Frank Gordon's "Lattice Energy Converter (LEC)"...replicators workshop

  • I am of the opinion that plating (as we know it) is not even necessary- using a carbon rod anode suggest that is the case. Hydrogenation of hydrogen-loving materials like lanthanide group elements is however very important.


    I can also confirm that sleepy working electrodes can be 'woken up' by re-electrolysing them

    The Dennis Cravens Golden Ball demo is very close to this LEC experimentation.


    To refresh our memories, this thread discusses that demo



    Dennis Cravens always added rare earths into the mix of elements used in his experiments. The reason I beleive this idea works is because of the recent discovery that a stable Higgs mode is a characteristic of anisotropic quantum magnets.


    Cravens used SmCo5 as the active increment in his golden ball experiment.


    One way or another, if a rare earth magnet is formed in the LEC, good results might result.


    Here is some wisdom from Russ George about this subject


    In another experiment you may not have heard of - from Bockris and Sundaresan in 1994 - it was shown that magnetic stimulation boosted excess heat substantially in a Pd-D electrolysis cell. This line of work leads up to the Letts-Cravens effect – wrt understanding the influence of a magnetic field on LENR.


    “After the cathode had been charged with deuterium for 48 hours at a current of 80 mA, the cell was placed in the field of a permanent magnet of 200 Gauss strength. The cell electrolyte temperature rose to 5°C above ambient after 230 seconds. After 576 seconds, the magnet was replaced by two Neodymium magnets with a 800 Gauss field. The temperature immediately started increasing and reached 13.5 °C above ambient in about 15 minutes and remained constant. The temperature returned when the magnet was removed… [end of Bockris quote]


    The $64 question - why isn’t a magnetic field fully employed in the glow-stick experiments? By “fully employed” it is meant that: yes, the heater wire does provide a minimal field but increasing the field strength by an order of magnitude could be beneficial.


    … relevant comment: those who do not remember the past cannot benefit from its insight- paraphrase of famous Santayana quote, which is the logic behind the LENR-CANR library.


    Russ also states as follows:


    Most of what the anonymously posted notions of 'Axil' are indeed not new. Martin Fleischmann, Kiril Chukanov, and I had a spirited conversation about very similar ideas more than 20 years ago while examining Kiril's working device as it was making prodigious 'anomalous heat.' There was no denying the heat or the measurement of it at hand. SmCo5 loads hydrogen at a ratio of 5:1 by the way, far above Pd's 1:1. If you want nano-fractures in metals I defy anyone to make more such nano-features than what occur in SmCo5 that is hydrogen loaded and deloaded repeatedly. The 5x hydrogen loading shatters the lattices causing hydrogen embrittlement to such a degree that after many such cycles one can crush the metal to nano-dust with your fingertips! What Kiril, myself, Martin and others were missing at the time was the very high intentional temperature zone that Rossi's work has engendered! Not to say that we were not familiar with dramatic effects at such high temperatures as Fleischmann's Singularity and my cavitation sono-fusion metal volcanoes clearly proved. http://atom-ecology.russgeorge.net/

  • Hi all!

    Yesterday I ran a couple of experiments with the LEC. The results are somewhat preliminary (they should be repeated before taking them for granted), nevertheless they are quite interesting.

    I activated a WE with my usual technique and tested its activity measuring the open circuit voltage. It was not so good as other times, but it still generated about 150 mV (about the half of my best devices). Moreover it showed an extremely fast tendency to oxidize, so its activity decreased rapidly (timescale of few hours). Even though I managed to carry out the planned experiments:


    1) I imaged the WE in open air with a FLIR camera sensitive to mid IR (around 4-16 um), in order to detect any potential hotspot. The net result was that no hotspot or increased temperature were found. On the contrary, the active zone appeared cooler than surrounding environment. There may be a couple of conventional explanation to this: the active zone probably had residual humidity trapped, so the evaporation caused a slight decrease in temperature, or the emissivity of the plated zone was different than control zones (for example the hotter appearance of the non-active zone on the left is due to emissivity issues). So I don't think there is nothing really interesting, until this coolness is confirmed to be something "anomalous". Other thing to note: the camera resolution appeared a bit too low to observe very small hotspots (if any). These are a couple of shots from the WE before and after the activation (the background had a controlled emissivity close to 1):




    2) I noticed (and this was not the first time actually) that the voltage measured on the LEC featured some small abrupt variations from time to time, so I decided to connect it to an audio interface to the PC, to record the signal at 44.1 kHz (22 kHz bandwidth). The audio interface was a good choice allowing to record for extensive time with an adequate frequency and amplitude resolution. The "pops" were clearly visible on the recording (timescale is seconds, amplitude is linear "mic" level, digitally amplified):



    Also this result has to be confirmed, but it may be very interesting: these "pops" are very short in time (few ms) and sometimes happen in bursts. Apparently they have the characteristics of small "explosions". If this is true, this may be the way the ionization is generated: discrete energetic events that ejects "something" (accelerated particles o radiations) in the gas. Experimental notes: as a control, I connected a dummy LEC to the same audio input, in order to establish if this signal were noise/interference from outside. The dummy LEC didn't show these features. Interestingly enough, the use of an audio interface, with high impedance and very high sensitivity allowed to observe something that it is difficult to capture with an oscilloscope (thing that I've tried in the past, without meaningful results).


    Another interesting observation: while the LEC output was spontaneously decaying due to oxidation, I observed some polarity reversal when changing the attached load or instrumentation. This imply that the work function difference is not the only source of voltage, there is probably some additional diffusion or space charge phenomena that can be temporarily reversed depending on the initial conditions.


