nickec Verified User
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  • from California, USA
  • Member since Jan 20th 2015

Posts by nickec

    The definition says yes. Every muon is negative. Every anti-muon is positive.


    And a lot of muons pass through our bodies: ~10,000 muons per minute.


    "...


    Secondary effects


    At sea level, the majority of cosmic ray secondaries are highly penetrating muons. About 10,000 muons pass through our bodies every minute. Some of these muons will ionize molecules as they go through our flesh, occasionally leading to genetic mutations that may be harmful.


    At present, the average human receives the equivalent of about 10 chest X-rays per year from cosmic rays. We shouldn't be alarmed by this, since it is just part of the natural background radiation under which humans and our ancestors have been exposed to for eons. Indeed, cosmic-ray-induced mutations may sometimes be beneficial.


    "It is clear that in some way cosmic rays shaped evolution of organisms on Earth," says Franco Ferrari from the University of Szczecin in Poland.


    In a recent issue of the journal Astrobiology, Ferrari and Ewa Szuszkiewicz from the same university reviewed what we know about cosmic rays, and they argue that the current biological relevance of these particles is not necessarily representative of the past.


    "It is very likely that organisms of early Earth possessed DNA that was unstable and could easily mutate under external agents, more so, perhaps, than the DNA of present-day bacteria," the authors write.


    ..."


    From: https://www.space.com/7193-death-rays-space-bad.html


    .

    We live now in what is for many people a post-factual world. ...

    The factual world will win out in the end.


    Embracing the post-factual is self-destructive.


    For me, the question is, how long will it take to die off?


    Still, I believe the lesson will be learned: Facts count. And not just in Science.

    I am trying to look away.  Yet my personality seems to require me to inquire and penetrate the unknown. An inconvenient trait sometimes. Thankfully, there is an upside. Still, here I will strive to invest my thinking in more immediately practical areas. Honestly, I will likely be back at puzzling this out sooner than later.


    I refer here not to the 100W power supply. I refer to the hidden. The desire to deeply know the processes all around us, right under our noses, yet unseen, untouched, unheard.

    Have you already considered scratching the plate surface?


    One might divide the plate into sections, say 3 by 3. Then proceed to abrade each area using different methods - or grits.


    I wonder if rolling a knurler over the plate might be useful? Or perhaps access to a shaper could get the job done.


    "Brass is difficult to file because it is softer than steel, but tough. This

    demands teeth that are sharp, sturdy and cut to prevent grooving
    and running the file off the work. The Brass file has a short upcut
    angle and a fine long angle over-cut which produces small scallops
    to break up filings and enable the file to clear. With pressure, the
    sharp high-cut teeth bite deep, with less pressure, the short upcut
    angle smoothes."


    Please forgive me if this is something you have already explored, Alan.

    If only science backed up your position, Shane. Sadly, it does not.


    "Leave them alone I say. They are only a threat to themselves, not us."


    They are a threat to every living human. In the following sense. The larger the available infection target population, the more possible mutation cycles, and the greater likelihood of a more deadly strain of covid.


    This is very well understood among biologists. To underestimate the danger endangers us all.


    It is, in my opinion, short-sighted to assume that our life choices have little impact on others.


    I respect your opinion Shane, however, I strongly disagree with it. We are all joined at the hip.

    The travails of a researcher in another field parallel those involved in LENR.


    The illusion of knowledge may be a greater threat to real knowledge than ignorance.


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    Is this related to the LEC? I wonder. Thoughts, ladies and gentlemen?


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    @Ahlfors- can you out a link in for the above graphics please -I find them almost unreadable.

    Another way to zoom into poor behaving images: Right click on image, open the image in a new tab, then hold down Control while keying + or -.


    Basically you want to open only the image. Then you can zoom to your hearts content.


    To open ONLY the image you must paste the image location into a browser tab. Copy the image location into the URL bar.


    When you left click on an image in this Forum a layer is drawn which interferes with zooming. You can see this by examining the URL. If it ends with anything other than an image file, then zooming will be problematic on this Forum.

    Beyond the need to find alternatives or risk survival/discomfort is the promise of "better".


    Better can mean cleaner, smaller, lighter, longer-lived, denser, simpler, easier, or more adaptable.


    I believe a major challenge is making new things which are so much better that the old things cannot compete.


    Resting on your laurels, when better can be found, seems a bit silly, especially if you thrive on challenges.


    Let us hope that human nature's desire for challenge continues and strengthens.