Covid-19 News

  • The U.S. has committed to sending 80 million doses of vaccines to other countries by the end of June. That's great! I hope that after production ramps up and most of the U.S. population is vaccinated, production will continue at high levels and the vaccines will all be sent to third-world countries.


    https://www.cnn.com/2021/05/17…administration/index.html


    Quote:


    [Biden] noted the US was committing to sharing five times more than any other country had donated in Covid-19 vaccines.

  • been looking around at the old stone housing from long ago and it seems most of it was occupied well after everything was ancient.

    new earth, new buildings, and everything is working when it was new just waiting unoccupied.

  • thinking most are not into all this i don"t post it and without a 100 pages of the private note its pointless anyway.

    but if you understand -

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  • understood, note, a slip up in on the way, a little to high energy if its facing us..

    Maybe some of the experimenters could chime in. I remember Alan Smith mentioning his radiation detector picked up a signal around July last year in the timing of a large CME, cases dropped like a stone for about 5 weeks before the sun became quite active beginning the 3rd week of August. Cases went through the roof for the next two and a half months then we got walloped in mid December and again cases rose even higher. Just my observations but the sun is playing an important part in the pandemic.

  • New vaccine could protect against all coronaviruses, prevent future pandemics


    https://www.wral.com/coronavir…ics/19682726/?version=amp


    Duke researchers have created a vaccine with the potential to protect against all forms of coronavirus that move from animals to humans, now and in the future.


    On Monday morning, Duke experts held a briefing to discuss the vaccine, which they believe could prevent future pandemics.


    The vaccine works by attacking a genetic sequence common to all forms of coronavirus that enables them to bind to human cells. The new vaccine has been 100% effective in non-human tests

    Last week Dr. Anthony Fauci called the new research ‘potentially exciting’ and an important proof of concept.


    On Monday, Duke immunologists discussed their research and its implications during a video conference call.


    The vaccine works by taking a small part of the virus – the part that actually attaches to cells – and presents multiple copies to the immune system.


    “That allows the immune system to focus a response against that part of the virus, preventing the virus from being able to attach to cells and hopefully prevent subsequent infection," said Dr. Kevin Saunders, an associate professor of surgery at Duke and director of research at the Vaccine Institute.

    The vaccine will bind not only to SARS-CoV-2, but also coronaviruses that circulate in animals, according to Saunders.


    One reason this vaccine has been able to be created so quickly is due to 20 years of work in developing an HIV vaccine, according to Dr. Barton Haynes, a professor of medicine and immunology at the Duke School of Medicine and director of the Duke Human Vaccine Institute.


    “We published a paper ... on a breakthrough in HIV vaccine development," said Haynes, who said it uses the same kind of technology and vaccine designs that could be used for coronavirus.

    We knew that the SARS-CoV-2 virus is an RNA virus. It’s the same kind of genetic material that the HIV virus uses," said Haynes.


    "The HIV virus is one of the most rapidly evolving life forms that we know – because RNA viruses tend to make mistakes as they replicate. And we knew the SARS-CoV-2 would also create mutants that would escape our immune system as the immune system made antibodies against it," he said.


    The new vaccine technology helps prevent replication of the virus in the nose, as well as in the lungs.

    Haynes believes now is the time to plan for the next coronavirus pandemic or outbreak – because we’ve had two major outbreaks before COVID-19, all in the past two decades.


    "One in 2003, the SARS outbreak, and one in 2011, the MERS outbreak," he said.


    He expects there will certainly be others.


    "So now is the time to provide vaccines that will prepare for those, so we can now control outbreaks and prevent them from becoming pandemics in the future.”

  • Maybe some of the experimenters could chime in. I remember Alan Smith mentioning his radiation detector picked up a signal around July last year in the timing of a large CME, cases dropped like a stone for about 5 weeks before the sun became quite active beginning the 3rd week of August. Cases went through the roof for the next two and a half months then we got walloped in mid December and again cases rose even higher. Just my observations but the sun is playing an important part in the pandemic.

    its already set up, the month of may is the test area,

  • New vaccine could protect against all coronaviruses, prevent future pandemics


    https://www.wral.com/coronavir…ics/19682726/?version=amp


    Duke researchers have created a vaccine with the potential to protect against all forms of coronavirus that move from animals to humans, now and in the future.

