Infinite Energy: Report of Excess Heat and Neutrons from Russian Experiments by Sergei Tcvetkov

  • Infinite energy publish an article of Marianne Macy interviewing Sergei Tcvetkov whose "Work in Nürnberg Shows Encouraging Results with Titanium and Deuterium"


    http://www.infinite-energy.com/images/pdfs/Tcvetkov.pdf


    This protocol is based on Titanium deuteride and gas permeation.


    Tcvetkov wrote:


    Right now with my protocol I can give you exact figures. Here are the results of my measurements. This protocol reflects the latest experimental results. The figures reflected are the most recent. The excess heat, the calculated excess heat, is deuterated titanium at 573 degrees, the sum of COP is 1.789 Joules, or 1 degree per gram…131 Kj…For the time of 190 seconds this amounts to 695 Watts. The extended power for the heating of the sample is calculated at 153 W. That means that the excess power coefficient is 224. This is the data coming from one of the experiments.


    I imagine @SERGEI himself will tell us more 8o

  • His heating time is so short (measured in seconds)- it might might not be a chemical reaction of the deuterium with the metal. Why cant he keep it going for an hour or longer? I suspect trickery and a con job. Of course if he is getting neutrons there might be an LENR component. There are LENR neutron producing reactions already published. Prelas saw neutrons from alternately cryocooled and heated titanium deuteride chips. The change in phase squeezed the crystal lattice and he observed neutron production.


    I have designed an LENR reactor based on that phenomenon. My lab lacks good calorimetry equipment. Anyone who wants an R&D partnership should contact me at [email protected]
    We will share patent royalties.

  • Hi all


    This seems to a be version of the so called "LENR Backfire Experiment" where a burst of energy in the NAE melts it and poisons the LENR rather like a car backfiring. This seems to be part of the stable LENR discovery phase where the developer is searching for the Goldilocks zone in an LENR. MFMP had a similar experiment early on which encouraged them.


    Kind Regards walke

  • I have echo on that experiments by experience LENR scientists.


    TiD reaction was initially observed by Scaramuzzi, identified by neutron bursts.
    In BARC they also observed tritium production with neutrons, localized on spots, especially on metal treated when cold. Some feel it may be an evidence of ed Storms crack theory.
    There is a debate whether it is LENR or fractofusion (hot fusion). BARC team observed an anomalous branching ratio which put it on the LENR side.
    Piantelli did many similar experiments of that kind with nickel, titanium and other transition metal. he warned about radiation hazard.

  • Hi all


    Here is the report from MFMP's "LENR Backfire Experiment" along with a video where they discuss it, for those who have not seen it.
    http://coldfusion3.com/blog/sm…l-verified-as-lenr-device
    There was also a version of the E-Cat where an LENR backfire seemed to be observed by Celani and others. I will try to dig out that report. In most of these Deuterium is the type of Hydrogen used.


    Kind Regards walker

  • What is being described in the IE article is simple gas loading of Ti. The temperature spike is caused by the heat of formation of titanium hydride being released as the hydrogen is absorbed. This is standard, everyday hydride chemistry. For ex., see J. E. Klein, Fusion Sci. & Tech. 41 (2002) 764, where a Ti-containing vessel is loaded and unloaded multiple times. In that series of experiments a temperature rise of 600+ degrees was observed in one part of the vessel, while lesser rises were noted elsewhere. The temperature you measure depends on where you place your thermocouple, and 600+ degree changes are typical for the most active spots. No excess energy needed.

  • What is being described in the IE article is simple gas loading of Ti. The temperature spike is caused by the heat of formation of titanium hydride being released as the hydrogen is absorbed. This is standard, everyday hydride chemistry. For ex., see J. E. Klein, Fusion Sci. & Tech. 41 (2002) 764, where a Ti-containing vessel is loaded and unloaded multiple times. In that series of experiments a temperature rise of 600+ degrees was observed in one part of the vessel, while lesser rises were noted elsewhere. The temperature you measure depends on where you place your thermocouple, and 600+ degree changes are typical for the most active spots. No excess energy needed.




    Tcvetkov wrote


    "
    Right now with my protocol I can give you exact figures. Here are the
    results of my measurements. This protocol reflects the latest
    experimental results. The figures reflected are the most recent. The
    excess heat, the calculated excess heat, is deuterated titanium at 573
    degrees, the sum of COP is 1.789 Joules, or 1 degree per gram…131 Kj…For
    the time of 190 seconds this amounts to 695 Watts. The extended power
    for the heating of the sample is calculated at 153 W. That means that
    the excess power coefficient is 224. This is the data coming from one of
    the experiments. [end Tcvetkov quote]


    The interesting point Kirkshanahan asserts is that this is all simply 'heat of solution' for D in Ti. And that the
    apparent magnitude of the heat produced is also a function of "where you place your thermocouple". It seems that an
    effective re-examination of the issue, if there is to be one, would require allowing thermal equilibration
    after the dissolution with deuterium, that is, to measure total delta T over total mass. Of course that loses
    all the localization information while also reducing the magnitude of any possible temperature rise (or fall).


    An idealized test would involve calorimetry, in which a suitable insulated container surrounds the reacting Ti. There
    is a risk that textbook, or systematic evaluations of enthalpy (delta H) and entropy (delta S) and hence overall
    delta G (Gibbs free energy) for such dissolutions may have themselves been compromised to an unknown extent by
    some LENR processes (if they happened to be present). It is another of those situations where a complete examination
    would also include isotopic analysis and particularly very high resolution Residual Gas Analysis.


    And of course there are several reports that post dissolution treatment of resulting deuterides can initiate LENR. Those
    treatments can involve temperature, pressure and probably even magnetic, electromagnetic, electrostatic, or phonon
    stimulation or any combination of some or all of those.


    So a complete analysis there would be a long and detailed process involving deuterium loading, treating with various stimuli and
    looking for both thermal and isotopic results.


    In my view, the whole thing is not so easily dismissed without careful consideration of possibilities beyond the
    standard dogmas of thermodynamics. We may often be looking for small effects [Rpssi / Parkhomov replications]
    or very large effects [Lipinski UGC, Q over 7400]. The former case admittedly making the task more difficult
    than is usual in ordinary chemical thermodynamics. The reward in the end, even with small effects,
    is that such evidence could provide a basis for understanding the mechanisms and hence the possibility, at least, of
    making reactors with far more substantial output.