Fusionist's NiO FiberFrax experiments

  • So far, it looks like my end is completely public. So that might work for something. So, ogfusionst, if you are around, let me know here if you have responded under "[lexicon]conversation[/lexicon]"-- and do try to contact me there, please.


    Longview

    • Official Post

    @Longview:
    "Participants" is like normal receiver or CC in an E-Mail, so each "participant" of this [lexicon]conversation[/lexicon] can see the other participants you added in this field. This is the normal way to add participants to a [lexicon]conversation[/lexicon].


    "Invisible Participants" is like BCC in an E-Mail, participants you add into this field will be not visible for the other participants, so the others don't see that "invisible participants" also received this message. Normaly you don't have to use this.


    No matter how you add the participants, the [lexicon]conversation[/lexicon] is everytime private within these people you added.

  • I sent patent number as you requested via private mail. Did you receive?


    Have not seen it. Either here, at my own "Conversations", nor at my personal email (no surprise there, since I did not allow that in the checked box, unless it was an accident). I did send you a fragment of my email with some explanation. Of course that would not have worked. We'll just keep working on it. As I mentioned my script blocker, a cheap form of malware protection, could be messing things up. But on the other hand, that is exactly the level of protection many should consider emplacing.


    Longview

  • [quote='ogfusionist','http://www.lenr-forum.com/forum/index.php/Thread/1738-Fusionist-s-NiO-FiberFrax-experiments/?postID=5935#post5935']patent number is redacted /quote]


    Thank you sir, I have transcribed it. MIght as well delete, just for privacy sake, unless you want the publicity....


    Give a me a couple of days to digest the contents.


    And I agree, it seems hard to imagine exactly how private that system is. Of course I am not using it correctly... that is a given.

  • Please delete.


    This is probably just the opposite of your interest in activation energy. We wanted to insure that a tube sitting in a silo for seven years would fire when required. This coating reduced the permeation of hydrogen through the nickel envelope by a factor of 10,000. A well processed tube had no problem with an other gas. Hydrogen is insidious and continuously moves through metals. After finding that the patented coating was more than adequate we followed up with a test using a palladium diffuser to inlet hydrogen into a tube up to the expected pressure without the barrier coating. About a micron if I recall correctly. Turned out that the hot filament and cathode is a great pump for H2 and the tube had no problem meeting microwave specs after about 10 seconds.


    These tubes as missile guidance systems were nearly used many years ago when our radar identified the rising moon as a Soviet missile launch and almost launched a counter attack.

  • http://novametcorp.net/pdf/Datasheets/Novamet Green Nickel Oxide 01-15.pdf


    Novamet sells what might be appropriate nickel oxide powder.


    Fiber optic sensing seems expensive - I found one site which listed a $13,000 instrument. http://www.chiralphotonics.com/Web/1000ctempsensor.html


    Pottery glaze has been mentioned as an affordable source of oxide.


    Might thermocouples suffice?


    I hope to turn the discussion in the direction of specifics re preparing an experiment.


    Could lithium aluminum hydride serve as a hydrogen source?


    Summary:
    Kanthal wrapped mullite tube
    TC sensing
    Reactor contents: Ceramic mesh/matting, Nickel (II) Oxide, LAH

  • http://novametcorp.net/pdf/Datasheets/Novamet Green Nickel Oxide 01-15.pdf


    Novamet sells what might be appropriate nickel oxide powder.


    Nickec, that link seems to be broken somehow. Error 404 I think.



    Fiber optic sensing seems expensive - I found one site which listed a $13,000 instrument. http://www.chiralphotonics.com/Web/1000ctempsensor.html


    The "fiber" is simply a quartz or sapphire rod of modest diameter, it is really "light pipe" and might have a gradient ceramic coating to assure high transmission. Rigid ones can be homemade. The length is just enough to get well outside the furnace wall. The specitrum analyzer can be an Ocean Optic UV/Vis, on eBay for $500 but in any case a list of less than $1000.



    Pottery glaze has been mentioned as an affordable source of oxide.


