The church of SM physics

  • More on these alkali rydberg clusters! I don't see much on that.


    An extended discussion is probably worth a separate thread, but I think its apparent transmutation effect on materials it comes in contact with might be more related to its extreme properties as very low density condensed matter, at least when in highly excited form. While in those experiments a work function of <0.7 eV was measured, from theory it could get down to 0.1 eV or less. The thermionic current density of surfaces with such work function could be enormous even at room temperature, in the order of 1 megaampere/cm2.


    Other strange effects and changes in the affected materials would also likely occur. For example, their tendency to lose electrons could become so high that they might not be able to remain bonded together and may turn into plasma or slowly evaporate at room temperature, or become extremely reactive.


    I don't think all of this would be usually observed however, as after formation alkali Rydberg matter clusters will spontaneously de-excite to energy levels where several of their properties will be much less exaggerated.

  • Like the core of the earth,it would be funny if after all this time it turned out the core is cold but the surface is some miles out being agitated... releasing energy and heat, but that would make us atop a humongous volcano.

  • but that would make us atop a humongous volcano.


    Remake of the 1951 movie.. blew Hawaii.

    in Auckland New Zealand


    If geothermal heat comes from the slow decay of U and Th and K

    it is difficult to explain volcanic outbursts


    .. on the other hand if there is some contribution from H/D fusion as

    magma contacts water then volcanic outbursts are easy to explain..

  • I have been looking at this paper I posted in the news section, that was published as recently as July 2nd 2020, and is open access from the Atoms journal:


    https://www.mdpi.com/2218-2004/8/3/32/htm


    Nature’s Pick-Up Tool, the Stark Effect Induced Gailitis Resonances and Applications


    Abstract


    A simple universal physical mechanism hidden for more than half a century is unexpectedly discovered from a calculation of low excitation antihydrogen. For ease of reference, this mechanism is named Gailitis resonance. We demonstrate, in great detail, that Gailitis resonances are capable of explaining p+7Li low energy nuclear fusion, d-d fusion on a Pd lattice and the initial transient fusion peak in muon catalyzed fusion. Hopefully, these examples will help to identify Gailitis resonances in other systems.


    I was looking for a place to discuss it, and as it is basically about a way to explain the observation of fusion at lower temperatures within the theoretical framework of the SM and QM, I thought this thread could be a good place to discuss it.


    In the acknowledgements section it mentions Peter Hagelstein as being one of the people that helped getting the paper in its final shape by providing a critic review, which struck me as very interesting.

    The paper talks about an already known but not widely studied phenomena called Gailitis resonance as a way to explain the observation of muon catalyzed fusion, but also for D-D fusion within a Pd lattice. It also analyses its implications from the point of view of Rydberg matter.


    Beyond the complexity of the mathematics that is presented, which can only be worked out computationally for the simulations presented, it struck me as odd that they mention that this was probably not found earlier because of the limited capacity of the super computers and the cut off result constraints used in prior research.


    This particular paragraph:


    The Gailitis resonances are supported by a very simple physical phenomenon. Why did it take so long to uncover its true nature? The answer is clearly displayed in Figure 2 and Table 1. The most important region is between y = 296.8 a0 and y = 1306 a0. Any computer would be hard pressed to accommodate such a large calculation correctly as seen even in some most recent calculations. In other words, the long range Coulomb force is producing unexpectedly long range physics. Present computational methods needs substantial improvements.


    makes me think that what is being revealed in this paper Is also an indirect confirmation of the work of Wyttenbach and his view of the limitations of QM and the SM. Perhaps I am totally wrong, but I think this paper is opening a window to the possibility of mainstream accepting what many LENR scientists already have come to terms with.


    I don’t really know, I am just trying to make sense of this paper and what implies for the development of LENR.

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • What I like about the paper in general is that it takes empirical scattering data - which QM is good at - to a new level of precision, in order to come to grips with a new physical model, which QM is clearly abysmal at. It beats conventional QM at its own game to derive something better, that's the goal anyway.

    The "unexpectedly long ranch physics" rings a bell, or is that my imagination :evil:

  • What I like about the paper in general is that it takes empirical scattering data - which QM is good at - to a new level of precision, in order to come to grips with a new physical model, which QM is clearly abysmal at. It beats conventional QM at its own game to derive something better, that's the goal anyway.

    The "unexpectedly long ranch physics" rings a bell, or is that my imagination :evil:

    Good to know I am not the only one that sees the relevance of this.

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • What I like about the paper in general is that it takes empirical scattering data - which QM is good at - to a new level of precision, in order to come to grips with a new physical model, which QM is clearly abysmal at. It beats conventional QM at its own game to derive something better, that's the goal anyway.

