A Cautionary Tale - Palladium Loves Hydrogen - too much!

  • HANDLE WITH CARE - HUNGRY (AND HOT) PALLADIUM!


    Working in LFH'S lab this afternoon preparing quite a large batch of experimental fuel, I began to weigh out components into a plastic beaker. First, 10 grams of Hydrogenated 20 micron Nickel powder, then 2.5 gr of LiAlH4, o.5gr of nano Li and finally, since I am interested in the effects of heterogenous catalyst activity in Ni?h systems, I added half a gram of Palladium Black. Palladium Black is 99.9% pure Palladium - micron sized. It is a 'Class A' hydrogenation catalyst. I dropped this directly onto the top of the LiAlH4/Li in the beaker powder in the beaker.


    The result was almost instant combustion. I can only assume that the Palladium started Grabbing the Hydrogen from the LiAlH$ - which is an exothermic process. This extra heat dissociated more of the LiAlH4 and created even more heat. Then, within a couple of seconds things got hot enough to ignite the Hydrogen. This produced a bit of a fizz and a modest flame - rather like that which might be produced by setting fire to a box of safety matches.


    Not being a stranger to the odd 'chemical event' and noticing that the beaker was starting to melt I picked up the scales complete with melting beaker and tipped the flaming mass off onto the concrete floor, where it fizzed and spluttered for a moment more. You can see 'before' and 'after' pictures below. No harm done. I opened all the doors and windows and left the place to air for a while.


    But this is the moral of this tale. Never add Palladium Black to anything with a Hydrogen donor in it - like LiAlH4. II tried a second time, where this time the LiAlH4 (25%) was thoroughly mixed with the Nickel - same result.

  • Impressive! And kudos for keeping even minded during a potentially dangerous event. I am not a chemist, but know enough that Lithium can be very bad! I probably would have
    headed for the door at first sight of anything becoming air borne!


    It is true that research can be hazardous and people should become educated with the possible danger. (It appears you are!)


    I read a post some time ago on ECW about ME356 warning about the potential dangers and were people were stating .....


    " 3 months ago I smell the "safety" card being played by the propagandists!" =O


    "Yes! The propagandists are right. And we should from now on also stop using barbecues. According to the U.S. Fire Administration, about 5,700 grill fires take place on residential property every year, causing an annual average of $37 million in damage, 100 injuries and 10 deaths." X/


    http://www.e-catworld.com/2016…om-me356-on-lenr-testing/
    (You will have to scroll down and search for the various comments...)


    This type of testing IS hazardous and Mr. Smith has my full appreciation and admiration for his efforts!
    A quote from Mark Twain that you might like..!


    "There are basically two types of people. People who accomplish things, and people who claim to have accomplished things. The first group is less crowded."

    You sir are accomplishing things, not just talking! Godspeed.

  • Yes, palladium and LiAlH4 will spontaneously ignite, Biberian has indeed reported that, and it is not at all surprising, for the reasons given.


    Powdered nickel is an extremely dangerous material, health-wise. Many researchers have reported long-term negative health effects from exposure to it.


    If palladium is to be mixed with Lithal, it should be under a non-oxidizing atmosphere. The reaction will then simply load the palladium with hydrogen.


    I think you understand this, but just to go over it, the hydrogen that burned was not the hydrogen that was grabbed by the palladium, it was from Lithal being heated from the heat of formation of Pd, which is a spontaneous release with temperature. I don't think deuterium is much different here from hydrogen, my impression. Because of the difference in mass, there can be rate differences.


    Glad you are okay. I'm the most worried about nickel exposure.

  • I understood what was happening and thought I explained it above. I personally don't seem to have any problem with nickel -as an engineer I have had a lot of contact with both solid, plating salts and powder over many years. But I know some people do so care is always important. Biberian had his problem with LiAlD4 btw, not LiAlH4 - his was a much more expensive barbecue.

  • But this is the moral of this tale. Never add Palladium Black to anything with a Hydrogen donor in it - like LiAlH4. II tried a second time, where this time the LiAlH4 (25%) was thoroughly mixed with the Nickel - same result.


    That's why Kitamura and the other Japanese prefer to add H to the "running" process. As I mentioned, they used quite successfully: PdNiZrO (sometimes Cu,Ca,Pt is added too, once they used Pd0.016Ni0.070/SiO2-Al2O3)



    "Yes! The propagandists are right. And we should from now on also stop using barbecues. According to the U.S. Fire Administration, about 5,700 grill fires take place on residential property every year, causing an annual average of $37 million in damage, 100 injuries and 10 deaths."



    The most dangerous weapon of a household the soap. 200 Swiss die/year by simply standing on a soap (soapy ground) and gliding away, breaking necks...


    I would ban soaps...