French/CleanHME LENR success with nanopowders (video). Filmed and produced by Ruby Carat.

  • Ruby went to France this past March for the purpose of investigating LENR progress in France. She did spend many days with Jacques Ruer, Mathieu Valat, Christophe Le Roux, Robert Michel and Jean-Paul Biberian, and was able to produce this quality video showing their progress using nanopowders:


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  • Ruby went to France this past March for the purpose of investigating LENR progress in France. She did spend many days with Jacques Ruer, Mathieu Valat, Christophe Le Roux, Robert Michel and Jean-Paul Biberian, and was able to produce this quality video showing their progress using nanopowders:


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    I watched this one and was really happy to see that they have achieved high reproducibilty of excess heat, made me eant to know much more about the results!!! This is like the European version of the Japanese NEDO collaboration program.

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • I would remind you also of Jean-Paul Biberian's presentation on this at ICCF-25


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    This is linked to this paper which is possibly where this research started - .. not by Jean-Paul or the Vegatec crew he is working with now- but it is about the chemistry, catalytic behaviour and performance of the 'hydrotalcite' group for making good catalysts, These chemicals (or similar) are what J-P is synthesising and using.


    https://www.sciencedirect.com/…Al,2%20at%20900%20%C2%B0C

  • By the way, beside the enthusiasming content, congratulation to Ruby for the quality of the video... looks like a classic corporate video (it's a compliment).


    The reason why this powder is interesting is well explained, as the challenge to scale up power...


    Are there some results in Belgium, Sweden, Italy , already ?

    “Only puny secrets need keeping. The biggest secrets are kept by public incredulity.” (Marshall McLuhan)
    twitter @alain_co

  • This is an excellent video! Both the content and the production are very good.


    Some notes on the content:


    The reaction does not occur below ~800°C. That is good. It is in line with Ed's results. I think it indicates this is a real reaction and not a calorimeter artifact. I doubt that an artifact would start working at a high, predictable temperature.


    Load/deload increases heat. Again, this is in line with other people's observations, and it does not seem like an artifact.


    Effect is proportional to mass. Good.


    10 W with 20 g of material. 10 W should be easy to detect with confidence with an ordinary calorimeter. Perhaps Jean-Paul can tell us what the precision of the calorimeter is. Jean-Paul says they need more heat to make practical devices. I think 10 W could be used for thousands of lucrative, important applications in small machines such as cell phones.


    Non-sintering powder. This is a big plus! Sintering has been a problem since Arata pioneered the nanopowder approach.


    The laboratories and equipment are impressive.


    Jean-Paul says scaling up is "not so easy." I say: don't even try to scale. That is not your job. Distribute material and instructions to 1 or 2 corporations or universities that agree to publish their results. If they replicate, you will soon have hundreds of corporations frantically working on this, spending $10 million per day. Collectively, they will make more progress every day than you could make in a lifetime.


    Notes on the video production values:


    Good job Ruby!


    Good quality video and audio are important. Lighting and focus are important. People will not watch a poor quality video, where you cannot see what is shown, and you cannot hear because of background noise or a poorly placed microphone.


    The background music is annoying. I recommend you turn it off after a few minutes.


    Advice to authors, regarding the importance of production quality --


    You might say, "what I have to say is important so people should watch the video whether the quality is good or bad." Perhaps people should watch, but they will not. Along the same lines, people will not read poorly written papers, with grammatical errors, spelling errors, run-on sentences, tangled syntax and the other problems your high school teacher warned you about. In a sense, this is unfair. Especially if you are not a native speaker of English, you may have difficulty writing good papers. Unfortunately, while it may be unfair, it is a fact that people will not read poorly-written papers, no matter how important the content is. I know this from the download statistics at LENR-CANR.org. Here is the graph of the number of downloads per paper:




    The ones on the left side are all well written. They also have important content. If there is one down at rank 600 with important content, it is probably badly written. The important + well written papers were by authors such as Ed Storms. Ed has given impromptu lectures which I transcribed. Extemporaneous presentations. The text came out better organized and more clearly expressed than most papers that authors have struggled with for weeks. Mel Miles, Pam Boss and Mike McKubre are also capable of doing that. Most people cannot pull that off. If you cannot, you should write many drafts of a paper until you get it right.