    Yse, I had a link for that in an earlier post to ogfusionist. It is easy to find with Google, something like "Nickel oxide, green, ceramic paint" I mentioned earlier the purification or at least segregation of the ingredients, a glaze is likely to have some glassy stuff in it that you don't want to infuse into your fibrous alumina. Fortunately the green of the NiO makes it easy to follow simple separatory schemes. Should be able to get to a nice green suspesion in some pure suitable solvent much like ogfusionists original acetone/amyl acetate or whatever it was. I would see if any particular solvent partitions the green well against say hexane or mineral spirits. The oxide nature of the nickel is going to make it somewhat hydrophilic in mild acid. Note there are nice salts of nickel such as nickel acetate that are soluble in water and alcohol--- that salt itself is green.... it is an interesting starting point for making a simple path to green fibrous alumina, as I mentioned much earlier. The Merck Index indicates that nickel acetate gives off acetic acid on standing... I bet the nickel is oxidizing in air for that to happen. The same reaction could happen in the fibrous alumina matrix, especially if the alumina were well oxidized initially. I discussed that a few times as well. One of the motives there was to get away from the hydrogen bake-out, and oxidize the nickel in situ.



    Might thermocouples suffice?


    Perhaps, but see note below. Essentially the difficulty is the conductivity of the probe itself. The mesh could have well over unity behavior but the quantity of heat might be low enough to be drained down by the probe.



    I hope to turn the discussion in the direction of specifics re preparing an experiment.


    Yes, that is my intention as well. Good on you!



    Could lithium aluminum hydride serve as a hydrogen source?


    Always easier to make H2 (electrolysis of water with graphite electrodes) rather than buy it. Always easier to buy H2 than to buy LiAlH4 (I suspect). And further the safety issues are much less with the free gas. The regulation of the flow, the calculation of the chemistry is much simpler with H2. Further, ogfusionist has always maintained that the "fuel" was simply hydrogen. If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Later other oxides of metals can be tried, combinations and so on. Further D2 and HD could be tried as the gases or the hydrides, deuterides. Save your LiAlH4 for Parkhomov replications!



    Summary:
    Kanthal wrapped mullite tube
    TC sensing
    Reactor contents: Ceramic mesh/matting, Nickel (II) Oxide, LAH


    See above comments inter-lineally. I would use a furnace, because the diagnostic here is the rise in interior temperature of the fibrous alumina, not in the melting of the mullite and so on. That is why the low conductivity and optical sensing is important. Excess heat will be seen very readily because of the low conductivity of the fibrous mesh (it is very tight, but very light weight, very white -- thus reflective, it can respond beautifully to internal heat production by temperature elevation (luminescence etc.). The only way to remove much of any excess heat for outside "work" is really either through the flow of inert diluent gas or the H2 itself.

  • For this repeat of the FiberFrax/NiO/H2 experiment I'd recommend bottled hydrogen as the gas source. No point putting up with the dangerous properties of LiAlH4 when bottled gas works fine. For the NiO slurry I'd recommend Reagent Grade NiO from a chemical supply source. The shelf grade paint test would come later. The NiO should be ball milled until colloidal in size. Air firing of the alumina FiberFrax before soaking with the slurry should be ok. Inexpensive Chromel/Alumel couples worked fine for this temperature range For this test for replication I'd stick to the protocol I've posted. First see if it replicates then test variations.

  • Corrected link in my post above to Novamet Green Nickel Oxide.


    Repeating it below for convenience.


    http://novametcorp.net/pdf/Datasheets/Novamet Green Nickel Oxide 01-15.pdf


    That looks very good. We have to imagine that this Type F at around a micron is certainly fine enough to replicate the fibrous alumina anecdotal effort of decades ago.


    I still imagine that oxidation in situ might be a good way to get a bound nickel at something like +2 oxidation but also strong linkage to the substrate.


    But that would be for the next step. I suspect 1 micron is as fine as one would have from weeks of ceramic ball milling-- hopefully there was no unknown effect from the residues of the milling medium. Ogfusionist did specify what that was, I think it also was alumina. Perhaps he will respecify that for us.

  • The extensive ball milling I used introduced alumina in the low percentage range. The analysis was by emission spectroscopy. The amount of alumina was expected from previous work; the wear on the alumina pot and rollers is considerable when long milling intervals are used.


    The Novamet process is a carbonyl nickel reaction that implies a high degree of purity. Starting with this for the fusion experiment would indicate if alumina is necessary in the reactor charge. I'd expect that if the alumina FiberFrax is green after impregnation the material would initiate hydrogen fusion. Certainly worth a try. Once the simple reactor configuration is assembled experiments to find optimum catalyst purity would be easy to repeat.

  • The reactor I used was loaded with nickelous oxide on Al2O3 FiberFrax. The hydrogen fusion relies on the NiO atomic configuration. The nickel valence must be maintained at 830 C where H2 dissociates to interact with the atomic array and fuse.