MIZUNO REPLICATION AND MATERIALS ONLY

  • A Triac dimmer is the cheapest solution, like this one ;-


    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/AC-…id=p2047675.c100005.m1851


    The downside is that the output is very 'noisy' But you get what you can pay for (sadly).

    Not only is the output noisy, but the voltage often wanders significantly at a given setting (especially below the 1/2 maximum output level) due to operating temperature changes (and who knows what else), and is also extremely dependent on the stability of the input voltage. Some clip the lower end of the voltage output to a minimum of 20-30 V AC (because of the unit circuitry minimum voltage requirements), or need a ~20 V output setting “kick start”, and others clip from the top end of the voltage 15-30V from the input peak, in order to supply adjustability to the 0-30 V output range (so controlled motors, lights etc. fully turn off).


    You get what you pay for is right.

  • Can anyone recommend a cheap power supply that runs on 110V and goes up to 500W?


    https://www.amazon.com/GE-WB24…nite-Switch/dp/B003BNZ4YK


    Simply use an electric range rheostat switch. Or borrow one from your stove. ;)



    Or even cheaper:



    http://www.captoscana.com/capt…posite%20construction.pdf


    I build a lot of stuff. Hope this helps.


    Tell us what you have access to and we can likely come up with something to meet the need. Enjoy.

  • The Mizuno mesh is 'twill weave' I'm pretty sure that makes little difference. The critical thing is always 'process knowledge. When you have done a lot of lab work you learn to 'fill in the gaps' in descriptions of a method. But, you can never be sure you filled them in in the right way when attempting a close replication.

    Precisely, sir. Which is, of course, why I was making the point regarding as much detailed information as possible. Close replication of some experiment is one thing, but when the stakes are this high, it is vital to put the utmost dillingence into attaining a positive result, n'est ce pas? As the bloke with the little grey cells would say.


    Incidentally, I have modelled the new twill pattern in CAD, and the difference is that for the same depth of cut, (and the size of the sites matches AlanG's SEM image well), the double twill has 1/2 of the reactive area. Of course as it matches the mesh that TM used, it will at least give a similar result. However, there do seem to be inconsistencies with the sites produced by abrasive paper. There should be a herring bone pattern, and one the SEM, some of the sites are missing. But I suppose the is just part of the randomness of a manual rather than machine treatment.

  • I respectfully disagree, Stevie. The stakes need not, and should not condition experimentation to the point of inaction.


    I train Basketball players on shooting. Two key concepts: "Everything I shoot goes in." All shots are just one shot.


    Continous effort, real or imagined, produces results. What those results might be can vary. But to get real results others can touch, you need to take physical action at some juncture. Analogues or near/similar experiments should be encouraged in my opinion.


    No disrespect intended, Steve.

  • You might find this useful- from the man himself. But puzzlingly showing a different piece of palladium, a different size heater, and Chinese mesh not Japanese.


    Diameter 20 mm, length 300 mm, voltage 220 V, power 1500 W


    Nickel mesh, nickel mesh 180 mesh, purity N4, produced in China


    Heater installed in reactor.


    Palladium rod.

  • A 30V supply will not be enough for some sheath heaters, and cannot get to the 500W that Mizuno used in any case.


    You might consider a Variac instead. These are electrically quieter than switching supplies or triac dimmers because the variation is done by changing the transformer coupling. They are also very inexpensive.


    Here is one that would heat up to 1000W (1000VA with a resistive load), and it is only $69. You would want to use it with a heater that is designed for 120V.


    https://www.amazon.com/YaeCCC-…64625627&s=gateway&sr=8-1

  • I like the HP/Agilent 65XX series of analog supplies. They're widely available on eBay and surplus electronics dealers for $500 or less. I got a 6555A for this project, $220 with shipping. It's 0-120 vdc @ 0-4a, and 500 watts max. It has both constant current and constant voltage adjustments, and fully isolated output. These weigh around 35 kg and are beautifully built and very reliable. Some versions with GPIB interface may cost a bit more.


    AlanG

  • I like the HP/Agilent 65XX series of analog supplies. They're widely available on eBay and surplus electronics dealers for $500 or less. I got a 6555A for this project, $220 with shipping. It's 0-120 vdc @ 0-4a, and 500 watts max. It has both constant current and constant voltage adjustments, and fully isolated output. These weigh around 35 kg and are beautifully built and very reliable. Some versions with GPIB interface may cost a bit more.


    AlanG

    just don’t use the HP 65 series for large battery chargers, any back emf ( IE you dial the voltage back or the main quits) and they make a lot of smoke and they are a pain to repair

  • If you have the $$ you might just want to get a TMP system such as the Leybold Turbolab so that it has all the connections, roughing pump, controller, systems to turn off the TMP until the roughing pump pulls a fair vac, and so on. https://www.idealvac.com/Turbo…ms-NEW/pl/1363-44-232-414


    Waste of money. You simply run the rougher through the turbopump until you get to about 2 Torr or better, then flip the switch on the turbopump to pump it down. After it has stabilized you then turn the baking heat on to outgas the water and volatiles.

  • None taken Nick. I am totally on board with everything you said. My work requires the utmost dilligence and determination through adversity. Giving up is not the order of the day. Persistence is omnipotent.


    I was not trying to say that high stakes mean no action, quite the opposite. I was just trying to make the point that with the stakes so high, it is more vital than with a normal replication, to get the best information possible about what was done. We have already seen from the Pd rod and AlanG's ESM image that there may well be variables that we are totally unaware of, and a slight deviation, even unknowingly, may result in failure.


    If I might just refine what I meant using your basketball analogy: your philosophy is excellent, but if you apply it to shooting at a basket that you can "see", but unbeknown to you there is a trick of the light, and it is actually 3 feet further along the wall, then you aren't going to get many in.


    Of course, that does not mean that we should not take the best shot that we think we have, and go for it.


  • Well said. Epistemic humility is vital given how new and novel the experiment is.

  • Is the Pd in the chuck a recommendation to take the mesh and rub it against a turning piece of Pd?