    If you are not a native speaker of English and you have trouble writing, I strongly recommend you have a native speaker edit your paper. Be prepared for many suggested changes. Do not be upset by such extensive changes. It is not a judgement of the scientific quality of your paper. It means your English is poor. I volunteer to help people write English. I wrote data processing technical manuals for many years, and I have copy edited 325 cold fusion papers. As I said, if you send me a paper, do not be upset if I recommend hundreds of changes with entire paragraphs rewritten. That is what a copy-editor does.

  • He mentions it in the video. I forget the number, but it's in the low hundreds of mW iirc.

    You are right. Starting around minute 3:46 he says the calorimeter goes up to 1000°C and precision is 100 to 200 mW. That is remarkably high precision for such high temperatures. Anyway, you can measure 10 W with confidence if your precision is 200 mW (50 times the value you measure).


    I wrote:


    Jean-Paul says they need more heat to make practical devices. I think 10 W could be used for thousands of lucrative, important applications in small machines such as cell phones.


    This might be possible because the reaction does not need any input power. On the other hand it needs a very hot core. That might be dangerous. Perhaps it could only be used for stand-alone devices such as remote monitors. I discussed this here, p. 12:


    https://lenr-canr.org/acrobat/RothwellJmoreaboutw.pdf


    It may seem unlikely that anyone would ever put something with a tiny, 800°C hot core into their pocket. You would think safety regulations would forbid this. You would be wrong. When the battery in a cell phone short circuits, it can heat up enough to ignite. This has happened when people accidentally punctured cell phones, stepped on them, ran them over with cars, or monkeyed with the battery. Here is a dramatic short video of one exploding after being punctured:


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    I hope that a nanoparticle cold fusion reactor would stop reacting as soon as it is exposed to air. I hope it would not produce as much energy as this punctured battery.

    The LEC would be a much better choice for small batteries in devices people carry around, such as cell phones, wristwatches and pacemakers.

  • The lighter is not producing heat when you put it in your pocket. It cools rapidly after you extinguish the flame. So it is no danger. That was not the case with some earlier lighters. The early friction matches would sometimes ignite when you rubbed them together. People would have fires ignite in their pockets. Modern "safety" matches need to rub against a prepared surface with phosphorus in it (I gather). There are still "strike anywhere" kitchen matches with white phosphorous tips.


    The most interesting example from our point of view was a palladium cigarette lighter in the 19th century. It was exposed to hydrogen for a while. It had an airtight cover. When you removed the cover, the hydrogen would degas and then ignite spontaneously. That has happened in some cold fusion experiments in which large cathodes were removed and exposed to air. This confused Kreysa and Morrison because they are scientific illiterates who do not know the difference between power and energy.


    I suppose if the cover of a palladium cigarette lighter was loose, or damaged, it might ignite it in your pocket. It seems like a dangerous thing to carry around. Cold fusion has a million times more potential energy than the chemical reaction from Pd-H, but I hope the cold fusion reaction can be quenched immediately by some method, such as exposure to air. Of course if it all reacted in a very short time, it would produce as much energy as a small tactical nuclear weapon. You, the building, and the whole town would disappear in a cloud of debris. Let's hope that can't happen! But hey, if it can . . . not our problem. As Tom Lehrer said:


    "Once the rockets are up, who cares where they come down?

    That's not my department!" says Wernher von Braun

  • Hey, thanks for watching this video. This work on the nanopowder is amazing and I am really hoping they are able to scale it up. These guys and the whole CleanHME program is up in January, so I hope they can get funding to continue.


    I actually will be doing another version of this movie to remove the light flicker in some of the scenes. I couldn't see it on my computer, but after uploading, I could see it bad on the phone. So that will get fixed and hopefully not send anybody into a seizure. I am lucky that most of you all focus on the science demos and not the lighting!


    The music works for most people. It really works to hide the hum in some lab scenes, too. I LOVE it and am inclined to turn it UP, but I won't do that.


    An additional "French" version of the movie will be uploaded to the SFSNMC channel too, when that's ready.

  • An additional "French" version of the movie will be uploaded to the SFSNMC channel too, when that's ready.

    Do you mean a version with subtitles? You can add subtitles to any YouTube video. It is a lot of work. For my animated video, with help from many friends, I added subtitles in Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Japanese, Portuguese and Russian. Whew!


