Clays - possible environments for COLD FUSION.

  • Interesting idea… Should make for some interesting pottery. I wonder if anyone in the Ceramics industry has observed interesting phenomena after firing clays in their Kilns (Normally they are dried at this point though), especially with particular glazes slip/glazes and/or metal oxides included. Maybe interesting to check glazes of pots for element/isotope changes some day.


    Do you know it those pressures are retained after the clays are dried… I suppose there is always some residual water in the clay. Using D2O in clay is an intriguing idea i think

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    Interesting idea… Should make for some interesting pottery. I wonder if anyone in the Ceramics industry has observed interesting phenomena after firing clays in their Kilns (Normally they are dried at this point though), especially with particular glazes slip/glazes and/or metal oxides included. Maybe interesting to check glazes of pots for element/isotope changes some day.


    Do you know it those pressures are retained after the clays are dried… I suppose there is always some residual water in the clay. Using D2O in clay is an intriguing idea I think


    They certainly are retained. That's what gives clays their strength.


    In effect you have a natural prestressed concrete with the pore water in a state of tension and the clay mineral structure in a balancing state of compression.


    When I worked at RRL there was a Section researching suction in soils lead by Dr Croney. I worked in the Soil Stabilization Section and my research led me to poach Croney, Coleman and Black's results and replot them as power relations thus revealing their significance.


    Croney was very pissed off and delayed commenting on my note for 6 months until he was forced to disgorge.


    To be fair to the Section Dr Coleman paid me a handsome compliment by saying:


    "When I saw those graphs, Grimer, I nearly had an orgasm." :)


    The note's probably down the memory hole by now but I kept a copy.


    If you want an long read it can be found here:
    http://www.besslerwheel.com/forum/files/ln_167_fjg.pdf

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    Hi Frank.Certainly Alumina and Zeolites have been shown to be useful matrices for LENR, and are also a component in many types of clay. Here's a recent paper on the topic of Deuterium/Alumina.researchgate.net/publication/2…_a-alumina_coated_Eurofer


    That's interesting. Thanks very much Alan.

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    Since pore water in clays can reach pressures below ambient of up to pF 7 it seems possible that using D2O in clay could be a candidate for cold fusion.


    Using the deuterium as heavy water rather that individual atoms seems more likely to be successful.


    To draw an analogy, individual deuterium atoms are like pairs of wild horses charging around all over the place. An encounter with a second pair at the right orientation for the magnetic field to overcome the coulomb barrier has a low probability of success. Also, because the process is random there is a possibility of generating higher bursts of energy which are damaging.


    Coupling the horses to the oxygen carriage means that the orientation can be controlled. Encounters are no longer random but can be organised by channeling the heavy water molecules along streamlines in the high pF regions between the clay minerals.


    To achieve this one needs to choose the clay mineral which give the pore water a linear structure, i.e that of the ice vapour pressure phase which has the equation of state:
    P = (((V)4)4)4


    As you can see, the vapour in this state is under the first three orders of reduced Casimir compression.

  • Is the interposition of oxygen a problem, or is it an advantage from the standpoint of anomalous fusion? I'm visualizing "hydrogen bonding" between waters, which of course is very low energy, and perhaps completely irrelevant. Please clarify.

  • Alan Smith wrote in my other thread:


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    There are many researchers who have claimed that elements can be transmuted inside living systems, most notably workers in Russia, Germany and France. This link will lead you to a readable 1-page account of some of their findings.oceanplasma.org/documents/plants.html


    The question arises, where in a plant does the nuclear synthesis take place.The fact that the roots appear to search out the highest pF regions of the soil suggest that this occurs in the root hairs which will reach into the smallest spaces at the lowest pressure.


    Interestingly enough one can see a demonstration of the three vapour pressure equations of state by going outside and looking up to the heavens.
    The twelfth power is manifest by the Cirrus clouds (the hair clouds, cf, plants).
    The eighth power is manifest by the Stratus clouds (the sheet clouds).
    The fourth power is manifest by the bulbous cumulous clouds.


    This in turn suggests that the water molecule aggregations are needles, sheets of hexagons and Buckyballs respectively.


    Dr Storms is obviously on the right track with his idea that tiny cracks in metals are a likely CF environment. All that is lacking is any concept of the metallic equivalent of a pF scale, an eF scale, say where the 'e' stands for electric. Rheologically clays and metals differ only in scale so the physics should be analogous.


    Once one appreciates that the Casimir eF environment of small spaces in metals is vastly different from that in larger spaces then something else becomes clear, i.e. that the muon is simply a high mass electron, not a different particle. It has a high mass because it is in a high eF environment. Mass is not a measure of the amount of substance, of stuff. It is a property of motion.