    That would be wonderful! There were reports about an effort to make a pan-coronavirus vaccine before COVID-19. I think it was the same concept. It would prevent the common cold as well.

  • Push for patent waivers is 'political theater' and won't solve vaccine shortage, CEO says


    https://www.cnbc.com/amp/2021/…ine-supply-shortages.html


    Waiving intellectual property protections for Covid-19 vaccines will not help to address the global supply shortage, the co-founder of a Massachusetts-based biopharmaceutical company told CNBC.


    The push for patent waivers is "political theater" and does not inherently allow others to create safe and effective vaccines, which are already very difficult to make, said Jake Becraft, CEO and co-founder of Strand Therapeutics.

    His company does not produce any Covid-19 vaccines but is developing a platform to create programmable messenger RNA drugs, which can trigger the body's own immune response to fight illnesses.


    "We need to commit to what we're already manufacturing and scale that up across the world as much as we can," Becraft said Monday on CNBC's "Squawk Box Asia."


    Vaccine shortage

    A global shortage of Covid-19 vaccines has left some countries scrambling for supplies to roll out their inoculation programs. In fact, India — the world's largest vaccine producer — is also facing a domestic shortage in the middle of a devastating second wave.


    Health experts, rights groups and international medical charities have argued there is a critical need to waive IP rights to address the global vaccine shortage and avoid prolonging the health crisis. It comes as many countries are getting hit, especially in Asia, are struggling with new waves of infections due to mutated Covid variants.


    But, vaccine makers argue that such a move could disrupt the flow of raw materials and may lead to lower investments on health research from smaller biotech innovators.

    Last year, India and South Africa submitted a joint proposal to the World Trade Organization to waive IP rights on Covid vaccines.


    Known as the Trips waiver — or Trade Related Intellectual Property Rights — the plan was blocked by some high-income countries including the U.K., Switzerland, Japan, Norway, Canada, and the European Union among others. France, for example, reasoned that the way to step up global inoculation is for vaccine-producing nations to step up their exports.


    While the United States initially blocked the proposal, the Biden administration this month said it supports waivers on IP rights for Covid-19.


    Boosting the supply chain

    Becraft said that the vaccines need to be made in very controlled, high-tech facilities and that the required technology does not exist across the globe. That means that even with a patent waiver, some countries will not have the know-how to produce their own vaccines.


    Instead, Becraft proposed that pharmaceutical companies like Moderna, Pfizer and BioNTech should instead be provided with incentives to transfer the technology to manufacturing sites around the world.


    "If we want vaccines that are safe and effective, we need to incentivize these companies to actually build out manufacturing capacity globally," he said.


    "We need to go to Moderna, we need to go to BioNTech, and say: 'What will it take for you to transfer your technology to these developing world countries?'" Becraft said.


    Unless vaccines are globally accessible to everyone, there will always be a risk of a Covid variant that makes vaccines ineffective, he added. "All of our progress to this point will be for nothing."

    Nisha Biswal, president of the U.S.-India Business Council agreed that a patent waiver won't address the question of boosting vaccine supplies to the rest of the world.


    With a patent waiver, it would take months or years before the technology, raw materials, and production capacity is up to the standard required for countries to be able to produce their own vaccines, she told CNBC's "Squawk Box Asia" on Monday.


    Instead, the focus should be on helping countries that are already producing vaccines to scale up their production.


    "Many of these (vaccine) manufactures are already in conversation with India, with Indian companies, on how they can try to have manufacturing in India of some of these," Biswal said. "That's probably a faster, and more efficient way to do it than to talk about a Trips waiver."


    Becraft from Strand Therapeutics added that in the longer-term, world governments need to provide more funding and infrastructure support for pharmaceutical companies to build manufacturing sites around the world.


    Last week BioNTech announced it would build a manufacturing facility in Singapore to produce its mRNA-based vaccines.

  • MIT Study: SARS-CoV-2 Integrates into the Human Genome


    https://www.laboratoryequipmen…es-into-the-Human-Genome/


    In the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare workers analyzing test results began noticing something strange: patients who had already recovered from COVID-19 would sometimes inexplicably test positive on a PCR test weeks or even months later.


    Although people can catch COVID-19 for a second time, this did not appear to be the case for these patients; no live viruses were isolated from their samples, and some studies found these false positive results even while holding participants in quarantine. Also, RNAs generally have a short life—most only stick around for a few minutes—so it was unlikely for positive tests to be the result of residual RNAs.


