Online

Robert Horst Member

  • Male
  • Member since Mar 15th 2016
Posts
80
Likes Received
110
Points
510
Profile Hits
711
  • Robert Horst

    Replied to the thread Unconventional electrolysis.
    Post
    (Quote from can)

    LTspice is a little harder to learn, but gives much better simulation of real components. That gets more important as you use MOSFETs and other active components,or need to simulate the core saturation of inductors. It also allows much…
  • Robert Horst

    Replied to the thread Unconventional electrolysis.
    Post
    You may want to try LTspice which is a free, full function Spice simulator.

    https://www.analog.com/en/desi…UvlzR6RuKBdBoC0oEQAvD_BwE
    I have use both Mac and PC, versions, but found the PC version to work better.

    Regarding interference from your 12V…
  • Robert Horst

    Replied to the thread FP's experiments discussion.
    Post
    (Quote from Ascoli65)

    Thanks for spotting this. The method is OK. Near 100V the graph has a very fat line because temperature and voltage are right next to each other. One side of the fat line is about 1655 and the other side 1665. I probably guessed…
  • Robert Horst

    Replied to the thread Unconventional electrolysis.
    Post
    This circuit operates much differently. This is a boost circuit where the short causes energy to be stored in the inductor, then when the short clears, very high voltage appears at its output. If the high voltage then causes ionization of air across…
  • Robert Horst

    Replied to the thread Unconventional electrolysis.
    Post
    (Quote from can)

    This circuit will certainly produce a big current spike.
    You would need to use a cap with a very low ESR and connect it with heavy wires to keep the wiring resistance low. Maybe a cap like this would work:

  • Robert Horst

    Replied to the thread FP's experiments discussion.
    Post
    (Quote from Ascoli65)

    I took this into account with a very tedious but accurate way of measuring the times.
    I took a screen shot of Fig 6B and pasted it into Visio, then rotated it to get the Y axis vertical (-0.35 degrees).

    Then drew a line from…
  • Robert Horst

    Post
    (Quote from can)

    Just tried it also. Very easy to learn and use. I like that it is easy to pick the points and then do fine adjustments to make them land exactly on the lines of the graphs.
  • Robert Horst

    Replied to the thread FP's experiments discussion.
    Post
    Here is an analysis of the Fleischmann 92 paper based only on the voltage plot in Fig 6B.

    First, the cell can be modeled as a constant current source feeding a 1.54V zener diode in series with a variable resistance. The resistance is a function of the…
  • Robert Horst

    Replied to the thread LION-AG Experiment.
    Post
    (Quote from Bruce__H)

    My data came from this post:
    LION-AG Experiment


    I downloaded the zip file called
    LION4_noholes_interpolated.zip

    and then plotted the data from 003.csv

    Where did your data come from?
  • Robert Horst

    Replied to the thread LION-AG Experiment.
    Post
    (Quote from Bruce__H)

    The double line structure looks like an artifact of the way you plotted it (points without connecting lines). The temperature just has small variations around 33C. See my plot of the same region below.




    The way I read the…
  • Robert Horst

    Replied to the thread LION-AG Experiment.
    Post
    Here is a plot of the current and ThermoA from a short portion of the run 3 raw data spreadsheet:





    A couple of odd things. Most of the time the current oscillates around zero from +.19 to -.30 (Amps presumably). I assume there should never be…
  • Robert Horst

    Post
    Here is a paper from 2017. Looks like he is now applying his ideas to DNA.

    https://philarchive.org/archive/SARANM

    A New Method for Analysis of Biomolecules Using the BSM-SG Atomic Models
    Stoyan Sarg Sargoytchev
    World Institute for Scientific…
  • Robert Horst

    Replied to the thread FP's experiments discussion.
    Post
    The 1992 paper has more data supporting the foam hypothesis.

    In the Enthalpy calculation, they compute an average input power of 37.5W for the 10 (or 11) minute boiloff period. The graphs show that they are using a .5 A constant current supply, which…
  • Robert Horst

    Replied to the thread Unconventional electrolysis.
    Post
    How about a high current PWM LED controller?

    The MAX16818 is designed for up to 30A, 7-28V, and a switching frequency set by an external resistor from 125 KHz to 1.5 MHz. You could use poor filtering to get the PWM cycles to show up at the load.


  • Robert Horst

    Replied to the thread FP's experiments discussion.
    Post
    I think Kirk was pointing to his reply to your question (from Sept, 2017). It seems like he proposed an experiment to show how much the calibration constant changes when the location of the recombination changes. The question is whether the LXH…
  • Robert Horst

    Replied to the thread Unconventional electrolysis.
    Post
    For AC tests, you might try a development board with a stepper driver like the ST L6208. It can drive up to 52V, 2.8A RMS and 100 KHz.

    see: https://www.digikey.com/produc…6208PD/497-4136-ND/724253
    The ST motor development boards also have a nice…
  • Robert Horst

    Replied to the thread FP's experiments discussion.
    Post
    The foam issue is not the only problem with the HXH (boil off) phase in the Fleischmann 1992 ICCF paper.


    The Enthalpy Input calculation says:
    "By electrolysis = (Ecell - 1.54) × Cell Current ~ 22,500J"

    It should not be hard to measure power to an…
  • Robert Horst

    Post
    The Lindau-Nobel Meeting, held annually, brings Nobel Laureates together with top graduate students from around the world for a week of lectures and small-group discussions. Each meeting has a theme, and the 2019 theme is Physics. The meeting will…
  • Robert Horst

    Replied to the thread FP's experiments discussion.
    Post
    (Quote from Ascoli65)

    It looks to me like the video timestamps are time-of-day because they all are for hours 0-23. But the graphs in the paper appear to be time from the start of the experiment (in seconds or Ksec). So to line them up, you need to…