Randy Davis Patents/Marathon, and New Energy Power Systems

  • External Content youtu.be
    Content embedded from external sources will not be displayed without your consent.
    Through the activation of external content, you agree that personal data may be transferred to third party platforms. We have provided more information on this in our privacy policy.

  • While the critics observed that there were no dead graduate students, and thus no gamma radiation, they may have overlooked well-known science: some neutrons that were produced may have had too much energy (i.e.,>0.1 eV) to produce gammas by being absorbed by hydrogen (H2O) in the calorimeter; and, other neutrons may have been moderated by D2O in the experiment to the extent that they couldn't get to the water in the calorimeter.

  • While the critics observed that there were no dead graduate students, and thus no gamma radiation, they may have overlooked well-known science: some neutrons that were produced may have had too much energy (i.e.,>0.1 eV) to produce gammas by being absorbed by hydrogen (H2O) in the calorimeter; and, other neutrons may have been moderated by D2O in the experiment to the extent that they couldn't get to the water in the calorimeter.

    The “dead graduate student problem” was originally advanced by Robert McCrory after early calculations showed that 4W excess heat was generated by trillions of fusion events per second, releasing one neutron per fusion event, thereby flooding P&F’s Utah lab in lethal radiation.


    (Pons and chemists’ counter argument was that the reaction was not at incredibly high temperatures in fractions of a second like a physicist normally thinks, but rather over two hours within a solid palladium crystal at normal* temperatures).


    *At least collectively if not at some small scale.

  • Good to know. Thanks. ""Bridging the Gaps" indicates that probabilities for each of the reactions involved are not known. Area of work still needed.

    I got myself this book and IMO it is a simple read for newcomers to the field, but with some technical background knowledge needed.


    Bridging the Gaps: An Anthology on Nuclear Cold Fusion https://a.co/d/a0rhpSb


    It also explains quiet detailed the design of a prototyp of around 200kW - the MK12.31 - , what I asume has actually been carried out. However it doesn't contain any info/experience on actual testing.


    It also contains a plan for "advanced development and demonstration"....


    Company details:

    Marathon Systems, Inc. - Fairfax


    Company website: could not find anything. 🤔


    Do we have any news about that?

  • Make sure to drink plenty of cold water.

    Äh? 🤭 British humor?


    I got myself this booklet since it had been advertized here.

    For introductory purpose quiet interesting and compactly written.

    Gives a good overview (of course considering that not all facts are known)

    ...and aspects, we are also aware of like avoiding degrading of "fuel" by transmutation therefore focus on d-d reaction and efficient heat removal...for instance.


    But no news can mean different things...like no success or have to keep silent, but this IMO doesn't make sense, especially when a public opportunity like ICCF is coming up.

  • Modular gaseous electrolysis apparatus with actively-cooled header module, co-disposed heat exchanger module and gas manifold modules therefor

    While reviewing this patent's citations today...

    The Marathon patent is cited by Industrial Heat/Cravens in a patent that has just been granted.

    Sadly, not for a 'reactor'. It is a hydrogen loading method.

    Not sure of any significant value... I am not qualified enough to tell.

    Curious though...

    "Methods for Enhanced Electrolytic Loading of Hydrogen"

    2020-09-08 Application filed by INDUSTRIAL HEAT LLC

    2020-12-24 Publication of US20200399769A1

    2022-03-08 Publication of US11268202B2

    2022-03-08 Application granted

    Status Active

    2039-03-22 Anticipated expiration

    BACKGROUND

    Some electrochemical applications involve the loading of hydrogen or similar species into one or more electrodes. There are three primary competing technologies for the loading of hydrogen into an electrode: “Low High” DC voltage application by Takahashi, the “q wave” method of Brillouin, and the “superwave” forms of Dardik.

    Link

    US11268202B2 - Methods for enhanced electrolytic loading of hydrogen - Google Patents