    Leibniz Rules - OK. :)

  • Another mystery is "what is all that sulfur doing in coal ? " The biological sulfur containing components of plant life don't seem to add up. And what about all the U ?



    As for LENR in clay. I think everything is up for grabs. LENR, beyond any reasonable doubt, is real.

  • How does the plant sulphur not add up? Sulphur is a neccesary nutrient in plants, almost equal in importance to phososphorus by volume. Mobile uranium complexes are readily fixed by carbon, which is why it is often in coal. Uranium is rather ubiquitous in soil and rocks, and can even be taken up by plants. Plants in bogs will often take in all sorts of elements they otherwise would not, out of necessity, due to an overall shortage of essential elements and the need to balance ionic exchange mechanisms for other elements required for life.

  • I'm not saying that sulphur is not in plants. It is in one or more of the amino acids necessary for life. It is the quantity of sulphur that is the issue. Some publications say that high sulphur content coal is because the coal formation was buried beneath the sea where sulphates precipitated. Nonetheless, high sulphur coals also have an abnormal amount of less common elements. Low sulphur coals do not have nearly as much of the minor elements. I find it strange. Perhaps a coal scientist not aware of the possibility of LENR would find these comments strange.


    It is an open issue in my mind. Of course, not all issues or observations in Nature have anything to do with LENR. As for Grimers speculations about clay, it seems worth thinking about. The inter-platelet environment might well be a nuclear active environment. Proof is needed and only experiment can determine the issue.

  • The role of clays in fixing lithium: https://pubs.usgs.gov/bul/1278f/report.pdf


    I seem to recall that lithium rich clays are called spumone or some such name. Pottery specialists use it to particular purpose. You can obtain it from pottery supply companies.


    I suggest the following experiment to anyone: get a clay, particularly a lithium rich clay, dry it, put it in a hydrogen atmosphere and see what happens. A simple Geiger counter might indicate something. Then try adding nickel or other. Don't forget Storm's NAE.


    I can't remember how the platelets of clay are separated with some chemistry. Anyway, it is done and the result can be incorporated into plastics. I think the automotive industry uses the clay-plastic mixture for tough steps for vans etc. None of that seems relevant to LENR.

  • I think you mean spodumene. Comes from pegmatites. It is used in glazes for pottery. I doubt it goes in the clay, might make holes, but who knows. Might be possible to get a zinnwaldite clay, but probably a lot of work to find it.


    Edit: looks like hectorite clay is what you are possibly thinking of.

  • OK, ResearchGate had something about clay exfoliation, the term for separating the platelets. I quote:


    "Magdalena Zdanowicz · West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin
    The mostly used method for clay exfoliation is organophilization with cationic compouds, such as quaternary ammonium salts with long alkyl chains. During that process a sodium (or calcium, it isdepend on clay type) atom is exchange for cation from ammonium salt and alkyl chains widen the spacebetween platellets. (but in most cases, it cause intercalation). There are also other methods to clay exfoliation e.g. disspersion of clay in more hydrophilic matrices (mixing parameters are key issues) with e.g ultrasonic treatment. Organophilic clays are use mianly for more hydrophobic matrices. Clay exfoliation/disspersion degree are investigated with e.g. XRD and TEM. Quaternary salts can have semi-, hydrophilic or hydrophobic character, which is base for further application. (type of modifying salt shoul be compatibile to polymer matrix. "


    My comments: the monomer is mixed with the exfoliated clay then polymerized to make the nanocomposite tough plastic. For LENR experimentation, it is obvious that both regular clay and exfoliated clay should be part of the experimental matrix. Also, there are many types of clay each with different exfoliation requirements. Obviously for LENR, temperature and RF stimulation are likely part of the experiment.


    As I recall, some clothes washing detergents satisfy the chemical requirements for exfoliating clay.

  • I find it to be more strange that there are gypsum beds up to 10 metres thick than a bit of high sulphur in coal. Now that is a lot of sulphur to find a source for.


    We cannot easily neglect the very ancient "iron-sulfur" complexes seen in the respiratory chain of bacteria through humans. Our mitochondria still utilize such and this is now clearly understood to be an endosymbiotic advance for eukaryotes. http://dmm.biologists.org/content/5/2/155


    For gypsum, precipitation from calcium rich brines with sulfuric acid, is a chemical possibility at least. Certainly sulfates are well-utilized by archaebacteria to produce sulfides and sulfur.


    How is the reaction reversed to make sulfuric acid? Is that also biology? I suspect it is not necessary, looking at the industrial synthesis of sulfuric acid using heat, sulfur oxidation via transition metals such as vanadium.

  • I don't find it too strange, chemically. The long term geological stability required for some very thick coal and gypsum beds is far more astonishing. In Saskatchewan, Canada, several years ago a new coal formation was found, with thicknesses up to 120 m. That probably represents millions of years of a stable bog environment.