    Now, a new paper from the lab of Whitehead Institute Member and MIT professor of biology Rudolf Jaenisch may offer an answer to why some patients continue to test positive after recovery from COVID-19. In the paper, published online in PNAS, Jaenisch and collaborators show that genetic sequences from the RNA virus SARS-CoV-2 can integrate into the genome of the host cell through a process called reverse transcription. These sections of the genome can then be “read” into RNAs, which could potentially be picked up by a PCR test.


    SARS-CoV-2 is not the only virus that integrates into the human genome. Around 8 percent of our DNA consists of the remnants of ancient viruses. Some viruses, called retroviruses, rely on integration into human DNA in order to replicate themselves.


    “SARS-CoV-2 is not a retrovirus, which means it doesn't need reverse transcription for its replication,” says Whitehead Institute postdoc and first author Liguo Zhang. “However, non-retroviral RNA virus sequences have been detected in the genomes of many vertebrate species, including humans.”


    With this in mind, Zhang and Jaenisch began to design experiments to test whether this viral integration could be happening with the novel coronavirus. With the help of Jaenisch lab postdoc Alexsia Richards, the researchers infected human cells with coronavirus in the lab and then sequenced the DNA from infected cells two days later to see whether it contained traces of the virus’ genetic material.


    To ensure that their results could be confirmed with different methodology, they used three different DNA sequencing techniques. In all samples, they found fragments of viral genetic material (though the researchers emphasize that none of the inserted fragments was enough to recreate a live virus).


    Zhang, Jaenisch and colleagues then examined the DNA flanking the small viral sequences for clues to the mechanism by which they got there. In these surrounding sequences, the researchers found the hallmark of a genetic feature called a retrotransposon.


    Sometimes called “jumping genes,” transposons are sections of DNA that can move from one region of the genome to another. They are often activated to “jump” in conditions of high stress or during cancer or aging, and are powerful agents of genetic change.


    One common transposon in the human genome is called the LINE1 retrotransposon, which is made up of a powerhouse combination of DNA-cutting machinery and reverse transcriptase, an enzyme that creates DNA molecules from an RNA template (like the RNA of SARS-CoV-2).


    “There’s a very clear footprint for LINE1 integration,” Jaenisch says. “At the junction of the viral sequence to the cellular DNA, it makes a 20 base pair duplication.”


    Besides the duplication, another feature as evidence for LINE1-mediated integration is a LINE1 endonuclease recognition sequence. The researchers identified these features in nearly 70 percent of the DNAs that contained viral sequences, but not all, suggesting that the viral RNA may be integrating into cellular DNA via multiple mechanisms.


    To screen for viral integration outside of the lab, the researchers analyzed published datasets of RNA transcripts from different types of samples, including COVID-19 patient samples. With these datasets, Zhang and Jaenisch were able to calculate the fraction of genes that were transcribed in these patients’ cells which contained viral sequences that could be derived from integrated viral copies. The percentage varied from sample to sample, but for some, a relatively large fraction of viral transcripts seem to have been transcribed from viral genetic material integrated into the genome.


    A previous draft of the paper with this finding was published online on the preprint server bioRxiv. However, recent research revealed that at least some of the viral-cellular reads could be the product of misleading artefacts of the RNA sequencing method. In the present paper, the researchers were able to eliminate these artefacts that could have been obscuring the results.


    Instead of simply tallying transcripts that contained viral material, the researchers looked at which direction the transcripts had been read. If the viral reads were the result of live viruses or existing viral RNAs in the cell, the researchers would expect that most of the viral transcripts would have been read in the correct orientation for the sequences in question; in acutely infected cells in culture, more than 99 percent are in the correct orientation. If the transcripts were the product of random viral integration into the genome, however, there would be a near 50-50 split—half the transcripts would have been read forwards, the other half backwards, relative to the host genes.


    “This is what we saw in some patient samples,” says Zhang. “It suggests that much of the viral RNA in some samples could be transcribed from integrated sequences.”


    Because the dataset they used was quite small, Jaenisch emphasizes that more information is needed to establish exactly how common this phenomenon is in real life and what it might mean for human health.


    It is possible that only a very few human cells experience any kind of viral integration at all. In the case of another RNA virus that integrates into the host cell genome, only a fraction of a percent of infected cells (between .001 and .01) contained integrated viral DNA. For SARS-CoV-2, the frequency of integration in humans is still unknown.