    Next experiment will be applying a PWM modulation to the plating current (same average current density as usual, but much higher peak current). Stay tuned! ;)

  • Very interesting preliminary observations Stevenson ! I really appreciate you always take the precaution of doing a control run. I can’t stress how important is this because it makes your data truly valuable. Did you take a screenshot of the recording of the control not making any “pops”? I know a flat line is not really remarkable but I just ask because it helps visualize things. I really think that if the “LEC pops” are confirmed, provides a really interesting clue of what is going on.

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • Also this result has to be confirmed, but it may be very interesting: these "pops" are very short in time (few ms) and sometimes happen in bursts. Apparently they have the characteristics of small "explosions". If this is true, this may be the way the ionization is generated: discrete energetic events that ejects "something" (accelerated particles o radiations) in the gas. Experimental notes: as a control, I connected a dummy LEC to the same audio input, in order to establish if this signal were noise/interference from outside. The dummy LEC didn't show these features. Interestingly enough, the use of an audio interface, with high impedance and very high sensitivity allowed to observe something that it is difficult to capture with an oscilloscope (thing that I've tried in the past, without meaningful results).

    That is a great piece of work. Interesting that it was too fast for your scope because long ago the late Ken Shoulders was battling with a similar problem when looking for signals from EVO strikes on an electrode. He (being very skilled in that stuff) built his own very fast scope.


    I'm not surprised that your FLIR shots showed nothing - but that might be a matter of sensitivity only. My guess is that UV detection might show something though.

  • This is an important result which confirms what had been observed by Russian teams with Fleischman-Pons electrodes, and by other researchers since:



    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/270817889_Hypothese_de_la_Diafluidite_with_English_translation



    “the heat energy finally transmitted to the palladium would have produced a sudden dilatation which can be detected by sensitive microphones as faints clicks”./.



  • Perhaps invented at...

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Instruments, Sensors, and Electronics | Innovation and Partnerships Office

    A trio of LLNL scientists have been inducted into the laboratory's Entrepreneur's Hall of Fame. Each developed technologies during or after their Lab careers ...


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  • Did you take a screenshot of the recording of the control not making any “pops”?

    I saved the audio files, so I can produce the screenshot or even send you the data... :) (the raw data is not as clean as the one I shown: there is a considerable amount of 50 Hz + harmonics superimposed)


    Interesting that it was too fast for your scope because long ago the late Ken Shoulders was battling with a similar problem when looking for signals from EVO strikes on an electrode. He (being very skilled in that stuff) built his own very fast scope.

    The problem with the scope is not the bandwidth, but the signal amplitude: even very good scopes have a maximum amplification of 10-20 mV/div and a 8 bit resolution, so it is very difficult to see (and even more to trigger) a signal that is less than 1 mV. Probably an audio front-end + a scope would do it, but the problem with the trigger and the memory length will be still there.


    I'm not surprised that your FLIR shots showed nothing - but that might be a matter of sensitivity only. My guess is that UV detection might show something though.

    The thermal camera has a very good temperature resolution, that is also self-adjusted depending on the scene you look at. You can reliably see fraction of a degree (this can hardly be done with thermocouples or PT100s). My problem was instead with the spatial resolution. i.e. the number of pixels and their dimensions.

    With reference to the UV, I tried to detect them via fluorescent plastics, but I found no observable emission...


    “the heat energy finally transmitted to the palladium would have produced a sudden dilatation which can be detected by sensitive microphones as faints clicks”./.

    Yes, I think the phenomenon could be the same, and I think that by using a piezoelectric transducer attached to the WE it would be possible to record these "clicks" (in my case I only recorded the effect on the voltage).

    I want to add a related thing I noticed: vibration seem to stimulate the effect. Gently knocking the external part of the WE produced an increase in the voltage (however this could be related to the voltage generation mechanism, i.e. the charge separation inside the device more than the primary effect).

    Has anyone measured terahertz radiation emanating from an LEC device?

    Terahertz measurements are a nightmare per se! Even when you know what you are measuring... ^^

  • As we’ve come to expect, James Stevenson’s experimental approach and the results are impressive. We have wanted to conduct similar tests on the LEC but no longer have access to an IR camera with the right wavelength.


    Shortly before I retired, I gave a presentation at the University of Missouri in 2009 which is a little over an hour long. It summarizes the experimental results from 20 years’ worth of research at the SPAWAR Navy Research and Development Center as well as some results from Mel Miles and Mitchell Swartz. I’ve attached a link to that presentation. Note that these experiments were ‘conventional’ LENR experiments conducted with a liquid electrolyte. You can watch the whole presentation, or you can skip to about 9 minutes, 30 seconds into the presentation where I show a short video of hot spots that we recorded using a borrowed IR camera. Following the hot spot video, there are a few slides showing pressure and temperature spikes that were obtained by codepositing Pd onto a ferroelectric transducer which will record both pressure and transient temperature.


    Twenty-Year History of Lattice-Enabled Nuclear Reactions (LENR) - Hiding in Plain Sight
    UPDATE April 23, 2018: NASA: “For Development and Testing of a High Power Space Generator”The first link is an “Umbrella Agreement”: https://www.nasa.gov/saa...
    youtu.be


    I have a video of hot spots that is longer than the one in the presentation but it is 18 MB and I’m not sure that I can attach it to a LENR Forum post. If there’s interest, I’ll try to transfer it to a web link that can be posted.


    I’ve also attached two files related to a presentation and paper on Hot Spots and Mini Explosions.