] found that 140 GPa mechanical pressure induced conventional
    superconductivity in sulfur-hydride at 203 K.
    PdHx is superconducting[1] for 0.7 1.0 < Tc(H)) in PdH/D at low temperatures can be
    understood in the following way. The potential at the oct site is strongly anharmonic, with a
    positive anharmonicity parameter, meaning that the interstitial atom sees a hardening potential as its
    total energy increases. The effect is to shift the bulk of the pDOS associated with H/D to higher
    frequencies. As shown by Errea et al.[27], this increases ωlog (see §2.2.) somewhat, but also strongly
    decreases λ, with the result that Tc is suppressed by a factor approaching ten for H. The heavier D
    interstitial sits lower in its potential well and sees a somewhat softer potential, so that anharmonicity
    reduces Tc by a smaller factor than for H, resulting in a positive isotope effect.
    Here we report the observation of superconductivity at around 54 kelvin in palladiumhydride and 60 kelvin in palladium-deuteride. The remarkable increase in Tc compared to the
    previously known value was achieved by rapidly cooling the hydride and deuteride after loading
    with hydrogen or deuterium at elevated temperature. Our results encourage hope that conventional
    superconductivity under ambient conditions will be discovered in materials with very high
    hydrogen density, as predicted more than a decade ago[28].