A young smart guy who recently started making his own experiment

  • Hi David.


    I (and Russ) know this guy very well, and do help him where I can - he also visited our lab a couple of times.. Very smart, very sincere, and as a plasma physics PhD very knowledgeable. If anybody else is wondering 'should I help?' I would say "Yes please do- It's a worthy cause."

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    It is called heavy water and I need 2 litres of it. Details are coming soon.


    Umm, I wouldn't publicly support any research which isn't completely public as well. For asking two liters of heavy water you should already publish some results with let say 50 ml of heavy water.

    In addition two liters of heavy water is more than plethora for everyone, who just wants to check some plasma technology stuff.

    It's matter of plain mass ratio for example: how large mass of plasma should be in balance with two kilos of heavy water?

  • Heavy water is indeed expensive once you need to purchase it for experiments. The sources shared here when I asked proved to be far less expensive than the local ones, but so far United Nuclear says they can’t ship it internationally, so I understand the frustration of trying to source it at a less bloated price.


    I think Matt has invented a whole new category of science experimentation: gone are the old days of the backyard inventor, we are now in the era of the bedroom inventor! Kudos to him for his enthusiasm and willingness to try to reproduce “impossible things” for himself.

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • I am always very hesitant to criticise anybody who is prepared to get their shorts dirty at the laboratory bench, it is far too easy. And I know why he needs 2 litres of D20, it's a perfectly legitimate requirement.

  • My own project in the works includes two liters of D2O but this is because I plan to perform a couple of hundreds of repetitions with and without 5% D2O. You can’t criticize the amount just because you thinks is too much. If someone plans to generate 200 repetitions with 5 ml of heavy water you need one liter for the experiment and one for the control.

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • Heavy water is indeed expensive once you need to purchase it for experiments. The sources shared here when I asked proved to be far less expensive than the local ones,


    The cost depends on purity. Highly pure heavy water is far more expensive.


    Years ago, some Chinese sources were supposedly very cheap.

  • The cost depends on purity. Highly pure heavy water is far more expensive.


    Years ago, some Chinese sources were supposedly very cheap.

    Well, here in Chile one liter from either Sigma Aldrich or Merck Millipore costs around USD 2500 (99,5% D2O). United Nuclear and other source recommended from the USA costs USD 760 per liter (99,5% D2O as per their specs). Alan Smith has a UK source close in price to the USA sources (around USD 790 per liter if I recall correctly). How do these compare with your suppliers?

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

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    I am always very hesitant to criticise anybody who is prepared to get their shorts dirty at the laboratory bench, it is far too easy. And I know why he needs 2 litres of D20, it's a perfectly legitimate requirement.


    What he needs 2 litres for? Even his reactor is much smaller than two litres. On his video he talks about replication with hydrogen - not water.


    Quote

    If someone plans to generate 200 repetitions with 5 ml of heavy water you need one liter for the experiment and one for the control.


    At first, such a water should be reused. At second, the process which needs 200 repetitions for to manifest itself has no chance to success anyway. At any case, he already collected 200$, which should be enough for 40 repetitions.

  • Hi Everyone 👋, I'm Matt Lilley of CasualPhysics.


    Firstly, thanks so much David for sharing my GoFundMe page - I really appreciate the extra exposure. Thanks also for those taking the time to engage on this thread - I appreciate your attention and fully understand that you have questions.


    Perhaps some extra information will be helpful.


    I'll start with directly addressing your main question of why I need 2L of heavy water (I appreciate that it's a lot). In short, I am making my hydrogen as I need it using this hydrogen generator and it requires a minimum of 1.5L of water to work. The reason I'm using a generator rather than a small lecture bottle filled with gas is for safety reasons - using a generator means I'm never storing any hydrogen in my flat. I have ambitions to get my own lab space but this is unfortunately way outside what I can afford myself at this stage - maybe they'll be people at ICCF-22 who can help with that.


    Next, the question of openness. I have a very strong belief that the only way LENR will achieve its full potential is through an open-source approach. If you read my two page primer at https://cor.energy/ (after the vision section) hopefully you'll get a sense of that. Open source hardware is a challenge, but Arduino has shown it can be done, so I'm hopeful that we can do the same with LENR. I apologise for the minimal state of my cor.energy website - it is not my intention to be secretive, it's just a matter of human resource...it's just me at the moment and I've got to be ruthless about what I prioritise. I am currently in the process of migrating my blog to a public GitHub repository. This will allow me to store ideas, progress, code, data, etc, and get real time feedback from the community and have a space for more formal open peer review.....all in one place. This is not supposed to be a competitor to the established LENR forum - but more of an experiment to see the role GitHub might play in open research.


    Now for some more general information about me and my background.


