Ultra-dense hydrogen and Rydberg matter—a more informal general discussion thread

  • Looks nice, but I don't think it's good for observing the signal interpreted as due to muons in Holmlid-type experiments, or at least not directly.


    It's also likely to be sensitive to strong EMI, which will probably make it detect noise that could be misinterpreted as a real radiation signal. Such noise may even "look" light a real radiation spectrum, not necessarily be chaotic like the word suggests.


    The website says it has a silicon photomultiplier detector (SiPM) which like other semiconductor detectors used at room temperature will probably have too much thermal noise to detect the small "spontaneous signal" (dark count rate in the order of 0.1-1.0 MHz per mm2 of sensor at room temperature—source here).

  • I wonder if high-density charge storage devices like DRAM could be somehow used for detection under certain operating conditions.


    Cosmic ray-induced effects (muons, neutrons, etc) have been known since a long time to be able to cause "bit flips" in computer memory. These usually go unnoticed both because not many natural cosmic ray events per unit of time generally occur, and (in consumer-grade computer devices) because memory data integrity is usually not actively checked for. But what if an intense muon source is available nearby?


    - Cosmic ray muon causes glitch in electronic devices - ResOU (osaka-u.ac.jp)

    - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmic_ray#Effect_on_electronics

    - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single-event_upset

    - https://www.sciencealert.com/r…avoc-with-our-smartphones


    Since that aim is detection and not prevention, such detector would need to use non-ECC memory, unlike servers and other mission-critical environments, and the memory possibly be tuned as to hold data with somewhat less stability than usual. Then the entire memory contents would be filled with known data and continuously analyzed for new errors ("bit flips") with a simple memory testing application.

  • I wonder if high-density charge storage devices like DRAM could be somehow used for detection under certain operating conditions.


    Such a scheme has been patented, at least for cosmic rays. See the following reference. I have not investigated the details, so its applicability would need to be investigated further


    Patent application title: ON-DIE ELECTRIC COSMIC RAY DETECTOR

    IPC8 Class: AG01T124FI
    USPC Class: 250394
    Class name: Radiant energy invisible radiant energy responsive electric signaling plural signaling means
    Publication date: 2015-12-10
    Patent application number: 20150355343

  • This is the problem we are all facing, having to think ahead and patent everything 'just in case it works!!! Most of LENR so called FACTS have been patented for so long (at least since F&P in 1989)so everything is already in the Public Domain. So really we can all just relax, correspond freely on our LENR website, knowing that everything here has been patented already. NOW IS THE TIME TO REVEAL A WORKING PROTOTYPE! :) :) :)

  • can

    It's also likely to be sensitive to strong EMI, which will probably make it detect noise that could be misinterpreted as a real radiation signal.

    According to Wiki : The signal parameters are practically independent of external magnetic fields, in contrast to vacuum PMTs


    Thermal noise can be reduced by applying e.g. a peltier cooler according to the reference you provided. I am not sure this will be sufficient for reliably detecting specifically negative muons though.


    Silicon photomultipliers can be part of LIDAR detectors which are e.g. targeted for autonome car driving. Even current iPhones have LIDAR sensors to improve photography performance. There is probably quite some R&D performed therefore to improve the performance of SiPMs.

  • jeff

    It was to be expected that cosmic ray detection at the hardware level was already invented, but I was more wondering about the possibility of detection via software using commonly available devices.


    This patent seems more concerned more with CPU logic circuitry rather than memory. Apparently, memory is more susceptible to random bit flips than CPU logic:


    If cosmic rays cause bit flips in memory, like RAM, enough so that parity or ECC may be necessary, then does it happen in the combination...
    Answer: Combinational logic operates on a time-continuous basis and is ignorant of any clock interval. Cosmic rays impact memory because those are charge…
    www.quora.com


    Rob Woudenberg

    Static magnetic fields deflect electrons away from their intended path in the dynode chain inside vacuum PMTs and usually decrease the signal, but I was referring to changing fields/electromagnetic interference, to which sensitive electronic devices are often susceptible.


    Regarding vacuum PMTs, a source is chapter 13.3 "Effect of External Magnetic Fields" here: https://www.hamamatsu.com/reso…etd/PMT_handbook_v3aE.pdf