    The "unexpectedly long ranch physics" rings a bell, or is that my imagination :evil:

    *long range 😇

  • Anomalous Dirac and Majorana states in condensed matter
    Boris I. Ivlev
    Instituto de F´ısica, Universidad Aut´onoma de San Luis Potos´ı,
    San Luis Potos´ı, 78000 Mexico
    Unexpected electron states, bound to the Coulomb field of the nucleus, are proposed. These
    anomalous states are mediated by positional quantum fluctuations of this nucleus which is a lattice
    site in a solid. Without that support the states look as formal singular solutions which are, at first
    sight, totally useless. The electron binding energy in the MeV range is surprising in condensed
    matter since it usually relates to nuclear processes. Anomalous states are separated from usual
    electron ones in a solid by an energy barrier. The lattice distortions, jointly with the electron
    degrees of freedom, are responsible for the barrier formation. This contrasts to polaron in a solid
    where lattice distortions form a well but not a barrier. Electron transitions to anomalous levels are
    possible under a high energy external perturbation to overcome the barrier. Anomalous state can
    be of the Dirac or Majorana type.

    https://arxiv.org/pdf/2008.05887.pdf


  • "Tunneling through the barrier is impossible since the number exp(−108) does not exist in nature. Therefore there is the only possibility of creation of anomalous states: to excite them over the barrier top

    by some external radiation in the MeV energy range."


    Looks like a correlation with the recent NASA pubication, indicating that an external trigger is required to start fusion/transmutation reactions.

  • indicating that an external trigger is required to start fusion/transmutation reactions.

    the size and nature of the trigger vary according to presumptions on the nature of particle bonds

    in addition the isotope mix and structure of the material will influence the nature/size of the trigger.

    in NASAs publications they are talking about a kinetic trigger of many kevs..


    It may well be that high kinetic energies can trigger a few fusion cascades..


    However in Mizuno's reactors it seems that thermal heating is enough to trigger higher activites.

    it is the preparation of the correct mix of isotopes that allows this heating to be effective.


    As Wyttenbach has stated , laserlight of a few ev appears to have triggered the cracking of protons into kaons pions



    a

  • I still would like to understand the correlations of these effects on 'bare Ultra Dense Hydrogen' and Hydrogen that is located in metal lattices.

    My intuition says that Hydrogen stored in metal lattices also forms local clusters of Ultra Dense Hydrogen within these lattices. I did not yet find any confirmation however.

  • I still would like to understand the correlations of these effects on 'bare Ultra Dense Hydrogen' and Hydrogen that is located in metal lattices.

    My intuition says that Hydrogen stored in metal lattices also forms local clusters of Ultra Dense Hydrogen within theses lattices. I did not yet find any confirmation however.

    I think Takihito Matsumoto proposed the idea of formation of frozen hydrogen within Cold Fusion experiments and had some pictures of it. Bob Greenyer has talked about how Matsumoto went through a lot of ideas until his last’s publications around 2001 where he acknowledged Ken Shoulders as being right all along.


    On the other hand, Santilli, after much attempts to explain his plasma arc fusion observations came out with some new ideas of new kinds of particles being formed under the strong magnetic influence of the arc, and invented the concept of pseudo protons and pseudo nuclei, which if proven to exist would render the Coulomb barrier obsolete, by being “negatively charged”, thus attracted to the nucleus.

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • I still would like to understand the correlations of these effects on 'bare Ultra Dense Hydrogen' and Hydrogen that is located in metal lattices.

    My intuition says that Hydrogen stored in metal lattices also forms local clusters of Ultra Dense Hydrogen within theses lattices. I did not yet find any confirmation however.


    Check out https://www.researchgate.net/p…onfinement_fusion_targets


    and related papers and presentations by G. Miley and M. Prelas et al:

    I have no idea about their current work, however.


  • Thanks can this clarifies a bit.
    These publications mainly speak of concentrations of condensed hydrogen (or UDH/UDD) at the surfact of metals in defected lattice locations. Oxides may play a role in forming UDH/UDD, you mentioned that earlier and is mentioned here in these papers.
    This may be different from NASA's work that seems to apply Deuterium absorption into metal lattices.


    The question therefore is: are there two different fusion mechanisms in these cases?
    Let me call them 'NASA mechanism' and 'Ultra Dense Hydrogen mechanism'.

    The 'NASA mechanism' looks more related to the general term 'LENR', while UDH mechanism is more related to energy generation caused by triggering UDD/UDH (which Holmlid doen not want to relate to LENR). In the case of Mizuno (but also other researchers) both mechanisms may apply, which makes it very complex.

  • Rob Woudenberg

    I haven't read much in detail about NASA's work. On a very quick look it looks as if they're using a gamma ray beam to rapidly unload deuterium from ErD2. In principle it could be similar to the TiD2 shock experiments, which could generated large amounts of neutrons, like the Hora–Miley–Prelas' presentation that I linked above reports.

  • Proton scattering reveals the secrets of strongly-correlated proton-neutron pairs in atomic nuclei


    Author: George Rajna


    The nuclear force that holds protons and neutrons together in the center of atoms has a non-central component—the tensor force, which depends on the spin and relative position of the interacting particles.

    The importance of the tensor force has been observed in the binding energies of light particles, but as of yet their effect on nuclear structure has not been studied in a more direct manner. Previous experiments in the field have demonstrated either the ability to detect the necessary particles, or the resolution required to probe this nuclear force component. However, none have shown both the resolution and the ability to link the observed large momentum transfer of the proton-neutron pairs (or nucleon pair) to nuclear structure.