    I am a physicist. I spent the first 10 years of my professional life doing hot fusion research. I got my PhD at Imperial College London (2005 - 2009), working closely with the UK's national fusion lab CCFE. I spent some time overseas - Sweden for my postdoc, I collaborated with labs in California and Austin Texas. It was during my fellowship back at Imperial, when I was in control of my own research budget, that I became really interested in alternative fusion ideas, e.g. polywell, the penning trap, galateas, and when I got involved with the UK's first fusion startup Tokamak Energy. We submitted a joint proposal together to bring a £1.6M device they built into Imperial College to do some research. Its rejection was a clear signal to me that doing genuinely novel fusion research was going to be extremely difficult inside an academic context.


    So, a couple of friends and I set out to become self funded researchers. We decided to makes apps - because that's what everyone was doing back in 2014. I didn't make billions, but I learnt a lot during that process, mainly about what not to do in projects. e.g. I learnt that ideas are cheap and execution is the hard part, don't hold onto your ideas for too long…because they might be bad and you need to know that, and premature optimisation is the devil! I also learnt to code (we had to build everything ourselves). Along with my background in teaching from academia and private tutoring, my coding skills helped get me some part time work teaching people about technology.


    That was the start of 2017. At that time I was fully aware of LENR and had already done a mini pitch with my friends back in 2016 to try and raise some money to set up a lab. I was not however living and breathing LENR day to day. From the start of 2017 to today it's been a process of gradually carving out more time for LENR. It started with taking off 1 day per week from paid work and using the other 4 days to pay the bills and then at the start of 2019 I was fortunate to be in a position to work 2 weeks out of energy 4 on LENR and the other 2 paying the bills. Now that I have more time, I've been able to push forward on my own experiment and at the same time build my network in the LENR community (people like Alan Smith and Ed Storms have been invaluable to me) and try and generate LENR interest in the public realm.


    Going forwards, it is my intention to raise money and build a team to pursue multiple LENR approaches in parallel - nature is leaving pieces of the puzzle in many places and we need to go gather them all up if we are to have any hope of seeing the whole picture.


    Thanks again for your time and attention and for considering supporting my heavy water purchase 🙏





  • Alan Smith

    How could have more information about what he plan to do ? his ideas ?

    Because someone skilled in plasmas physics both interested by our field, musn't have many.

    in addition if he knows drink beers :)

    Yes, I will be at ICCF-22 - probably the best place for us to chat. Looking forward to meeting you in person.

  • What he needs 2 litres for? Even his reactor is much smaller than two litres. On his video he talks about replication with hydrogen - not water.



    At first, such a water should be reused. At second, the process which needs 200 repetitions for to manifest itself has no chance to success anyway. At any case, he already collected 200$, which should be enough for 40 repetitions.

    Your suggestion of reusing the water is really baffling, how could I reuse heavy water that will be used as part of a solution that will be exposed to ultrasound and later submitted to chemical analysis to look for transmutation?


    And the 200 repetitions is for statistical purposes, increasing n is a constant demand from LENR pseudoskeptics, and If I have the possibility to take care of that complaint, it will be taken care of.

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • Hi Matt welcome to the LENR world - my PhD was in Biophysics from UCL and I knew many researchers from Imperial before I retired and have now an active interest in LENR (a background I share with Piantelli who is also a biophysicist). Good to see younger researchers taking an interest especially at a time when Nature has published such a negative report from TG - why can't they read some of the most recent NASA reports (P.Mosier Boss & Forsling most recent J CMNS) actually using co-deposited Pd and D electrolysis to generate neutrons which they then drive a U fission process with? The basis of a fusion fission reactor for space exploration. Then there's all the transmutation data etc too which when you add it all up there can be no doubt that the reactions underlying LENR must be real. I'm particularly interested in Holmlid's ultra dense D/H (UDD/H) work, whether this is analogous to R.Mills Hydrino etc - the real mystery is why there is a background spontaneous level of mesons released from UDD which is enhanced by laser stimulation. Solving this one may be central to all LENR work since the only realistic cold fusion reaction ever clearly characterized is the negative muon catalysed process. All the other theories, e-capture, electron clustering, e-screening, lattice energy, EVO's etc may all play a peripheral role to the one central cold fusion muon catalysed fusion mechanism which I think underlies all LENR. Just need to find the evidence/or disprove the theory as the case may be. :)

  • I'll start with directly addressing your main question of why I need 2L of heavy water (I appreciate that it's a lot). In short, I am making my hydrogen as I need it using this hydrogen generator and it requires a minimum of 1.5L of water to work. The reason I'm using a generator rather than a small lecture bottle filled with gas is for safety reasons - using a generator means I'm never storing any hydrogen in my flat.


    Be sure you do not expose the heavy water to air. It is hygroscopic. It will degrade in purity just from the air in the bottle, and if you leave the top off, that will happen quickly. Bockris and others used IV bags to store it, as I recall.

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    The reason I'm using a generator rather than a small lecture bottle filled with gas is for safety reasons - using a generator means I'm never storing any hydrogen in my flat.

    Deuterium bottles are as unsafe as propane cartridges for camping.

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