The Dennis Cravens Golden Ball reaction

  • I wish people here would pay attention to details I previously posted?


    • The thermistors used were not sealed for contaminated environments, and that type of thermistor is known to be sensitive to reducing atmospheres.
    • The thermistors were sealed inside the balls and never post-calibrated
    • H vs D would have differential diffusion through the permeable encapsulation
    • The high temp conditioning period looks likely to cause gas absorption by the thermistors, and is noted as being necessary to cause the temperature difference.
    • Therefore we'd expect a long-term apparent temperature difference due to calibration change



    The paper posted here had details enough (including the thermistor type) to see this as a possible mechanism, no details of any check that would rule it out.


    For me, this was an experiment that bugged me till I worked out this mechanism

  • OG,


    Good find. Not surprisingly, the early nineties looked to be a very active period from that University of Utah document. Interesting also in that they were working with RF, magnets, glow discharge, loading limits, along with wondering about patent strategies. Same stuff others nowadays are "discovering", and discussing. You could be right, and maybe they had the answers all along, and they are buried in those documents.


    It will be crazy IMO when the first legitimate, provable LENR for XH, transmutation, or nuclear waste remediation USPTO patent is approved. Many of the old guard will surface (if alive that is :) ), and say "hey, I said that years ago in my patent app, but it was denied", and they will be right.

  • The thermistors used were not sealed for contaminated environments, and that type of thermistor is known to be sensitive to reducing atmospheres.


    • I am not so sure about that. They were ON-910-44004 which is Omega's 2252 ohm interchangeable thermistors with immersion probes. Please give a ref for your " that type of thermistor is known to be sensitive to reducing atmospheres." Unshielded thermocouple do have that problem but I would like to know about shielded thermistors designed for immersion.
    • Hard to imagine that the thermistor part would be exposed much to D2 through the SS when only at 80C.

    I have seen (on a closed private forum) where they were calibrated before the event and even plots of the temperatures across the bed but I will admit I have not seen a post calibration. It is hard to think that one and only one would have drifted by 3 degrees during a 5 day event when the system was at 80C and the specs for the thermistors are +/- 0.2 interchangeable up to 100C.


    One possible problem would be that the 4.5” probes where slightly bent to fit into the 4 inch spheres. Possibly that could allow D2 to touch the thermistor of one but not the other. Doesn’t sound like a short since the temps where both room temp before the start and at the end.

    • I am not so sure about that. They were ON-910-44004 which is Omega's 2252 ohm interchangeable thermistors with immersion probes. Please give a ref for your " that type of thermistor is known to be sensitive to reducing atmospheres." Unshielded thermocouple do have that problem but I would like to know about shielded thermistors designed for immersion.
    • Hard to imagine that the thermistor part would be exposed much to D2 through the SS when only at 80C.

    I have seen (on a closed private forum) where they were calibrated before the event and even plots of the temperatures across the bed but I will admit I have not seen a post calibration. It is hard to think that one and only one would have drifted by 3 degrees during a 5 day event when the system was at 80C and the specs for the thermistors are +/- 0.2 interchangeable up to 100C.


    One possible problem would be that the 4.5” probes where slightly bent to fit into the 4 inch spheres. Possibly that could allow D2 to touch the thermistor of one but not the other. Doesn’t sound like a short since the temps where both room temp before the start and at the end.


    https://www.omega.co.uk/prodinfo/thermistor.html


    Epoxy coated


    Susceptible to reducing atmospheres the oxide-type thermistors are this (not surprisingly) but I cannot find the reference I had - I did link it in the previous threda.


    If using a stainless steel probe there is H/D ingress through the SS (at high temp long time it will seep) and through the insulation seal where the terminals emerge.

  • Talking to a "trusted friend"- he said he seemed to recall that they thermistor probes (stainless) were bent into a sort of up side down question mark shape so that the tip would be in the center of the balls.


    I really doubt that H2 would go much through SS in 5 days at only 80C. I seem to recall you need to get somewhere over 400C or so for that.


    Oh, don't forget that Inf. Energy had a second article by Rod Gimpel citing a replication. Infinite Energy: Rod F. Gimpel replicated Dennis Cravens


    The system reminds me of Les Case's work (circa 1994) where he used a commercial catalyst -Pd in C - and in a spherical tank (he used old WWII O2 tank). Case also had to have a temperature gradient across his sphere to get any excess. It was that system (with Case working with them) that SRI got the famous 24Mev per He numbers.

    file:///C:/Users/dennis/AppData/Local/Microsoft/Windows/INetCache/IE/TKEUTGBP/MalloveEreproducib.pdf


    It makes me wonder.