    You have to break the subtitles into sentences and insert the timing for each sentence. As I said, that is a lot of work. I had no trouble doing this for Chinese, French, Japanese and Russian, because I can read these languages enough to know what they say. I kind of guessed with the other ones. Or I winged it with Google translations. If you want to add subtitles to this video, I can help.


    For a while YouTube only supplied subtitles in the language for the location you log on from. They are now back to letting you select subtitles. Select Options and then Subtitles.


    My video is here:


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    YouTube now inserts advertisements before displaying videos. I find this annoying, so I uploaded a copy of the video to LENR-CANR.org, so people can watch it without interruption, or download it. The copy is linked to the page with the transcripts:


    Video


    https://lenr-canr.org/Collections/Brief%20Introduction%20to%20Cold%20Fusion.mp4

  • Do you mean a version with subtitles? You can add subtitles to any YouTube video. It is a lot of work. For my animated video, with help from many friends, I added subtitles in Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Japanese, Portuguese and Russian. Whew!


    Yeah, you can choose the French Transcript now on the version posted up now. You can choose the Transcript in English or French by going to the Settings wheel button next to the CC button in the bottom right of the Youtube window. Then, choose Captions, I think it is, then which language.


    The French version with have the French Transcript and a French title slide, and the light flicker will be fixed. I just downloaded some additional software to do this, but I won't get to it until this coming Monday. So the audio talking will still be in english, but everything else in French.


    The French transcript was difficult as it did not want to take my uploaded file and it was piece by piece manually. It's a little rough in the beginning, but i got the hang of it.


    Jed, your movie is awesome. I didn't realize there were so many translations though. this would be a good video to promote at the Strasbourg meeting, due to all the language translations you have.

  • Biberian on hydrotalcite. "but when you want to cook rice for 1000 people, it’s more difficult."

    it also depends on what rice...basmati...koshihikari..mochigome..you start with

    there is still a large hydrotalcite parameter space to explore..


    In general, hydrotalcite-derived catalysts showed high activity and

    adequate stability at relatively high temperatures, i.e., above 700 C

    Debek et al 2017

    https://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&opi=89978449&url=https://www.mdpi.com/2073-4344/7/1/32&ved=2ahUKEwjUlaKl5fiGAxVMs1YBHXPOAEQQFnoECBwQAQ&usg=AOvVaw2r_qngGYaI_sJBLlb6h-FX

  • Nanoparticles are well know to be sensitive to superparamagnetism. in some ways could that generate some xsh artefacts ?

  • Asking to my friend Claude (who is not a scientist so be careful ;) ) superparamagnetism is known to increase heat production under varying field (used for cancer treatment)... It seems not the case here, is it ? Maybe AC heating may cause that ?

    Another phenomenon is that when nanoparticles are heated above a threshold, they may transition from a locked magnetic moment, to a more free situation, with strong flipping, causing artifacts not as heat, but as electromagnetic interferences... Maybe it would be nice to measure that ?


    (this is what I understood - :saint: - don't shoot the pianist - explain me as if I'm 15)

    “Only puny secrets need keeping. The biggest secrets are kept by public incredulity.” (Marshall McLuhan)
    twitter @alain_co

  • Agree now about cancer you should have a deeper look on hyperthermia with iron nanoparticles. I know for example a Lenr team using this way.

    Asking to my friend Claude (who is not a scientist so be careful ;) ) superparamagnetism is known to increase heat production under varying field (used for cancer treatment)... It seems not the case here, is it ? Maybe AC heating may cause that ?

    Another phenomenon is that when nanoparticles are heated above a threshold, they may transition from a locked magnetic moment, to a more free situation, with strong flipping, causing artifacts not as heat, but as electromagnetic interferences... Maybe it would be nice to measure that ?


    (this is what I understood - :saint: - don't shoot the pianist - explain me as if I'm 15)

  • Best moment -- when he mixed the nickel/copper/aluminum solution with [something] and the particles precipitated out instantly. Leaving water with 40ppb nickel.


    Which is the Italian group working with their powder and an inexpensive industrial heater?


    But it's obviously a systematic calorimeter error! That suddenly misbehaves at 700C.

  • But it's obviously a systematic calorimeter error! That suddenly misbehaves at 700C.

    I feel the irony, but this threshold, LENR or just superparamagnetism, is not innocent.

    “Only puny secrets need keeping. The biggest secrets are kept by public incredulity.” (Marshall McLuhan)
    twitter @alain_co

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