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Alan Smith Administrator
  • Member since Nov 10th 2015

Posts by Alan Smith

    But every doctor and nurse I have watched always looks at the vaccine before injecting it. They also have to check the expiration date for the vaccine and needle. The standard operating procedures from the CDC say they have to examine the vaccine. See 2:40: "Check the vaccine to make sure it is thoroughly mixed. Make sure there is no discoloration or precipitate. Do NOT administer vaccine if: it is discolored, contains particulate matter, or it is not thoroughly mixed."

    So they do- taught to as I was. But it doesnt happen in a factory producing 50k+ vails of vaccine every day - it was factories I was talking about.

    Slightly off-topic.



    How ‘wonder material’ graphene became a national security concern

    THE GUARDIAN | 6 MINUTE READ

    Regular readers of Chemistry World will be familiar with graphene – the single atom thick sheets of carbon – regularly given fanciful titles such as ‘the wonder material’ in the popular press. Graphene has graced our pages many times (even before it won the physics (really?) Nobel prize in 2010) as the material has exceptional properties including strength and electrical and thermal conductivity. The excitement provoked by graphene has meant there’s been a race to produce the material in significant quantities and at high purity. Enter Perpetuus, a UK company looking to scale-up production of graphene. The planned takeover of Perpetuus – an SME – was nothing out of the ordinary. However, the takeover was launched by a Chinese company, and this set alarm bells ringing in the UK government. The takeover will now be investigated with one senior MP saying that the technology, which could have potential defence applications, should stay with ‘trusted partners’.

    Checking the purity of injectable and transfusable clear liquids has been automated for at least 30 years in most places. The old lab routine of 'shake the bottle and look for turbidity are long gone. Probably a good thing.

    Nice work Alan. I have another plate in the tank right now btw , running at 2.5V and 0.15A. This one was started on monday and will run until (at least) Friday.


    I have been pondering something about the use of HCl with brass or iron cathodes. This was because Stevenson gave us the voltage data for his plates - which were brass. For a lot of the time the voltages he was using were below the Faraday limit so could not possibly break down water into H2/O2. I found this puzzling.


    HCl will chemically attack iron or brass with the evolution of hydrogen. In the case of brass you can see the colour change since it preferentially leaches out the zinc component of the alloy, leaving copper behind- the colour goes from golden to rosy pink. I do suspect the HCl method is good in that chemical hydrogen is produced at the cathode surface underneath the plating, which together with electrolytic water breakdown -= H2 deposition from both sides. Also, my long ago Chemistry tutor told me that the hydrogen produced by the action of HCl on Zinc is monatomic - but he may have been wrong about that. I know that Frank Gordon has used zinc galvanised pipes as electrodes- this may also be important.


    I am thinking of running another plate with an airstone in the tank (porous stone used in conjunction with a pump to aerate aquaria) connected in this case to a hydrogen generator. H2 is not very soluble in water but it might help to have a cloud of microscopic H2 bubbles being attracted to the cathode

    Something to know. over the years a number of threads- post and video's we voluntarily agree on with a check mark have been changed to show we agree to fake science or in some cases just plain junk.

    its a old facebook trick going back 10 years they can pull up but we can not get to anymore. it happens everywhere. they change the context of the post after its out of your view. just part of the long plan they are so proud of. pointless to go back and delete everything, its a well known trap.

    I am not aware of this happening- but then I don't read old posts so much. The only people who might change stuff after the event are the mod/admin team. And we don't do it. The odd obnoxious post might get moved to trash or have the nasty bits removed- generally with an explanatory note attached , Other wise it never happens - we are not the old Soviet Union..

    Prof Pankaj Jain of Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India will be presenting the breakthroughs achieved by him and his group in the theory of low energy nuclear reactions recently.



