Room-Temperature Superconductivity

  • Jones Beene spotted a really interesting paper (on vortex-l):

    https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1807/1807.08572.pdf


    Besides being well-written and documented, it seems to describe the holy grail - repeatable fully characterized room temperature superconductivity. In particular, look at figure S7C in the end section. The vertical scale is mis-labeled but the transition temperature measured to be 320 K has got to be a world record!


    Replication, anyone? (just kidding unfortunately).

  • Besides being well-written and documented, it seems to describe the holy grail - repeatable fully characterized room temperature superconductivity.


    To be exact: They write "the signs of room temperature super conductivity". See their conclusion given next line:


    "In conclusion, we describe observations that strongly suggest the emergence of superconductivity in an Au-Ag based material at ambient temperature and pressure conditions."


    What we know its that the energy transport mechanism in the SC build up phase can also be use to ignite LENR. In the SC build up phase a spin currents may synchronize more than 10e12 electrons, what even at energy levels of 10e-7 Volts/electron can result in a strong (total) stimulation.

  • What is electricity?


    One definition would be the motion of charged particles such as electrons.


    However, I don't think we will truly understand superconductivity until we realize that electron current is only a byproduct of electricity and not electricity itself. There is a force pushing the electrons from one end of a conductor to another and there is a carrier of this force. Once we gain an understanding of the structure and dynamics of the aether, we will be able to design all sorts of "super conducting" materials -- if we have not already with what has been described by some as "cold electricity."

  • If a superconductor has zero resistance, can it be infinitesimally thin, and still transmit a useful amount of power?

    Sorry, no. Superconductors have a limiting magnetic field that limits how high you can make the current density. Current carrying capacity increases as you chill the material below its nominal superconducting temperature. There are superconductors that work at LN2 temperature (77K) but do not have useful current carrying capacity at that temperature. This is why MRI machines still use expensive LHe.

  • My surmise: a single (i.e. one shot) very brief, super-critical discharge, that is, far above the critical current density for sustained superconductivity, might "sneak through" via some mechanism. Perhaps transient transmission of the excess "supercritical" current pulse via surface "image" positive charges traveling via relatively immobile positive ion to ion "hand offs", which might remain at least charge balanced by above -surface mobile electron flights. That is likely to be expected, and likely seen many times.


    More difficult and more interesting, and showing only when the superconductive critical current density is exceeded, but before thermal destruction of the SC state, and at very high transient field gradients, one might observe near condensed surface the equivalent of "vacuum" or diffuse plasma pair (e+ and e-) production. Perhaps further enhanced by surface oscillating square waves (many examples in LENR, including the Lipinski patent). Hypothetically, at least a relatively easy positron and/or electron escape in the context of such surface condensed lepton / ion charge mobilities.


    As many here know, that is not really relevant for sustained power use or production. On the other hand, it could easily provide useful information on materials and processes for further R&D. An "interface" or surface-associated field gradient of great intensity, yes. The possibility of released leptonic charges, yes. Over-unity spikes, sure, from several sources including store / release, measure errors in charge-noisy, EMF-noisy environments.


    But net, overall, energy gain? Perhaps not as easily, if at all. But still it is here that the information and "theorizing" provided by "Eros" is worthy of some attention and perhaps further, and a bit less "hopeful" empirical effort.

  • More difficult and more interesting, and showing only when the superconductive critical current density is exceeded, but before thermal destruction of the SC state, and at very high transient field gradients, one might observe near condensed surface the equivalent of "vacuum" or diffuse plasma pair (e+ and e-) production.


    There is a lot of literature about SC in arXiv especially written by Hirsch.


    As a starter: arXiv:1201.0139v1


    For people interested in the phenomena I recommend that they first read through it (and the other arXiv SC papers by Hirsch). Hirsch, in an other paper, also makes speculations about e+-e- pair production in a strong SC field. But he mixed up some formulas... Nevertheless, in the limit SC and LENR are very similar as both are spin effects.

  • Hi Robert. I don't do Twittering, so can only read the paper you link. Surely it is not unusual for the s/n ratio to decrease as the signal increases in strength? It can be a function of equipment quality and method, I am well aware that the superconductivity field is as full of backbiting and competition for resources as the LENR field, having had extensive email dialogues with several key players, so wary of any criticism coming from someone claiming to post it a critique 'at the urging of a colleague'. And MIT are no angels I'm afraid.

  • The unusual part is not the s/n ratio change. It is that the green and blue dots, from two different independent experiments show exactly the same random noise, but with an offset. If you think of the up/down variation from sample to sample as determined by flipping a coin, for the flat part of the curve they flipped it about a hundred times for the green experiment, and when they did the blue experiment they got exactly the same sequence. The twitter feed shows a zoomed in version where you can see that more clearly.


