LENR Futures - what will they look like?

  • It would take one or more truly impressive demonstrations of heat production

    All of the major cold fusion experiments are truly impressive demonstrations of heat production. That is why they convinced scientists at 180 labs to replicate. That is why Heinz Gerischer, the Director of the Max Planck

    Institute for Physical Chemistry, wrote: "there [are] now undoubtedly overwhelming indications that nuclear processes take place in metal alloys."


    Seven_of_twenty is not impressed either because he has not looked at the results, or because he does not understand them. If the researchers in New Zealand are not impressed, that is because they have not looked. I know only three scientists who looked carefully at the results but were not impressed or convinced: Huizenga, Morrison and Shanahan. There may be some others, but they did not publish papers so I don't know whether they looked or what they concluded. All other evaluations I have seen were written by people similar to Seven_of_twenty who have no idea what they are talking about, and who get every detail wrong.


  • In the 60's there was a Russian-made Kerosene lamp - very cheap - that was very popular in parts of Africa - it had some kind of TEG in it which powered a tiny 2 transistor AM radio. It was a Trevor Baylis kind of thing before ol' Trevor was on the scene.

  • In the 60's there was a Russian-made Kerosene lamp - very cheap - that was very popular in parts of Africa - it had some kind of TEG in it which powered a tiny 2 transistor AM radio.


    That may have been a good idea back then, but nowadays the best solution is solar cells and reliable lead-acid batteries.


    People in the Third World really do treasure those things. This is not something we, or the Gates Foundation, gives them that they actually have little use for. Here is one of the many heartbreaking descriptions from news reports of the Rohingya genocide in Myanmar. An old woman was seen fleeing, carrying only a few possessions, including a solar panel.


    People in the Third World also treasure cell phones and bicycles. I wish we could somehow give them to everyone there who wants one. They are tremendously useful for making a living in farming and other rural occupations, and for literacy. It is not well known, but 80% of Third World adults are literate, which is one of the main reasons extreme poverty in these countries has declined so much in recent decades, from 36% in 1990 to 10% now. Unless global warming or some other catastrophe occurs, there is no reason why extreme poverty cannot be eliminated by 2030. That's the plan, and it is realistic. See:


    https://www.worldbank.org/en/n…but-has-slowed-world-bank


    You can thank the U.N. and the Gates Foundation for that, but mostly thank the formerly impoverished people themselves. Think of what cold fusion would do for them!


    See the video "Don't Panic," especially regarding literacy and bicycles. Bicycles are an example of cheap, decentralized, transformative technology at its best.