    “The fraction of cells which have the integrating with could be very small,” says Jaenisch. “But even if it's rare, there are more than 140 million people who have been infected already, right?”


    In the future, Jaenisch and Zhang plan to investigate whether the fragments of SARS-CoV-2 genetic material could be made into proteins by the cell.


    “If they do, and trigger immune responses, it may provide continuous protection against the virus,” Zhang says.


    They also hope to investigate whether these integrated sections of DNA could be partly to blame for some of the long-term autoimmune consequences that some COVID-19 patients experience.


    “At this point, we can only speculate,” says Jaenisch. “But one thing we do think we can explain is why some patients are long-term PCR positive.”


    Republished courtesy of MIT. Photo: An image of lung cancer cells infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Blue represents DNA, green shows the SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein, and red represents double-stranded RNA, which occurs when the virus replicates its genome. A new study from the Jaenisch lab suggests that some virus RNA can be reverse transcribed and inserted into the human genome, which may explain why some patients continue to test positive for COVID-19 even after recovery. Credit: Alexsia Richards/Whitehead Institute

  • Two darkhorse Bio PHD's discuss the lableak hypothesis.... ivermectin....... zombie cicadas..


    TM 1.19.37

    Bret conducts dangerous experiment by taking non FDA approved drug..



    "In this episode, we once again discuss the “lab leak” hypothesis for the origins of SARS-CoV2,

    as this week a letter published in Science has helped it gain yet more credibility in mainstream scientific circles."

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  • We knew that the SARS-CoV-2 virus is an RNA virus. It’s the same kind of genetic material that the HIV virus uses," said Haynes.

    This is no surprise as in the Wuhan lab some AIDS virus spike genes have been inserted...

    Push for patent waivers is 'political theater' and won't solve vaccine shortage, CEO says

    I said the. But the tactics here is from FM playbook page 2. Attack them by attacking your own strength as it is also their strength. This is just done to divert the discussion away from the real solution:


    During a pandemic vaccines must be provided without any profit taking!


    In the future, Jaenisch and Zhang plan to investigate whether the fragments of SARS-CoV-2 genetic material could be made into proteins by the cell.

    Far more urgent is to look at what all the 30..50% crap RNA of the Pfizer vaccines can induce after injection.


    I urge people to stay away from the Pfizer vaccine!

    Yet another victim of the "not-related-to" disease


    https://www.newindianexpress.c…ion-hospital-2290710.html


    Of course it's a pure cardiac issue... Of course caused by a vaccine reaction. Just one of the > 1000 cardiac vaccine victims so far. Do you really believe that US hospitals will ever report such events as vaccine events, when not even third world hospitals do so?

    OR lets name the facts: Big hospitals are always run by R/FM/J.... At least here in Switzerland, USA, Germany ,.....

  • Lots of good news. Worldwide cases have fallen from the peak of 828,000 down to 666,000. Cases are falling in the U.S. and France. In several countries I have checked, cases are falling in direct proportion to the percent of population vaccinated.


    https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/


    Vaccination rates:


    https://ourworldindata.org/covid-vaccinations



    The UK continues to do very well:


    https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/country/uk/


    They are loosening up social restrictions:


    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/0…own-uk-india-variant.html

    "Lockdown Eased in England, for Now, at Least

    Britons savor their first real taste of freedom in months, but the emergence of a new coronavirus variant threatens to reverse the progress."


    Canada is catching up to U.S. in vaccinations, and cases are starting to fall rapidly:


    https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/country/canada/



    In Japan, unfortunately, things are still not going well. They are still behind the rest of the developed world in vaccinations. They announced more "soft" lockdowns in prefectures most affected by the pandemic, shown in purple here:


    https://covid19japan.com/

  • In several countries I have checked, cases are falling in direct proportion to the percent of population vaccinated.

    In Portugal, Slovakia, Zaire cases (did) fall much faster due to Ivermectin.


    We also see (Israel, UK) that just the vaccination of the older > 45 and people at risk is enough to bring down the epidemic.

    about 97% of all death are older that 65 also at least 97% of all death had a known risk factor.


    Further among people younger than 35 we see no risk at all. Flu is at least 10x deadlier for them! Also bathroom soap..