    Speaker: Prof Pankaj Jain, Dept of Physics, IIT Kanpur Title: Low Energy Reaction of a Deuteron with a Heavy Nucleus



    Date & Time: Monday, 11 Oct 2021 at 11:30 AM GMT/UTC



    Zoom link:


    https://iitk-ac-in.zoom.u/j/92540287203?pwd=V1ozMVBWOVNwZjVYYWdBWG1WSUdrZz09


    Meeting ID: 925 4028 7203 Passcode: LENR-IITK




    Abstract of the talk:


    We use second order time dependent perturbation theory to study the reaction of a deuteron (D) with a heavy nucleus (X). The reaction proceeds by the breakdown of the deuteron into a proton and a neutron, due to the action of the first perturbation. The neutron gets captured by the heavy nucleus with the emission of a free proton. The process leads to emission of two photons, one at each vertex (or perturbation). We compute the reaction rate of a specific process in a condensed medium in which the two photons are emitted in coincidence and show that it is sufficiently large to be observable in a laboratory. No special medium conditions are required. Hence we conclude that nuclear reactions can take place at low energies at observable rates. However a detailed application to experimental results is still lacking. We explain the physical mechanism that makes such low energy reactions possible.



    All interested are welcome to attend.

    Climate and complex systems share Nobel

    Three researchers have won the 2021 Nobel Prize in Physics for their work on describing complex physical systems — including foundational research that predicted that increasing levels of carbon dioxide in Earth’s atmosphere would raise global temperatures. Syukuro Manabe and Klaus Hasselmann share half of the prize of 10 million Swedish kronor (US$1.15 million) for modelling the physics of Earth’s climate. Theoretical physicist Giorgio Parisi was awarded the other half for his contributions to the theory of complex systems. His work has affected many areas, from neuroscience to how granular materials pack.


    Asked if the Nobel committee was sending a message to world leaders with the award, Göran Hansson, secretary-general of the prize-awarding Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, said: “What we are saying is that the modelling climate is solidly based in physical theory and solid physics.” He added: “Global warming is resting on solid science. That is the message.”

    Nature | 5 min read

    Prof Pankaj Jain of Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India will be presenting the breakthroughs achieved by him and his group in the theory of low energy nuclear reactions recently.



    Speaker: Prof Pankaj Jain, Dept of Physics, IIT Kanpur Title: Low Energy Reaction of a Deuteron with a Heavy Nucleus



    Date & Time: Monday, 11 Oct 2021 at 11:30 AM GMT/UTC



    Zoom link:


    https://iitk-ac-in.zoom.u/j/92540287203?pwd=V1ozMVBWOVNwZjVYYWdBWG1WSUdrZz09


    Meeting ID: 925 4028 7203 Passcode: LENR-IITK




    Abstract of the talk:


    We use second order time dependent perturbation theory to study the reaction of a deuteron (D) with a heavy nucleus (X). The reaction proceeds by the breakdown of the deuteron into a proton and a neutron, due to the action of the first perturbation. The neutron gets captured by the heavy nucleus with the emission of a free proton. The process leads to emission of two photons, one at each vertex (or perturbation). We compute the reaction rate of a specific process in a condensed medium in which the two photons are emitted in coincidence and show that it is sufficiently large to be observable in a laboratory. No special medium conditions are required. Hence we conclude that nuclear reactions can take place at low energies at observable rates. However a detailed application to experimental results is still lacking. We explain the physical mechanism that makes such low energy reactions possible.



    All interested are welcome to attend.

    Update from Leif Holmlid.


    (PDF) Controlling the process of muon formation for muon-catalyzed fusion: method of non-destructive average muon sign detection Open Access EPJ Techniques and Instrumentation
    PDF | Introduction Muons are observed from pulsed laser impact on ultra-dense hydrogen H(0) [1-3] by plastic scintillators and solid converters, with... |…
    www.researchgate.net


    Abstract The recent development of intense muon sources (Holmlid, Swedish Patent SE 539,684 C 2 (2017)) is crucial for the use of muon-catalyzed fusion reactors (L. Holmlid, Fusion Science and Technology 75, 208 (2019)) which are likely to be the first generation of practical fusion reactors. For this purpose, only negative muons are useful. For existing sources where negative muons can be ejected (if not formed) preferentially, it is neces-sary to know the amount of negative muons to determine and optimize the fusion reactor efficiency on-line. Here, a method is developed to measure the absolute muon flux and its average sign without collecting or deflecting the muons. The muons from the patented muon generator have an energy of 100 MeV and above and an inten-sity of 1013 muons per laser pulse. Here, the detection of the relativistic laser-induced muons from H(0) is reported with a standard particle beam method, using a wire coil on a ferrite toroid as detector for the relativistic particles. The coil detection method shows that these relativistic particles are charged, thus not photons, neutrinos or neu-tral kaons. This makes the coil method superior to scintillator methods and it is the only possible method due to the large muon intensity. If an equal number of positive and negative mouns passed the coil, no signal would be observed. The signal at the coil in the case shown here is due to relativistic positive muons as concluded from a signal charge sign verification in the coil.

