Ultra-dense hydrogen and Rydberg matter—a more informal general discussion thread

  • I'm not convinced of that, because it's difficult to imagine that something that is at the same time:


    1) Very easy to produce

    2) Very common in the Universe

    3) Very difficult to detect


    can be a practical energy source in the near-term. Or at least, not with the methods suggested so far in Holmlid's studies.

  • If enough people are interested i could probably hold a workshop on preperation, reactor construction, activation, and detection.

    Thank you. Nice gesture. Passing along knowledge is what we are all about. Few members read this thread, so if you do not mind the staff will do what we can to get the word out by other means about your generous offer?


    Others such as can and Rob Woudenberg who have been following you and Holmlid's progress, hopefully will tap into their sources also to find some volunteers.


    We do have different levels of expertise on the forum. Would what you have in mind be something an amateur could do?

  • We do have different levels of expertise on the forum. Would what you have in mind be something an amateur could do?

    Good question. UDH production should not be difficult and in principle it could be done in many ways (even crude) but as far as I am aware of, the most approachable method for detection so far seems the one based on a "blind" photomultiplier tube which Holmlid calls "muon detector". But a complete detection system with used parts and custom electronics would require at the very least 1000 $/€, and realistically speaking probably a few times more than this.

  • Update from Leif Holmlid.


    (PDF) Controlling the process of muon formation for muon-catalyzed fusion: method of non-destructive average muon sign detection Open Access EPJ Techniques and Instrumentation
    PDF | Introduction Muons are observed from pulsed laser impact on ultra-dense hydrogen H(0) [1-3] by plastic scintillators and solid converters, with... |…
    www.researchgate.net


    Abstract The recent development of intense muon sources (Holmlid, Swedish Patent SE 539,684 C 2 (2017)) is crucial for the use of muon-catalyzed fusion reactors (L. Holmlid, Fusion Science and Technology 75, 208 (2019)) which are likely to be the first generation of practical fusion reactors. For this purpose, only negative muons are useful. For existing sources where negative muons can be ejected (if not formed) preferentially, it is neces-sary to know the amount of negative muons to determine and optimize the fusion reactor efficiency on-line. Here, a method is developed to measure the absolute muon flux and its average sign without collecting or deflecting the muons. The muons from the patented muon generator have an energy of 100 MeV and above and an inten-sity of 1013 muons per laser pulse. Here, the detection of the relativistic laser-induced muons from H(0) is reported with a standard particle beam method, using a wire coil on a ferrite toroid as detector for the relativistic particles. The coil detection method shows that these relativistic particles are charged, thus not photons, neutrinos or neu-tral kaons. This makes the coil method superior to scintillator methods and it is the only possible method due to the large muon intensity. If an equal number of positive and negative mouns passed the coil, no signal would be observed. The signal at the coil in the case shown here is due to relativistic positive muons as concluded from a signal charge sign verification in the coil.

  • The muons from the patented muon generator have an energy of 100 MeV and above and an inten-sity of 1013 muons per laser pulse.

    You get a max of 10 D-D fusions from one muon (sticky problem) so this is magnitudes to low. And keep in mind that most likely one laser pulse blows of all UDH...

    So 1013 muons - only negatives ones - what has to be shown! from UDH - give about max 10 Watt.


    All depends on how fast you can recover UDH.

  • The laser has a rate of 10 pulses/second and the signal does not disappear after one pulse, for what it's worth.


    More optimistic energy calculations assumed energies in the order 100 MeV per particle (muon) and an emission rate 10 times larger than suggested in the latest publication, which gave a total average power output in the several kW range with average laser power into the chamber of 1–2W. Solid state lasers should be 25–30% efficient in the best case scenario.


    Whether that many particles per laser shot are being emitted is the real question.