    DkMyGCFVAAAaF12.jpg:large

  • This is nonsense, if you don't give the full build out formula, that contains pressure/density & geometry!

    https://arxiv.org/pdf/1603.05093


    Polariton condensates at room temperature


    Abstract

    We review the recent developments of the polariton physics in microcavities featuring the exciton-photon strong coupling at room-temperature, and leading to the achievement of room-temperature polariton condensates. Such cavities embed active layers with robust excitons that present a large binding energy and a large oscillator strength, i.e. wide bandgap inorganic or organic semiconductors, or organic molecules. These various systems are compared, in terms of figures of merit and of common features related to their strong oscillator strength. The various demonstrations of polariton laser are compared, as well as their condensation phase diagrams. The room-temperature operation indeed allows a detailed investigation of the thermodynamic and out-of-equilibrium regimes of the condensation process. The crucial role of the spatial dynamics of the condensate formation is discussed, as well as the debated issue of the mechanism of stimulated relaxation from the reservoir to the condensate under non-resonant excitation. Finally the prospects of polariton devices are presented.

  • Polariton condensates at room temperature


    Yes: As we know since LENR. It works in cavities, because they have the same effect as a huge reduction in pressure. But it is not classic BEC! It's based on quasi-particle resonances.


    But to write they are not dependent on temperature is not correct: Correct: They can occur at moderately "high" temperature! And will certainly disappear if you raise the temperature because the cavities vanish!


    Learn to be precise!

    BECs that are not dependent on temperature for their formation can be superconducting at any temperature.

  • Yes: As we know since LENR. It works in cavities, because they have the same effect as a huge reduction in pressure. But it is not classic BEC! It's based on quasi-particle resonances.


    But to write they are not dependent on temperature is not correct: Correct: They can occur at moderately "high" temperature! And will certainly disappear if you raise the temperature because the cavities vanish!


    Learn to be precise!


    In the SAFIRE project, LENR transmutation occurs in tungsten in plasma at a temperature of 100,000C without the production of gamma. You have much to learn. Video available.

  • Wyttenbach, please give article references which support this sentence.

    Thanks a lot !


    There is a lot of literature you can find your-self. But from a physical point of view its is simple to understand. Pressure is a measure of molecular 3D movement + oscillations. In a 1D open cavity there is only one degree of freedom thus the total number of degrees of freedom is reduced from 3 to 1. Of course there are secondary effects and other relevant physics like the vander Vals wavelength/ cavity radius relation etc..

    I did look at this two years ago and the calculated effect was large enough to support BEC's in cavities at room temperature.

  • The system doesn't look so strange with respect to room temperature superconductivity perspective for me - I'd definitely attempt for its replication. Of course the active ingredient here aren't silver or gold nanoparticles here, but the thin surface layer of silver oxide, silver dioxide in particular. This compound is one of strongest oxidizing agents stable at room temperature and it strongly attracts electrons from outside. These electrons would get tightly packed at the surface of silver nanoparticles, thus leading into superconductivity effect. The fact, that superconductivity observed requires high volume fraction of silver nanoparticles in the resulting mixture (only such a dispersion would form a quasicontinuous phase of silver oxide within resulting mixture) speaks on behalf of this explanation. The gold matrix could be probably replaced by some other free electron rich material, which is stable against oxidation with silver dioxide.

  • US patent 4003757 (Lux and Chobanov) describes one method for preparing this oxide (which they incorrectly call Ag(II)-oxide) in a form suitable for batteries and gives the following example:


    In 1.5 liters of aqueous solution containing 150 grams of sodium hydroxide, 65 grams of silver powder are suspended with continuous stirring. The silver powder has a density of approximately 1.6 grams per cubic centimeter. Its grain size distribution is: 52% under 10 microns; 33% 10 microns to 30 microns, 15% above 30 microns. The liquid is then heated to about 85° C. Upon reaching this temperature, a total of 200 grams of potassium peroxydisulfate (K2S2O8) in portions of about 40 grams each is added at intervals of, for example, 1 hour. After addition of the final portion of oxidant, stirring is continued for 3 hours. The product is then filtered, washed to free it of alkali substances, dried at a temperature of approximately 80° C and reduced to particle form.


    The foregoing yields approximately 73 grams of silver-(I,III)-oxide with more than 95% content of pure silver-(I,III)-oxide. The silver oxide produced is characterized by high thermodynamic stability, low internal discharge and consequent long shelf life. The rate of gas evolution of their products in 18% NaOH is below 1 microliter per gram-hour at room temperature. This stability is attributable to the fact that the process embodying the invention produces single crystals of exceptionally regular shape and monoclinic form.


    The superconductivity trick here will be in preparation of this compound in form of thin layers or more preferably needle-like form. The more isn't the better here: the thicker layers of silver monoxide would probably lose their superconductivity fast.

  • lack of interest from the side of mainstream (they violate BCS theory)


    BCS theory has already been corrected by Hirsch as it only covers 1/2 of the reality.

    Much interesting, thanks for sharing. At first sight VO2 has all characteristics required for LENR, I will give it a try.


    Vanadium certainly is LENR active, as it has a moderately long living, reasonable low magnetic gamma state. But it needs a strong activation e.g. by 7Li.

  • Yes, if anyone please could try VO2 nanotubes!!!


    I can’t produce and load them with atomic deuterium myself, don’t have the equipment for it.


    The material will be very high loaded and atoms are locked inside the vanadium and can only move in one direction (like seen in lenr reactions).


    Think in a magnet field the deuterium can also be activated by Larmor frequency (apply RF energy).

    Or maybe load the tubes with a combination of deuterium and tritium, and apply a second Larmor frequency for tritium,…


    If lenr exist, it must be possible to see it in this material, it has all the conditions to produce this reaction!


    Ron