    I know little about horses, but I would guess if you tried and put a pill down its throat, you would lose a finger or two.

    Also the pill for 700 kilos of horse would be almost the size of a golf ball. Almost all horse medicine is sold either as flavoured paste you can squirt in or powder to sprinkle on their food.

    The amount the UK government has to spend on state pensions will fall by £1.5bn by 2022, partly because of over-65s dying of Covid, forecasts suggest. The government will also receive an extra £0.9bn from inheritance tax, partly due to Covid-related deaths.


    The figures have been published by the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) - the government's fiscal watchdog.

    It said it had "revised up our assumption for excess deaths this year and next relative to November".

    More than 144,000 deaths involving Covid-19 have occurred in the UK since the start of the pandemic, figures published by the UK's statistics agencies show.


    The majority of coronavirus deaths have been among people aged over 65, many of whom will have been receiving the state pension.


    The OBR estimates spending on the state pension will fall by £600m in 2020-21 and £900m in 2021-22 compared with forecasts made before the pandemic.The watchdog said the forecast for lower state pension spending was partly because of the weaker outlook for average earnings growth, which lowers the effect of the yearly triple lock uprating.


    But it added that excess deaths due to the pandemic have also reduced the number of people receiving pensions.

    "With virus-related deaths rising sharply again in recent months, we have revised up the number of excess pensioner-age deaths in 2020-21 from 90,000 in our November forecast to around 100,000 in this one," the OBR said in its Economic And Fiscal Outlook, which is published alongside the Budget.


    It has increased its forecast because: "Higher virus-related deaths in the current wave of the virus have outweighed the effect of lockdown reducing deaths from other causes, particularly from influenza and other respiratory diseases".


    Meanwhile the Treasury predicted that inheritance tax receipts will increase from £5.1bn in 2019-20 to £6bn in 2021-22, before falling to £5.8bn the following year. The rise in inheritance tax receipts is partly due to the freeze of inheritance tax thresholds until April 2026 announced in the Budget and the growth in the value of estates, but higher Covid-19 deaths will also contribute, the OBR said.

    A decade’s worth of telescope observations of the sun have revealed a startling mystery: Gamma rays, the highest frequency waves of light, radiate from our nearest star seven times more abundantly than expected. Stranger still, despite this extreme excess of gamma rays overall, a narrow bandwidth of frequencies is curiously absent.


    The surplus light, the gap in the spectrum, and other surprises about the solar gamma-ray signal potentially point to unknown features of the sun’s magnetic field, or more exotic physics.


    “It’s amazing that we were so spectacularly wrong about something we should understand really well: the sun,” said Brian Fields, a particle astrophysicist at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.


    The unexpected signal has emerged in data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, a NASA observatory that scans the sky from its outpost in low-Earth orbit. As more Fermi data have accrued, revealing the spectrum of gamma rays coming from the sun in ever-greater detail, the puzzles have only proliferated.



    The Sun Is Stranger Than Astrophysicists Imagined
    The sun radiates far more high-frequency light than expected, raising questions about unknown features of the sun’s magnetic field and the possibility of even…
    getpocket.com

    This is a detailed study showing the (relatively) easy synthesis of G-CN nanotubes and nanosheets from raw materials, and their efficiency as hydrogen adsorption systems.


    " A facile, one step fabrication method was disclosed in this work which could be used to synthesize porous g-C3N4 nanosheets with high specific surface area and pore volume. The as synthesized g-C3N4 nanosheets not only had the advantage for hydrogen storage, but also could be expected to have good performance in other fields like photocatalyst. In addition, this research reported a nickel based modification method to create defects and pores on g-C3N4 nanotubes. This methodology should pave a new avenue to modify g-C3N4 based materials for advanced applications like photocatalyst, solar cell and lithium battery."