Independent Hydrino Replication

  • Could the excess enthalpy be simply accounted for by the existence of other chemical/phase change reactions not considered in the calculations, particularly important for crystalline compounds releasing energy on heat degradation to amorphous phases? None of these reactions are all that simple, and further wouldn't hydrino energy be released from all hydroxyl-based reactions - making such reactions forming precipitates etc potentially explosive? Which has not been observed.:)


    Mills has known for a long time that too much water quenches hydrino formation. One wants only a small amount of nascent water that hasn't had the opportunity to form van der Waals bonds with other water molecules, so it's at the correct energy to act as a catalyst. So when one looks at his experiments where he feeds in rarified H2 and O2 gases it's in a ballpark ratio of about 50 to 1. Thus little water is formed, and there is relatively lots of H to undergo hydrino reaction. But this is not the case with the mentioned hydroxyl reactions, which generate lots of water which will put a large damper on hydrino formation. Also, hydrino reaction is usually self limiting because of space charge buildup from ionized catalyst. This is why his SunCell utilizes large electrical current - to wipe up that space charge. That's my understanding anyway.

  • Mills has known for a long time that too much water quenches hydrino formation. One wants only a small amount of nascent water that hasn't had the opportunity to form van der Waals bonds with other water molecules, so it's at the correct energy to act as a catalyst. So when one looks at his experiments where he feeds in rarified H2 and O2 gases it's in a ballpark ratio of about 50 to 1. Thus little water is formed, and there is relatively lots of H to undergo hydrino reaction. But this is not the case with the mentioned hydroxyl reactions, which generate lots of water which will put a large damper on hydrino formation. Also, hydrino reaction is usually self limiting because of space charge buildup from ionized catalyst. This is why his SunCell utilizes large electrical current - to wipe up that space charge. That's my understanding anyway.

    Or this awesome analysis. Did not consider these variables. Lines up more with the particulars of the Millsian theory.

  • What are the Millsian solutions to the reactants?


    They're in the paper Dave linked to originally: this paper

    This would have been from the CIHT cell days, which predated the SunCell technology. But, it was after Mills realized, by calculation of the energy of the water molecule, that water itself could be a catalyst for hydrino formation.

    The CIHT cells produced electricity directly, and there should still be validation reports and pictures of the stacked cell apparatus on the website.

  • They're in the paper Dave linked to originally: this paper

    This would have been from the CIHT cell days, which predated the SunCell technology. But, it was after Mills realized, by calculation of the energy of the water molecule, that water itself could be a catalyst for hydrino formation.

    The CIHT cells produced electricity directly, and there should still be validation reports and pictures of the stacked cell apparatus on the website.

    I wonder if those cells could be improved on with current knowledge. How much more dense were they than state of the art 2020 conventional fuel cells/batteries?

  • I wonder if those cells could be improved on with current knowledge. How much more dense were they than state of the art 2020 conventional fuel cells/batteries?

    I tend to doubt that the CIHT cells could be improved significantly. I think that something like four years of tweaking was done. It improved over that time, but ultimately it was still greatly lacking in both energy and power density, much lower than conventional fuel cells or batteries. I recall one of the validators doing a calculation showing that the hydrino reaction rate had to have been very low, despite the quantity of potential reactants. Something was holding it back. Fast forward to today: The SunCell has awesome reaction rate and power density and energy density, but it's got other problems such as longevity. Perhaps they can achieve some kind of happy middle ground by dialing back on the power and increasing the runtime.

  • You make a good point, and I am seeing the practical advantage of FeOOH in simplifying the experiment - eliminates sources of error like poor mixing of two compounds. I have a couple labs engaged in quoting. Maybe I will incorporate this feedback in my next round.