Rossi Lugano/early demo's revisited. (technical)

  • LDM

    Thank you for this whiff of morning freshness :)

    I admit that I am not yet well aware concerning all of things in relation with plasmas, however, in cold plasmas, indeed, this is especially electrons which move due to their relative lightness.

    This is even more true if they are subjected to a magnetic field.

    I even learned about ultra cold plasmas existence to kill viruses and bacteria (fashion topic).

    It's also important to understand that in a cold plasma less than 1% of atoms are ionized, the rest being neutral.

    The essential question would be:

    how could we make 2 atoms meet at same place in this plasma so that they "Lenr" react ?

    As i explained in my paper we need to do radical H monoatomic.

    Rossi's used different ways to do that in the past as i explained earlier.

    Here i expect he uses simply high temperature because above 2500° , H mono can stay at monoatomic stage.

    This is why for example space shuttle rocket engines avoided going beyond this temperature because make H dissociated is endothermic so rocket engines is losing thrust above this.

    Now, my main question should be how reach this nuclei level of temperature for a cold plasma ?

    Again, if ionization helps to break molecule, however never you will find both H monoatomic species if Lenr needs this ?

    That would be the trick Rossi found about his QX, i expect..


  • Thanks. I see that the diagrams are from http://www.astro.utu.fi/~cflynn/astroII/l3.html#bremsel

    It should be noted that this has to do with radiation from electrons as they are decelerated by collision or near collision with positive ions.

    What I don't know is how strong this effect is compared with the normal discrete Rydberg type of radiation as electrons move to different atomic orbitals.


    Anyway, you mentioning that a thick plasma does not a black body make, reminds me of Dr. Pierre Robitaille's theory that the sun emits as a blackbody because it emits, not as a dense plasma, but as a condensed (iirc) hexagonal hydrogen layer at the surface. (!)


  • In earlier posts I have come to the conclusion that the MFMP Lugano thermal simulation must have been wrong and that this was possibly due to the cast being a not pure (composite) Alumina or being casted of another ceramic type.

    In my last post on this subject ( post #736 ) it was again shown that the total emissivity of the MFMP cast must have been substantially lower then that of standard Alumina


    Looking at the published type of cast published by the MFMP ( Cotronics RTC-60 ) and the picture Para showed in one of his posts (RTC-70) I tried to imagine which characteristic of the cast material could have been of influence on the total emissivity if their dogbone had indeed being made by one of these casting materials.

    One of the possible characteristics of these casts is their very small grain size which is especially true for RTC-70 which is designated as ultra-fine.

    I seem to remember, but can currently not find that information, that the grain size of the Cotronics RTC-70 castable was 2 um. That is a very small grain size for a castable, so I wondered what the influence of the grain size would have been on the total emissivity.

    The only information I found was the following table which gives some indication of the influence of grain size on total emissivity of Alumina at a temperature of 1200 C



    As can be seen a small grain size lowers the total emissivity quite a bit.

    I don't know if it also lowers the Optris in-band emissivity, but if so it is another possible explanation for the higher temperatures measured by the MFMP.