March 23, 2019 Saturday night Party Playlist

  • Some obscure but relevant favorites:

    Bjork - Crystalline

    Crystallizing galaxies

    Spread out like my fingers

    Internal Nebula (crystalline)

    Rocks growing slowmo (crystalline)

    Conquer claustrophobia (crystalline)
    And demand the light


    King Gizzard - Nuclear Fusion

    The devil's inside all the detail

    The title runs wild under veil

    Coming together in the pattern

    Fit tightly like a dovetail
    Nuclear fusion

    All the bonds that be couldn't break us

    Exponentially in fine feather

    We're essentially one being

    All the bonds that be couldn't tear us

    From eventually fusing tightly

    We're essentially one being

    Nuclear fusion


    Vampgirl1999 - "Cold Fusion Debate" (soundtrack)


    And some old classics;

    Stones - "Start Me Up"

    Doors - "Light My Fire"

  • River runs red - Midnight Oil, written in 1989



    So you cut all the tall trees down, you poisoned the sky and the sea

    You've taken what's good from the ground

    But you've left precious little for me

    You remember the flood and the fall, we remember the light on the hill

    There should be enough for us all, but the dollar is driving us still
    River runs red, black rain falls, dust in my hand

    River runs red, black rain falls, on my bleeding land

  • One planet is one people. Oil is the blood of the planet Earth, it can not be touched and devastate the lithosphere. Oil is needed by the planet itself so that people can live on it. For this we need to urgently look for new energy and save the planet!

  • I give. This is my favorite all time Prince Albert symphonic opener, followed by the Moody Blues "Tuesday", then their other hits. Yeah, yeah, old geezers I know, so the rules change yet again! :) Say what you will about those Brits, but they know their music:


  • WOW, what a great playlist!


    I can't wait till 2029!


    There WAS a party here in Boston. Dinner, drinks at Legal Seafood. Mmmm, delicious. There was going to be a DJ, too! but unfortunately that wasn't feasible in the room we were in, so we didn't get the opportunity to jam the set. I was singing (oin my mind) all day FIIIII-YUH unh-unh-unh unh-unh-unh DROP FIIII-YUH.... We need to change the lyrics to (new) FIIII-Yuh.


    The lectures are being videod by Anthropocene Institute and they should be available in a couple weeks (so I heard). Anthropocene hosted the party too so it was really awesome for them to do all of that for the very large group (over 100 registered for the event). They are also getting some interviews and are going to make a short movie to be released at some point.


    Yesterdays lectures were really good, focusing on experimental results, though nothing super new. Excellent results from Brilloin, and also Peter Hagelstein revealed some new theoretical results that are matching data well, and he was happy. Mitchell Schwartz showed numerous graphs of the Phusor and NANOR which is a low-power unit, but very reliable. Right now it's theory. I actually ended up presenting Melvin Miles' talk on helium as he wasn't able to make the event. I was a out of my element to say the least, but I didn't crash and burn either!


    I've been getting my own interviews with a few folks here for a doc too, but that movie won't even start to be edited until next year.....


    OK, back to heavy science download....


    Ruby

  • The lectures are being videod by Anthropocene Institute and they should be available in a couple weeks (so I heard). Anthropocene hosted the party too so it was really awesome for them to do all of that for the very large group (over 100 registered for the event). They are also getting some interviews and are going to make a short movie to be released at some point.


    https://www.anthropoceneinstitute.com/


    That is Carl Page's endeavor. Good on him for doing all that. Keep up the great work Ruby.

  • I actually ended up presenting Melvin Miles' talk on helium


    I guess the talk was based on Miles' retrospective January,2019 paper

    The Production Of Helium In Cold Fusion Experiments

    Which concluded

    "" Nevertheless, the reported helium-4 detection limit by both CalTech and MIT was one part per million (ppm) or 1000 ppb.

    By using Equations 1 with R = 1000 ppb (1.0x10-6), the excess power would have to be 8.94 W. From Table 1,

    1000 ppb helium-4 would require more than 20 times the highest excess power listed for our experiments or about 10 W.

    With such a large excess power, most calorimetric cells would be driven to boiling just by the fusion energy alone.

    Such large amounts of excess enthalpy would be very obvious even without the use of calorimetry,

    but the amounts of helium-4 produced would barely reach the detection limit reported by these two prestigious universities.

      Why was such a glaring error in the CalTech and MIT results missed by the reviewers for these publications? I

    t seems like almost anything was accepted by major journals, such as Nature and Science, in 1989

    if it helped to establish the desired conclusion that reports of cold fusion were not correct.

    The answer to the last question might include the two words "" reviewer bias""..

    something to be aware of in all peer reviews of paradigm breaking research.

    Extraordinary evidence ( rather than sufficient scientific evidence) is needed to overcome extraordinary unscientific bias.

  • https://www.researchgate.net/p…origin=publication_detail

    R = 1000 ppb (1.0x10-6), the excess power would have to be 8.94 W. (Melvin Miles)


    Actually Melvin Miles did not have sufficient power levels to generate 1000ppb

    but managed to detect 8.5 ppb.. after lots of work.


    Probably in Essex with excess power in the 10- 50...100W?? level

    the task of He4 detection should be easier..

    1ppm is not enough for a party balloon though.